vermont views magazine

Home page

“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Contributors To Vermont Views Magazine


Mike  Bucossi


See More Contributors ➤

Photograph by Vermont Views

This page is sponsored by Neil Taylor "The Blind Masseur"


Weekly Feature

Apr 7, 2014 - First published November 2011


Vt Views: Before knocking on your door I spent 10 minutes in the lovely old village of Newfane taking pictures emulating a tourist just out his shiny SUV, never been off the road with it… [Laughter] But really spending time clearing out any preconceptions about what this interview should be like, since I know you a bit, and I want this to be about you not me. The idea is talk of quality of life and spirit of place, and I don’t particularly want to lead my interviewee – that’s my first lie Archer, since I did in fact prepare a couple of questions in case you became tongue-tied. [Laughter] For example, I interviewed the chief of Rescue Inc. yesterday and got started by talking about Lew Teich’s moustache… [Laughter]


AM: A cherished possession; he’s had it long enough.


Vt Views: Anyway, après-Lew, I asked the chief if he had read Archer Mayor’s books, and how real they were to him? ‘Real’. He said. ‘Gritty and real.’ The fire chief admitted reading you too – but I mention them since these folks have little elective reading time, and they are of ‘expert’ opinion status in terms of verisimilitude. I contrast these views with what a reviewer in the New York Times has said, since that is merely a literary appreciation; the fact that it also rings true at a collegiate level of emergency service experience seems to make your work literally as large as life.


AM: It’s funny you mention all that since I do have a dual audience when I set out to write these books – half of which would be professionals who know the streets and the procedures I am describing. If I can pass their judgment, get a thumbs-up from them, I feel I’ve met my technical obligation – the other fifty percent of my target audience are those readers who know and cherish the English language. Obviously, the two groups can and do overlap, but—at the risk of being politically incorrect—there a lot of cops and firefighters and assorted EMTs who have only a shaky grasp on the Queen’s English.


Publisher’s Challenge

Publisher’s Challenge


Open Challenges

&

Closed invitationals


Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here

Selected responses will appear in this column.

Challenge #2

April 13, 2014


Challenge open to all

Short, short story


No more than 250 words please. Select one image from the set of 3 below and write a short, short story based on what it evokes in you.















Read More and view contributions in this challenge ➤


Guest Article

The Great Exodus—Salamanders and Passover Crossings

Nanci Bern



It was the first night of Passover; the night of the first Seder. It was also the first night of the annual crossing of the salamanders when they go to the vernal pools to mate. In an effort to save these creatures, BEEC organizes groups of volunteers to protect the salamanders and their attending frogs as they cross the unpaved roads to the local pools. I was one of those organized. A group of us met with raingear and flashlights in tow. Our task was to slow the oncoming cars so all make the long journey across their muddy desert safely.


My reminiscence of that night is like a faceted gem. Every angle reflects what is stored in its earthy memory and gazed upon the time becomes real again. The luminous sheen of the salamander’s skin, the darkness vaguely lit by what the sky could offer, the scent of nature’s abundance deepens my breath.  My heart glimpsed the endlessness of time and its fire spark that night. Archetypal images rendered themselves in my mind’s eye.  I was filled with the presence of this ancient event that was whirling around in every sense I had. Just as I could feel the deep paths of my ancestors’ exodus laden with slavery’s heaviness; I felt the salamanders’ primal urge that propelled them toward their equally long journey across their dirt road. The vastness of each resonated.  


One side of the road had just a few houses each spaced a distance from one another. Their various grasses and plants came to the edge of the road to meet the dirt and small stones that served as pavement. Beyond this lay the vernal pool, the land of milk and honey, or rather water and algae that was their promised land.


The woods from which the salamanders and frogs emerged were on our other side. We kept vigilant eyes on the slope of the road that held the forest at bay, so as not to miss even one. We walked slowly, always with our flashlights pointed toward the ground. What took us just a few seconds to cross, took these beautiful spotted beings many times more. What respect and awe we were all in at the determination and strength we were witnessing. There were times when it was too much to take. Our feelings got the best of us and we would gently pick one up, and with reverence, place them in the grass across the way. We stayed for a few hours, adults and children, and ferried our charges.

Read More ➤


Non Profit of the Month

Loaves and Fishes

Grass Fed Lamb for Brattleboro Loaves and Fishes


A special invitation from

Bill and Nancy Ames



At our farm this year we will continue with our new ministry of helping to feed the poor. Last year and the year before we raised and processed 7 sheep each year and delivered the meat to Loaves and Fishes in Brattleboro; meat that supplemented the feeding of over a thousand meals served at the center. This new ministry for Bill and Nancy uses the resources of our farm in Northfield, MA. Now, if you wish, you can participate with us. Here is how it works:


Individuals, or a group of individuals, can make a contribution to Loaves and Fishes of Brattleboro of $125, and receive a charitable tax deduction. Loaves and fishes will, in turn, use the funds to buy lambs from a local sheep farm (Balky Farm in Northfield, MA). Bill and Nancy will bring your lamb(s) to our farm in August or early September (after they are weaned) and we will feed and care for them until mid-December. At that time we will take them to Adams Farm in Athol, MA to be butchered and quartered in time for the Holiday season. We will then deliver the meat to Brattleboro Loaves and Fishes – each animal delivered in the name of those who originally purchased the lamb.

Read More ➤



Vermont Diary

Apr 18, 2014


A few weeks to organize it, but then 5 prominent photographers came together and we ‘shot’ Brattleboro, getting in 3 of 6 scenarios, good since the wind was bitter. Even so, we started with ‘The Tree’ a giant white sycamore, thence a challenge for 6 men to photograph a very feminine store, Delectable Mountain. Finally to Arch Street and around the old pumping house for the town over the Whetstone.


This morning I went to Loaves and Fishes at 8. On the way there I was almost killed by a driver doing 35 mph on Main Street and I was already on the crossing starting over. She just kept coming and I stood back, just as well since she didn’t even slow down. There has been a hoo-hah this week in The Commons about Brattleboro’s dangerous streets. Usually it is cell-phone use, and it’s usually women I see who are oblivious. My driver this morning didn’t even notice me  brrrmmm!


If I’d had a camera I would have shot her. Which brings up another topic about killers. What is this with “killer-ap” and “killer resume” — what are people suggesting. Do they mean ‘good’ or ‘superlative’ for example, or can’t they talk rite?


Personally I don’t intend to get used to either killer example, and will stick with the contemplative shootists in our midst, and disparage those who murder the language or their fellow citizens.

Read More ➤



Monthly Feature


William Hays, print maker


A visit with William Hays in his studio in Brattleboro. To accompany this article the current print he is working on now appears in a 7 stage slide show at Studio 3, click the link and press ‘play slideshow’.


I had previously interviewed the subject for an hour on January 21, 2011 almost exactly 3 years ago. Readers might like to read the transcript here. Then we progressed from art to the universe and all that.


This time we conspired to be more disciplined and attempt to illustrate a print in progress and something of the nature of the art.


Where better to start than with the inks themselves? An immediate question I had was if the materials the artist used were generally the same as had Gutenberg (c. 1395 – February 3, 1468)? And they were. Stand oil, I discovered, is a base for the ink made from linseed oil thickened by heating in an oxygen deprived chamber, and linseed comes from flax and is a good drying oil for a process known as polymerizing.

Extracts Read More ➤


Selected Letters

Pot Holes

Lloyd Graf

Apr 3, 2014


On last Saturday’s "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me"  the true story of a set

of 3 improbable candidates was that a road service pavement repair

truck disappeared into a pothole it was supposed to be repairing, but

that was in Idaho or one of the Dakotas or Montana -  somewhere in the

Mountain West.    I remember thinking that it might as well have been

somewhere on Western Ave.


Which reminds me of a classic news photo back when I lived in NYNY.

A lot of the FDR highway on the Eastern edge of Manhattan was built

over landfill, so there was a tendency toward localized pavement

cave-ins when things got really wet.    During one soaker of a storm

an entire pavement segment collapsed and went down taking a Mercedes

down with it -  the photo shows the car in a hole deep enough so that

the roof was at the level of the uncollapsed adjoining road surface.

Read More ➤


Monkey’s Cloak

2 Good Friday Poems

Ian Turnbull


Such a filthy man, to be washed clean
Such a broken vessel, to be made anew
Such a wicked man, to have his sins forgiven
Such a cynical man, given faith in you

For grace I could never deserve
Your body was broken for me
For peace I cannot comprehend
Your blood was spilt for me


All So We Wouldn’t Cry Alone

Terri Kneipp


In the darkest hour

When the pain was hardest to bear

Thanks was still freely given

The body beaten beyond compare.

All so we wouldn’t cry alone.


To think of all He gave

My eyes well up with tears.

The weight no mortal man could take

Beaten, scorned, the crowd shouting jeers

All so we wouldn’t cry alone.

Read More ➤



Column Untitled Work


Declaring Spring Has Come

Mac Gander

Mar 29, 2013


As I walked into my short fiction class on the last Thursday of March I said in a loud, cheerful voice that I had decided to declare that spring had officially come, and that from now on we would write as if it were spring, not winter. The snowpack on the quad contested this claim, but the air was milder than it had been and thin sunlight graced the classroom windows, which we opened to get some air.


My fifteen students, bleary with sleeplessness and mid-term exams, seemed willing to accept the premise, though one of them immediately went to his computer to check the incoming weather and reported that we still had much misery ahead—which you know, of course, if you woke to ice sheeting your car the next morning.


I had a great lesson planned, but it went south quickly. Almost none of them had read the chapter that I had assigned, about how to start a story, and then it turned out that I had botched all my copying, so the handout of examples of prose poems and sudden fiction that I had intended to start our next unit with was a thorough mess.


I tried to back and fill by moving right to critique, but it also turned out that the copies of a long short story by one of the students that I had handed out on Tuesday were missing every other page. It was interesting that some of the students who had read it still thought it was quite fine, even missing the pages, but of course we needed the whole story in order to discuss it, so I had to re-copy it, too.


What a mess! Standing in front of the class, I had almost nothing, apart from my declaration of spring.

Read More ➤


Column Ars Gratia Artis

A rose is a rose is a rose!

Terri Kneipp

Apr 14, 2014

      



Everywhere we turn photos are blooming just like the spring flowers we are thrilled to see, even here in Vermont. But, Susan O’Connor posted this lovely photo of a rose bush, carefully tended by her Patrick, in full bloom from Texas. The promise of what is to come here and what is somewhere else took my breath away. Inspired by the photo, Ian Turnbull responded with The Tuscan Rose! Well, I was in tears between the two making me aware of this column’s subject and my next purchase. Off to purchase my own “Tuscan” rose to no avail; however, a “Peace” rose and “Waikia” rose will have to do hopefully delivering equal splendor.


My plantings are just starting out and to reach their full maturity will require tender loving care. They will be joined with lupines in all colors to compliment the peach and pink hues of my babies! After purchasing, comes the hard work…planting. The photos of my little twigs are bleak in comparison to the “Tuscan” beauties, but they will grow.


The circle continues-photo, to poem, to action, to photo, to poem! Art to art. What inspires you to act, to create your own art, be it a poem, a garden, a new recipe? The list is endless of where inspiration comes from and what is inspired! Let your mind go…create!! 


Read More ➤


Column Open Mind

Digital/Device Detoxing is Common Sense

Offie Wortham

Apr 14, 2014

    

It is estimated that today (2014), some 93 per cent of American teenagers are online and 75 per cent use mobile phones, according to figures from the Pew Internet & American Life Project. Marketing data shows that 92 per cent of teens own an iPod or MP3 player, while upward of two-thirds own their own computer (and access to one at home is near-universal). These researchers calculated that the average American teenager was spending 8.5 hours a day in some form of mass-mediated interaction. It is an environment: pervasive, invisible, shrink-wrapped around pretty much everything children do and say and think.


This past July, a highly regarded research team from Sweden led by Dr. Lennart Hardell reported that the risks of developing a tumor on the hearing nerve from using cellphones regularly for more than two decades are greater than previously reported. It is important to note that the Hardell team is also the only team that has reported on the risk of acoustic neuroma from cordless phone use along with cell phones, as cordless phones emit microwave radiation just like cell phones.


Last summer, a team of psychologists from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and the University of Leuven in Belgium found that Facebook use correlated with a low sense of well-being. “The more people used Facebook over two-weeks, the more their life satisfaction levels declined over time,” they said. “Rather than enhancing well-being… these findings suggest that Facebook may undermine it.” If you're feeling bummed, researchers did test for and find a solution. The prescription for Facebook despair is less Facebook. Researchers found that face-to-face or phone interaction — those outmoded, analog ways of communication — had the opposite effect. Direct interactions with other human beings led people to feel better.


Do some of you think it is time to take the iPad away from your kid? In the U.K., a four-year-old girl believed to be the country’s youngest iPad addict has been getting treatment at a rehab center specializing in digital addiction. The Canadian Pediatric Society says kids younger than two should not be indulging in any screen-based activities, including TV, computer, and mobile devices. The association recommends older kids spend no more than one or two hours a day glued to a screen. Cris Rowan, a pediatric occupational therapist, said kids today are in front of screens four to five times that amount. “Overuse is an issue,” she said. “Tech is very addicting. Never in the history of humankind do we have kids with addictions, and now one in 11 kids (age eight to 18) are addicted to technology. This is the tip of the iceberg here.”

Vancouver psychologist Dr. Joti Samra writes that the children are losing social development that’s important, like non-verbal communication and physical interaction. Kids brought up with iPads and their one-swipe access could also fail to learn about delayed gratification, she said. “You put something in front of a child that can easily access everything they want or need, that important life skill is not being fostered in the way it would be.”

Read More ➤ including the first Digital Detox Weekend Retreat on the East Coast


Column Old Lady Blog

Life Is a Deck of Cards or Change is the Constant

Toni Ortner

Apr 16, 2014

   I grew up in a middle class family. We could pay for necessities as well as luxuries.  If a washing machine broke, we ordered a new one.  If an appliance needed repairs we paid for it. We had two cars and could afford gas and repairs. We took a family vacation once a year. We had three solid meals a day.


In 2014 in this difficult economy being middle class is no longer a certainty for anyone. Middle class families cannot pay mortgages and lose their homes. The homeless walk the streets. shelter in churches and get food from drop in centers. Food prices rise steadily. I see people here in Brattleboro standing in the wide renovated aisles of Hannaford with calculators in their hands and food carts one quarter full. Workers pay thirty percent of their income to the government.  Gas prices are out of sight.  Jobs are difficult to find even for persons with college educations and higher degrees. A neighbor has a son with an advanced degree in engineering who works for minimum wage in a Burger King because he is unable to find work in his field. The government tells us that the economy is improving and unemployment is lower but does not take into account all those persons who have spent years searching for a job and given up. Meanwhile the Treasury Department keeps on printing bills so a dollar is not worth a dollar anymore.

Although I understand that nothing is fixed and everything alters each minute, although I understand that the individual balances like a surfer on a turning wheel, there is a tremendous difference between intellectual comprehension and a heart / soul/ gut understanding...


You may have believed you would be married forever and grow old with the person you loved but are divorced. You may have planned for three children but have one. You may have trusted a person you loved but been betrayed either emotionally or financially. You may have worked for thirty years so you could retire on a decent pension but your company went bankrupt. You may have had company stock in your IRA that turned worthless. The bottom line is” the plans of mice and men often go awry.”



Column in between

Julia Ferrari

Mar 3, 2014



Recently at an opening reception, the artists exhibiting were each given a red carnation to wear to identify them from the crowd and honor them. Some artists took to stuffing the flowers disaffectedly in their jean pockets, while others wore them on their lapels. To display or not to display, that was one question to grapple, but what struck me most was at the end of the evening, when the event was closing down, a trash bin at the front desk was the recipient of red carnation after red carnation from people who in mid winter were disinterested in the simple beauty of that single red flower.


This is how we view our lives sometimes, as something we can take for granted. Now in my life, after losing hold of a great gift that was in a way integral to the whole life I lived, I can see the briefness of our time as if it were the petals of a delicate flower, blooming with each moment of our life as a temporary gift. I thought it would never end, that its light would always shine on me. That was then. I still bask in that gleam of a life deeply lived. But oh, how the flowers can so easily get taken away. This second, the next, when will my feet hit the ground again and can I always remember its fleeting nature until once again another boulder hurls itself across my path.


Read More ➤


Column Beer & Bangers

Spring — Beer, Impartially Considered

Terri Kneipp

Mar 30, 2014


A small but mighty contingent of the Beer & Bangers crew met for lunch at The Whetstone.  There an unusual occurrence took place:  we all ordered the exact same thing! We often order several items to present an overview of the dining options, but went a different route this time. The choices included a Belhaven stout, BLTs and fries. Basic lunch fare easily eaten and judged.


As was expected, the beer was smooth, well balanced and the perfect compliment to the lunch items. All attendees agreed on this, and in fact on all points of appraising which was a surprise indeed! The sandwiches were nice, but on white bread a fact that none of us caught before ordering. The bacon was a maple, thick sliced variety appreciated by all, but in rather small quantities. I’m not sure of the others, but I will not order this again as one small sliver of bacon on hearty bread does not suit especially for the price.  The fries were good and plentiful.  Service can be questionable, but was more than acceptable.


After the “official” crew dispersed, I wandered downtown Brattleboro resisting various tempting offerings waiting instead for the next gathering at Flat Street Pub. Being the only member of B & B present, my choices will be the only ones to be divulged.  Some times a specific beer is what is clearly what calls to me: a hot summer afternoon…hefeweizen, a crisp autumn early evening…an ale, or a chilly winter’s night…a lager. But on this evening, nothing particular beckoned. Only one thing to do, sample a variety and see what stands out.  Three were tried, all were good and two were chosen: Tennant’s Scottish Ale and Guinness. The ale was light with a sweet finish that was unsuspected working well as a before dinner drink. The second possibility was Founder’s Porter that was quite pleasing and would’ve paired well with the hearty cheeseburger; but having never tried a Guinness, the sense of being the odd mad out took over. It was serviceable, and as one friend stated: “Guinness is best drunk in Ireland, suits the air.” I believe waiting until visiting the Emerald Isle will be doable. The Founder’s Porter will be visited another day.


Read More ➤


Column Arts & Leisure

Matti Salminen

Apr 8, 2014


And how do some people make such use of their imaginations as to be artists?  Tom Jenks is this week’s featured artist.  When he and I sat down I asked him about his creative process.  My purpose in writing this column is, in part, to illicit a common understanding of the imagination.  My hope is that Tom Jenks’ familiarity with self-expression will give my own conscious understanding of art dimension, and will allow readers to see inside the mind of an artist.


My own experience with creating art, as I experiment with creative writing, is that stories I portray must come from experiences innate to my world.  In order to write interesting stories, I believe, I must first be an interesting person.  But how does this translate into other mediums?


What Tom explained to me was that his creativity comes from a place where he is able to integrate transformative experiences into a visual field.  One of his first art pieces came at a holotropic breath workshop in Boston.  He describes holotropic breathing as a meditation guided by evocative, tribal-like, music.  This meditation induced, in Tom, a dream-like state; he painted right after the meditation, which gave the experience a visual reality.


Our conversation of how the creative mind works went on, and Tom told me more of the transformation process, which has been so important to his imagination. Tom told me of traveling across the Mojave Desert, and attending a festival on the way.  He described the people he met there as healers.  They led healing workshops which helped Tom unearth subconscious magic.  These healers helped Tom to experiment with what he calls bio-feedback.

Read More ➤

This column is sponsored by Friends of the Sun


Column Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Body Politics

Jeri Rose

Apr 15, 2014


          Is life complex because composed of many atoms, molecules, strands of DNA, cells, organelles, tubes like capillaries, veins, arteries, trachea, esophagus, colon, and organs, bone, skin, blood, nerves, all contributing to varying processes? Are these parts, pieces and activities what constitute complexity? Is what comes together and functions to make things work due the title of complex? Simplicity is thought to be lacking in intelligence, too easily arrived at, called facile and lacking in sophistication, naïve and not aware of the complexity of the situation. What if instead, we recognize that when something works it is simple? For even if it takes a lot of parts and pieces to construct it, the fact that it functions means that it has attained clarity. Clarity lets in the light and light is at the heart of the energy of life.

 

          Whenever someone says of a situation that it is complicated, I know that they are not clear. Their thought processes have been confused by factors that obscure their ability to see clearly. As a result they are usually stymied, finding that they cannot function or move with ease and simple alacrity. Confusion means against coming together where life shows us that it is by coming together, by having a whole universe magnitude number of cells agree to work in unison, the beings that we are have human life. We are intricately wrought, but we are not complex. We are simple and like all other life forms we conform to rules for living. We breathe, eat, secrete, are born and die due to a simple code of time interacting on life.

 

               Now those of us on the left side of the political spectrum have a rather clear view of life requiring the natural processes to hold sway. Thus we are concerned with the ecology of the planet. We are really conservative in the true sense of the word. So I do not think a lot of us were out there defending the rights of Mr. Bundy to graze his cattle on land that his family has used for generations. In fact we might cross our index fingers and call “shame” at him for the damage that the cattle do to the land and, after all, aren’t a lot of us vegetarians because we think that eating meat means starvation for others, as well as a lot of us convinced that we are healthier not eating meat?

Read More ➤


Column Chess

Phil Innes

Jan 29, 2014

Guest Article by NOAH DAVIS • March 19, 2014 • 10:00 AM


Luke Vellotti is going to rule the world.


This is the partial text of an email I received while trying to schedule an interview with University of California-Los Angeles freshman Luke Vellotti: “I am taking 23 credits, so there is always homework or a test to study for. I also train the chess team, and I am the treasurer of the Stamps Scholars Society (which gave me my merit scholarship to study here at UCLA), and I am a member of Engineers Without Borders with a project to work on.”


Luke Velloti is an international chess master (one step below grandmaster), a three-time national champion, and a double major in math and computer science. He wants to be a doctor. Luke Vellotti is 14 years old. Was there a time where you remember not being one of the smartest people in the room?


I don’t think so. I went to a gifted school, and I was the youngest student ever to enroll in it. I was the only kindergartner. When I was in elementary school, I was always separated from the other students in math.


Is UCLA hard for you?


The classes are hard. I’m taking two math classes that are honors classes. There are only 20 students in them as opposed to 300 in the normal class, so it’s a lot harder. I like that because I’m with the smartest people here. I’m taking physics—that’s pretty hard but not too bad. The computer science isn’t too bad. I’m also taking some online classes. I’m able to take more classes than I was in Boise, and I can go as fast as I want. That’s why I wanted to leave Boise at a young age. If I had stayed in Idaho for four more years as a normal student, I would have had to take art classes, which I don’t really enjoy. I wanted to come here because I knew I could take the classes that I would enjoy the most.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Column Energetics  Energy policy & practice for the twenty-first century

George Harvey

Apr 9, 2013


Science and Technology, US and World Energy News


Opinion:

¶   “Heads in the Sand: Koch Brothers Push States to Avoid Carbon Rules” ALEC wants to preempt EPA carbon pollution standards at the state level, despite analyses showing they will help protect the climate and yield up to $60 billion in avoided damages in 2020. [The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists]


Science and Technology:

¶   Renewable energy has opened up possibilities for atmospheric satellites. The latest contender is StratoBus. Operating at an altitude of about 20 kilometres, the solar-powered StratoBus will be able to carry payloads up to 200 kg. [Energy Matters]


World:

¶   Mitsubishi and Vestas formally established  a 50:50 joint venture responsible for the design, further development, procurement, manufacturing, installation, commissioning and service of the next-generation V164 8 MW offshore wind turbine. [reNews]


¶   First Solar has said it will develop a series of diesel-PV hybrid power plants for mines in remote parts of Australia. The thin-film module manufacturer and project developer told Bloomberg that mining firms in the country are looking to cut costs as profitability has fallen. [eco-business.com]


¶   With 11,000 miles of coastline rich with energy potential and pollution that is getting worse, China is seen by many experts as an ideal location to pioneer and commercialize ocean-energy technologies. [Wall Street Journal]


¶   Petkim, Turkey’s largest petrochemical complex, has signed an agreement with French power generation and transport systems giant Alstom for the construction of a 51 MW wind power plant at an investment cost of around €55 million. [Balkans.com Business News]


¶   The UK’s Green Investment Bank yesterday unveiled its biggest pay-out since its launch with the £461 million backing for two offshore wind projects. Combined, the projects will produce enough power for 600,000 homes. [Scotsman]

<extracts>  Read More ➤


Column O Citoyen!

Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast Invitation Revised

Robert Oeser

Apr 14, 2014



If you are planning to attend the Fri., Apr. 18 breakfast, please sign up by the Tuesday deadline. A dozen folks have signed up so far. 


Also, please see the revised announcement section below. 

Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast Invitation


The "Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast" will take place on Friday, April 18,  2014 at the Gibson Aiken Center, downstairs, hosted by Senior Meals. Doors open at 7:30am.


Workforce Development & Internships in the Windham Region

Andrew Robinson, Director of Workforce Development and  Jan Coplan, Internship Coordinator, both of the Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation, will speak about their work with the region’s six colleges, the Windham Higher Education Collaborative, the new focus on internship coordination and expanding cooperative workforce development planning. http://www.brattleborodevelopment.com/contact/staff


=> Because we really need to plan for  the number of people having  breakfast, please  RSVP by no later than Tuesday, April 15, by replying to Robt.Oeser@gmail.com -  (or call 518-505-9031 [c])

=> The breakfast, provided by Senior Meals will feature French toast, home fries, sausage, fruit, yogurt, juice and coffee.  Cost is $6.00 for those under 60 years of age. ($3.50 is the suggested donation for those over 60 years.)


Announcements:

Special Town Meeting-Budget Referendum

Voting on the Budget will be by Australian Ballot on Thursday, April 17 (or absentee ballot earlier).

The polling place will be the Selectboard meeting room of the Municipal Center, 230 Main Street, Suite 212, Brattleboro, Vermont; the polls will open at 9:00am and close at 7:00pm.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Column Farmer’s Dairy

Fall News, In and Out of the Kitchen

Elizabeth Wood

A Year’s entries from 2013


This column is ‘resting’ until the growing season 2014 gets going. In the meantime, support your local farmers! Additionally Elizabeth may be joined by a few other farmers sharing this column.


Read More ➤ including  In the Kitchen – Winter Squash and Kale Stir-fry + Sautéed Parsnip Snips




Column Post Oil Solutions

Building Sustainable Communities

Food Security Collaborative Benefit Concert

Tim Stevenson

Apr 6, 2014

   

 

  

Post Oil Solutions and Stone Church Arts will present a benefit concert for the Food Security Collaborative with fiddler and folk singer, Lissa Schneckenburger and modern dancer,  Molly Gawler.

 

The concert will be held on Saturday, April 26, 7:30 PM in the Chapel, Immanuel Episcopal Church,, 20 Church Street,, Bellows Fall.s.

 

Concert Tickets are $12 (general), $8 (students & seniors). and are available at Village Square Booksellers (Bellows Falls), by phone 802-463-3100, or online at stonechurcharts.org.

 

This benefit concert is to raise money for the Collaborative’s community garden projects.

 

Lissa Schneckenburger, New England folk singer and fiddler is “World class…. Far from just offering one dance tune after another, [her] simple settings allow the true beauty of the music to shine through" (Sing Out). Her music can be warm and comforting as a winter fire or potent and exhilarating as a summer thunderstorm. Lissa is a winsome, sweet-voiced singer who brings new life to old ballads, and a skillful, dynamic fiddler who captures the driving rhythm and carefree joy of dance tunes old and new.

 

Molly Gawler danced from a young age, studied Vaganova ballet with Russian teacher and choreographer Andrei Bossov, and broadened her horizons with ballet, modern and improvisational studies at SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Dance. In New York City She danced with contemporary/modern companies including the lead role in Pilobolus’ Shadowland which toured the world. She currently studies at the New England Center for Circus Arts in Brattleboro. Hernew dance company “DropletDance” uses performance art to celebrate water.


Read More ➤


Column My Side of Madness

Schizophrenia and Recovery

Unjustified aspirations

Matti Salminen

Apr 11, 2014


I’ve had to reorganize my life around my disability to make it an asset, and not a hindrance.  There are many ways in which a person can live so that their disability would be an asset.  There are many people who live with disabilities who are very interesting.  Not having to work has given them the opportunity to spend time reading, writing, or creating art.  But we live in a world that devalues those who do not live by their own means.

In the “survivor” community, one word that gets a lot of talk is recovery.  The term survivor references people who live with mental health diagnoses.  Some survivors do not like the term recovery; others do, but consider themselves in recovery, and not recovered.


The term recovery, itself, is not problematic for me.  I am one who believes he is in recovery, and always will be.  Recovery is a life process that allows for growth out of turmoil or unrest.  Too many people put unneeded stipulations on a person’s recovery.  Researchers look at “recovery” rates within different mental health systems around the world.  And the successes of the system are defined by, what portion of given survivors are working?  Or how many are living independently.


What I want people to know is that personal growth is not a quantifiable process.  Many who have experienced existential mental states like psychosis or mania will not fit a role conducive to an industrialized society.  This does not mean they are less well, and in no way should they be forced to fit a mold that would not suit them.


But people in our society aim to work, and I get that.  There is money taken out of people’s paychecks to support those who do not support themselves.  Many tax payers feel as though, for others to get a free ride from  their labor is unfair. The reality is simple.  We live in a world of uneven distribution of wealth, food, and responsibility.  There are people who do not work because their disability check gives them this luxury.  And others do have to work hard so that their quality of living may be acceptable for the society they live in. 


Extracts Read More ➤ including a 2.5 minute video with Matti Salminen

By virtue of writing this column Matti now has a nationwide audience at http://selfhelpmagazine.com



Column rape

Laurie Green

Apr 4, 2014

This column contains violent and sexual material



Does it really take female celebrities to roll out a 'No More' initiative to try and drive home the stereotypes and lack of education surrounding rape?  Doesn't it make sense that we shouldn't accept the following list in the year 2014:

-If she wasn't drunk then it wouldn't have happened.

-If she wasn't wearing a miniskirt it wouldn't have happened.

-If she wasn't walking alone at night then it wouldn't have happened.

-If she had fought more then it wouldn't have happened.

-If she didn't flirt then it wouldn't have happened.

-If she wasn't so promiscuous then it wouldn't have happened.

-If she'd only had a gun it wouldn't have happened.

-She didn't press charges until 3 days later so it didn't happen.

-Women always lie about rape because they're trying to 'screw the man' so it hardly ever happens.


Why don't we keep adding to the lists of 'no more' and 'shouldn't have' and 'never happened':

-If she hadn't been wearing Chanel No. 5 it wouldn't have happened.

-If she hadn't bought that color of red lipstick called 'Cherries in the Snow' it wouldn't have happened.

-If she didn't have a dog named Princess it wouldn't have happened.

-Had the miniskirt been a flirty sundress then it wouldn't have happened.

-Had she just worn sensible flats rather than those Jimmy Choo stilettos it wouldn't have happened.

-Had she listened to classical music rather than AC/DC it wouldn't have happened.

-Let's just put her in a moo-moo and call it a day.

<extracts> Read More ➤


Column The Great Adventure

The Feminine in the Twenty-first Century

Daddies’ Little Girls

Terri Kneipp

Apr 1, 2014


Who are the main influences in little girls’ lives? Parents, siblings and friends at different stages each of these entities play a significant role. But, when it comes down to it, one of the biggest influences in many girls’ lives is their Dad, Daddy, Papa. The idea isn’t new; however what does it actually mean? What do they influence? Clothes…ha! Hair…not a chance! Boyfriends…oh, please…or do they?! They touch those hidden, squishy areas that are hard to pinpoint, but every person has deep inside, love, value and respect. The problem is as women we may not realize how our relationship with our fathers’ affects all our other relationships with men.


If we want society to value the feminine in all of us, then we have to start with women valuing themselves. Where do they learn to respect, honor and know their worth? Through the first men in their lives, you got it-Dad!  My daddy was wonderful at telling me I was smart, beautiful and special: I believed him. Being one of two daughters, I was allowed to try to do anything I wanted-paint the house, you bet; ride a mini-bike, heck yea; and, fix cars with my dad, yes sir. Responsible by nature, I was the typical over-achiever, not wanting to be a burden, not letting anyone take care of me because I could do it myself. I was taught to be self-reliant and independent. Those are admirable qualities that I am thankful to possess. However, having those attributes means I am the consummate caregiver not allowing others to take care of me—ever.


Read More ➤

This column is sponsored by Delectable Mountain Cloth



Column Charley’s War

Phil October, the play

Charles Monette

Nov 14, 2013


As I’ve stated in previous columns, I began writing my first play, Phil October, my retelling of Sophocles’ Greek tragedy, Philoctetes, while engaged in an independent study with world renowned children’s playwright Aurand Harris at NYU in 1993.


Sophocles’ play was written during the Peloponnesian War and was first performed at the Festival of Dionysus in 409 BC.  The story is set during The Trojan War, and tells how Neoptolemus’ (Achilles’ son) and Odysseus’ attempt to bring Philoctetes, the disabled archer, with them to defeat Troy.       

Read More ➤


Column Natural Inclusivity—

Articles on the philosophy and experience of NI

Dynamic Continuity — Why is natural form continuously in motion?

Alan Rayner

Oct 14, 2013


This issue is of crucial significance in appreciating the 'paradigm shift' or, rather, 'Paradigm inversion', made by 'natural inclusionality'. It is one I have found particularly tantalizing myself in terms of 'taxing my imagination to the limit', and finding the words to explain it in a way that will help others get into the necessary 'dynamic framing of mind' has been equally tantalizing. I have lain awake in the small hours trying to 'imagine it out' - and had to tussle with the definitive logic that I, like almost everyone else in modern culture, has had imposed on their education. I get that 'now I see it, now I don't' effect as, I guess, my left and right brain hemispheres come into mutual challenge. The 'Aha!' followed by the 'OhNo', followed by the 'Aha!'

Read More


Op Ed

Food Deserts


Rebecca Burns

Mar 17, 2014


Atlanta's food deserts leave its poorest citizens stranded and struggling. It seems unthinkable but in a major US city, thousands cannot get to places where fresh, affordable food is available


In most of the world's densely packed urban areas, you can pick up fresh produce at a stall on the way home from work or buy bread, meat and staples at the cornershop across the street. But in sprawling metro Atlanta, where the model is megamarkets surrounded by mega parking lots, few of us have the option of a quick dash to the store.


When you're trying to figure out what to fix your young children for dinner and you realise you need milk and eggs and a bag of salad greens and chicken breasts, and you have no choice but to load everyone in the minivan and drive five miles through traffic to get to the store, you're feeling the impact of US development patterns that have made Atlanta the third-worst urban food desert in the country (behind only New Orleans and Chicago).


Living in a food desert doesn't just make it tough to get your daily servings of fruit and vegetables. A 2011 Food Trust geographic analysis of income, access to grocery stores and morbidity rates concluded that people who live in metropolitan Atlanta food deserts are more likely to die from nutrition-related sicknesses like diabetes and heart disease.

In Atlanta, the ninth-biggest metropolis of the world's richest country, thousands of people can't get fresh food, and some are getting sick as a result. Which raises a simple question: why can we build multimillion-dollar highway systems and multibillion-dollar stadiums, but not more grocery stores? If we can build a museum dedicated to a soft drink and one that celebrates college football and another that trumpets civil rights, can't we help our neighbours with what seems to be a most essential and basic right: putting an affordable and healthy dinner on the table?


Read More ➤


Real Food ! 

Green Sauces, 2 variations

Tara Innes

Apr 17, 2014



#1 Tara’s Variation


Cod with fingerling potatoes and "green sauce."


Remarkably quick easy recipe w a couple adjustments.


As you will see from the difference of pictures, I have more of a "green goop" as opposed to their "green water" which is because i don't have a juicer, and made do by just sticking it all in the blender with a touch of extra water. worked quite well—very fresh and flavorful.


Also, we had cod without skin, so I coated it in flour to give a bit of a crunch/retain moisture, which also worked well. I was skeptical that the seared scallions would add much, but the char was a nice counterpoint to the fresh herbiness of the sauce.


I was surprised that this took me only about a half hour, start to finish, without knowing the recipe. good for weeknights.



#2 Bon Apetit Variation


Seared Hake with Baby Potatoes and Green Sauce


GREEN SAUCE

Combine celery juice, sorrel juice, leek juice, and vinegar in a small bowl; season with salt and more vinegar, if desired.


DO AHEAD: Green juice without vinegar can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover and chill. Stir in vinegar just before serving.


<extracts>

Read More ➤



Graphic Traffic

An orientation to illustration and illustrated books for writers

By Marlene O’Connor on Jan 16, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views

Street Dance – Flight, personal piece


Here are illustrations of Marlene’s work and she has also contributed notes on how to sensibly engage graphic artists, illustrators and publishers as a generous addition to orienting the writer to the subject.  

Read More

This column is sponsored by www.zephyrdesignsvt.com


Dec 28th, 2011

Photo Brooks House Fire


Things started quietly enough with normal amounts of snow but the people in the municipal building could hardly anticipate multiple disasters in 2011  

Read More


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Last Entry Mac Gander

Photo Rudyard Kipling at Naulakha near Brattleboro.


130 years ago in 1880/81 Rudyard Kipling completed the 26 question questionnaire. Kipling subsequently moved to Brattleboro and Dummerston, living here from 1892 to 1896.


At the time it is said that Kipling was known by more people in the world than was any other person. I would like to publish your own responses in Vermont Views Magazine to the very same questions Kipling answered.




Please add your answers below the 26 questions on the questionnaire page, or write in for a set of emailed questions.


Read More



StudioONE

I will respond

Terri Kneipp choses photographs and responds with her poems and texts



Photograph by Kenneth Wood


A Solitary Life


Contentedly playing all on one’s own,

Sitting quietly in a room, not too bleak or too stark.

Having no one to tea or to seek in the dark.

Dozers digging, with the captain in the chair,

No one to talk to, no secrets to share,

A young child alone, a solitary life…the seeds are sown.


Gently swaying to the beat,

Listening intently to the music, not too quiet or too loud.

Choosing how to live, to stand out from the crowd.

Nights looming, with THE pilot in control,

Who sees the heart, who heals the soul!

A teenager alone, a solitary life…ready to take the heat.


Peacefully walking all along the shore,

Basking deeply in the glow, not too dim or too bright,

Feeling such love, a warm, tender light!

Moments passing, with the Son at the helm,

Not afraid of this existence, looking toward a heavenly realm.

An adult alone, a solitary life…not splintered, or shattered, but whole, cherished, loved—time to dive and to soar!


See More


Studio TWO

Featuring

February at Gallery 2 at Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works. Featured in this photo exhibit are Deb Lazar, Amy Boemic and  Dale Tilgman [illustrated]. See More ➤


Studio 3

A seven color print, ‘Migration’, by William Hays


William Hays, printmaker

To view the images sequentially, click the link to Studio 3 and press ‘Play Slideshow.’

To illustrate a companion article on print making by Brattleboro artist William Hays, the subject kindly forwarded me these 7 images of a print in the making. The full article will appear as a Monthly Feature.  See More ➤


Studio 4

Featuring 6 Photographers

6 PHOTOGRAPHERS

3 THEMES


Len Emery

Phil Innes

Rich Holshuch

Merritt Brown

Ray Bates

Greg Worden



See More ➤


If You Lived Here

Strolling of the Heifers presents Maple 'n Mud Fest at the River Garden

Apr 17, 2014


In another sign of spring, Strolling of the Heifers will host its Maple ‘n Mud Fest on Saturday April 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, downtown Brattleboro.

The festival celebrates the changing of the seasons with an array of participating farmers and maple product producers. This community event is free and open to the public at the new home of the Strolling of the Heifers.

The official grades of maple syrup are being renamed in Vermont to provide the general public with a little more clarity on what each grade is best suited. Visitors can see, and then taste the differences at an exhibit presented by Hidden Springs Maple.

Bascom Family Farms will be providing a rich history of maple sugaring in the area with artifacts from the late 1890s and early 1900s. Then, speaking with modern maple producers like Robb Family Farm or Harlow’s Sugar House will give visitors a feel for how things have changed.

The Brattleboro Food Co-op will be demonstrating how to use maple as an everyday home pantry ingredient. Several vendors, including Coddle & Cosset Truffles, True North Granola, and O So Fine Gluten Free will offer locally-made products that use maple syrup as a sweetener. Wash it all down with a pickle from Randy at Mountain Mowing Farm!

A maple fest would be incomplete without pancakes, so Green Mountain Flour will be on hand to make that a reality. 

For those with less of a sweet tooth, Varee’s Thai Kitchen will cook up lunch while visitors listen to to local musicians Bada Raga, which offers classical Indian music with a Vermont Twist. Later in the day, Franz Robert and Friends will be playing experimental jazz.

Members of Brattleboro Time Trade will be present to explain what they do and answer questions, and visitors can sniff scented soap offerings from One World Soap.

For the over-21 crowd, Whistle Pig Whiskey, a Vermont local spirits producer will be showcasing their products. And Jen Swanson of Studio Main will be offering great Mothers Day items including soaps, lotions, and “mud” masks.

For further information, phone the Stroll office at 802-246-0982, or visit the website, www.StrollingoftheHeifers.com.

Read More ➤


If You Lived Elsewhere

Beer Special

  Apr 13, 2014

Cornwall in the SW of England is interesting to compare with Vermont since it has about the same population, but I wonder which of the two places has more micro-breweries? Here is a report from Darren Norbury, editor of British beer news website beertoday.co.uk and lives in Hayle, Cornwall. This report may interest our own Beer and Bangers crew who are planning an investigatory trip to Cornwall in 2020.


Cornwall is experiencing a beer boom, with almost 30 breweries now producing their own tipples across the county.

The biggest and best-known of these Cornish producers is St Austell Brewery, which was first opened in 1851. [Captioned: Staff at Skinners Brewery with their beers.]


But over the past few years, dozens have sprung up across Cornwall, producing some fine craft ales. Several pubs, such as the Blue Anchor at Helston, the Star Inn at Crowlas, the Driftwood Spars at St Agnes and the Crown in Penzance, have their own breweries. Other entrepreneurs have set up breweries independently, such as the St Ives Brewing Company, which is soon to open in a public toilet in the town.


To celebrate the start of the holiday season, we asked Cornwall beer expert Darren Norbury to name his top ten beers.

He said: "Being asked for a top ten of Cornish beers is never easy for me. That’s why there’s 12 here! (sorry, Ed).

"We have an embarrassment of riches these days, with 29 breweries in operation here at the last count. My top ten, hopefully, offers variety, both of beers and brewers, and is a selection – in no particular order – from my personal list of go-to brews at the time of writing.


"It may change next week – that’s the joy of the current beer scene."


Here's Darren's top 12:

Atlantic Brewery: Porter

Coastal Brewery: Zeus IPA

Cornish Chough Brewery: Fire Raven

Cornish Crown Brewery: Causeway

Driftwood Spars: Lewsey Lou’s

Harbour Brewing Co: IPA

Padstow Brewing Co: IPA

Penzance Brewing Co: Potion No 9

Rebel Brewing Co: Mexicocoa

Sharp’s Brewery: Cornish Pilsner

Skinner’s Brewery: Pennycomequick

St Austell Brewery: Proper Job

Tintagel Brewery: Harbour Special

Read More


A Word In Your Ear

Drakonian


Draco (/ˈdreɪkoʊ/; Greek: Δράκων, Drakōn) (circa 7th century BC) was the first legislator of Athens in Ancient Greece. He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feud by a written code to be enforced only by a court. Draco's written law became known for its harshness, with the adjective draconian referring to similarly unforgiving rules or laws.


Drakonian also relates a folkloric story of his death in the Aeginetan theatre. In a traditional ancient Greek show of approval, his supporters "threw so many hats and shirts and cloaks on his head that he suffocated, and was buried in that same theatre".


The laws (θεσμοί - thesmoi) he laid down were the first written constitution of Athens. So that no one would be unaware of them, they were posted on wooden tablets (ἄξονες - axones), where they were preserved for almost two centuries, on steles of the shape of three-sided pyramids (κύρβεις - kyrbeis). The tablets were called axones, perhaps because they could be pivoted along the pyramid's axis, to read any side.



More in your ear ➤



Curious Topics


Would you like to wear these?

Apr 18, 2014


In Japan zentai suits are all the rage. People wear these latex suits covering even their eyes, and meet together in public. They say that this is an acceptable way for them to overcome being in public, and less inhibited. Would you wear these suits in Brattleboro or in your home town, if a few others did the same?


Read More  ➤

send any answers or comments to onechess@comcast.net

100 Years Ago

Feature: April 20, 1914

The Ludlow Massacre

Apr 10, 2014




Caption: Colorado National Guard


The Ludlow Massacre was an attack by the Colorado National Guard and Colorado Fuel & Iron Company camp guards on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado, on April 20, 1914. Some two dozen people, including women and children, were killed; John D. Rockefeller Jr., the chief mine owner, was pilloried for what happened.


The massacre, the culmination of a bloody widespread strike against Colorado coal mines, resulted in the violent deaths of between 19 and 26 people; reported death tolls vary but include two women and eleven children, asphyxiated and burned to death under a single tent. The deaths occurred after a daylong fight between militia and camp guards against striking workers. Ludlow was the deadliest single incident in the southern Colorado Coal Strike, lasting from September 1913 through December 1914. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) against coal mining companies in Colorado. The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I), the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company (RMF), and the Victor-American Fuel Company (VAF).


In retaliation for Ludlow, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines over the next ten days, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard along a 40-mile front from Trinidad to Walsenburg. The entire strike would cost between 69 and 199 lives. Thomas G. Andrews described it as the "deadliest strike in the history of the United States".


[Photo captions, above, before the attack, below, afterwards.]


The Ludlow Massacre was a watershed moment in American labor relations. Historian Howard Zinn described the Ludlow Massacre as "the culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history". <extract>

Read More ➤


Local History

May 5, 2013


A lyrical homage by Charles Monette



With 1878’s best intentions, some sturdy men began

Building Brattleboro’s narrow gauge in the southeast kingdom

Upside verdant country, the West River, to South Londonderry

Financed by bankers’ bonds bought in towns’ river valleys

Read More



Sep 7, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views


A photo essay of 40 images and caption


“Before The Fall”



Read More



Reviews Old & New

By Robert Macfarlane

Review by Alan Rayner

At the core of this book is an awareness of the reciprocal dynamic relationship between human self-identity and place: the recognition that what surrounds a person is just as vital to and cannot be isolated from who and how that person is as what is within them. It is also continually changing. This relationship might, with a little imaginative contemplation, seem self-evident. It has, however, been obscured for thousands of years by abstract systems of thought that remove human consciousness from what it naturally includes and is included in by imposing rigid definition on naturally continuous space and dynamic boundaries. Such ‘abstract-mindedness’ has become so deeply embedded in modern philosophy, science, mathematics and education that many of us can only escape it by embarking on journeys of self-discovery through direct experience of the natural world as it is, in the raw, not as it is defined in academic texts. ‘The Old Ways’ describes one such journey, inspired by and paying homage to the ambivalent life and work of the poet and soldier, Edward Thomas.

<extract>  Read More ➤

Brattleboro Skyline

A photo essay

Apr 1, 2013

Photo Tall Person on Flat St Vermont Views


Last River Garden WinterFarmers Market of the the year


Read More


Localvore Directory

Click this link for locally grown and manufactured food products and how to find them directly

Mar 24, 2013


To add your business to the free listing of Localvores — contact the publisher at onechess@comcast.net


Phone numbers, websites, e-mails, travel directions and hours of business of a few dozen local farms and businesses making Vermont food products. Support your local food economy!


Just Added — Full Plate Farm

 

Full Plate Farm is a one acre vegetable farm conveniently located one and a half miles from downtown Brattleboro, VT.  We grow over 100 varieties of delectable, nutritious veggies using organic practices. We offer a CSA which includes all of our veggies, as well as berries and sweet corn from a few other local farms. We offer 12 different share options, so that you can choose how much produce you get and when. We also offer options between some of the veggies in your share as well as a “swap box” so that you will always have a choice to trade out a veggie you don’t like for one you do. Every week we include recipes and cooking suggestions. 


Read More ➤


This column is sponsored by the Brattleboro Food Coop http://brattleborofoodcoop.coop


Write On!

Relativity

Offie C. Wortham

Apr 16, 2013




A scream shatters the air, followed by the breaking of glass and gun shots.

A baby cries, for parents or guardians preoccupied elsewhere,

entertaining drunken and drugged friends.

Foul-mouthed and forgotten children play in the streets darting between fire trucks racing to false alarms.

Police cars have gone insane racing through red and yellow lights.

Loud, deafening, earsplitting boom boxes, car radios, TV's, DVD’s and CD's flow through your walls, floor, and ceiling,

Like a cyclone or hurricane through chicken wire.

You close your eyes and try to relax and sleep.

You pray for one moment of peace, silence, or quiet.

Meanwhile ………………..

30 miles out in the suburbs, a person says to their companion,

Come on Dear, let's go inside.

The noise from these frogs and crickets is driving me crazy!

Read More ➤


B.E.S.T

Are you wearing Dhaka?

Apr 26, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views Shop Window

This article is an extract from The Guardian, UK


When it comes to fashion, applying even the most modest ethical criteria is ridiculously hard. All the big chains – including Primark, which had a supplier in the destroyed Rana Plaza building on Dhaka's outskirts, and has promised "to provide support where possible" to the families of the 187 workers known to have died – have ethics policies that can be viewed online. None has a clearly labelled and readily availably Fairtrade or equivalent line on the shop floor.


Read More



Archive

Hundreds of previous articles



A collection of contributed work, articles and columns from around the community, including transcripts from 80+ recorded interviews from the ‘In Conversation With’ series.


Go to Archive ➤


Vermont Views Magazine

Unless otherwise stated all content claimed copyright © 2010 and 2014

all rights reserved by vermontviews.org 


Write for permissions to reprint or extract,

to the publisher at


onechess@comcast.net


Vermont Views Magazine

Quality of Life, Spirit of Place




 

Vermont Views Magazine


Home Page

 

Articles,  Columns & Galleries

  New Articles

Just for a change, toward Treryn Dinas, Cornwall, England. And a sea of corn stalks, Brattleboro.

Photos of the Day sponsored by:

Fine Art

&

Contemporary American Craft

106 Main St.   Brattleboro, VT 05301  

www.vtart.com    (802) 257-7044

  Passages Daily  

Gabriel García Márquez



Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez 6 March 1927 – 17 April 2014) was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, known affectionately as Gabo throughout Latin America. Considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century, he was awarded the 1972 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature.


“If I knew that today would be the last time I’d see you, I would hug you tight and pray the Lord be the keeper of your soul. If I knew that this would be the last time you pass through this door, I’d embrace you, kiss you, and call you back for one more. If I knew that this would be the last time I would hear your voice, I’d take hold of each word to be able to hear it over and over again. If I knew this is the last time I see you, I’d tell you I love you, and would not just assume foolishly you know it already.”


“No medicine cures what happiness cannot.”


“He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.”


“It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.”


“But when a woman decides to sleep with a man, there is no wall she will not scale, no fortress she will not destroy, no moral consideration she will not ignore at its very root: there is no God worth worrying about.”


“All human beings have three lives: public, private, and secret.”


“I discovered that my obsession for having each thing in the right place, each subject at the right time, each word in the right style, was not the well-deserved reward of an ordered mind but just the opposite: a complete system of pretense invented by me to hide the disorder of my nature. I discovered that I am not disciplined out of virtue but as a reaction to my negligence, that I appear generous in order to conceal my meanness, that I pass myself off as prudent because I am evil-minded, that I am conciliatory in order not to succumb to my repressed rage, that I am punctual only to hide how little I care about other people’s time. I learned, in short, that love is not a condition of the spirit but a sign of the zodiac.”


Novels

In Evil Hour (1962)

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967)

The Autumn of the Patriarch (1975)

Love in the Time of Cholera (1985)

The General in His Labyrinth (1989)

Of Love and Other Demons (1994)


“Death really did not matter to him but life did, and therefore the sensation he felt when they gave their decision was not a feeling of fear but of nostalgia.”



 

Publisher’s Challenge

Publisher’s Challenge


Open Challenges

&

Closed invitationals


Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here

Selected responses will appear in this column.

Challenge #2

April 13, 2014


Challenge open to all

Short, short story


No more than 250 words please. Select one image from the set of 3 and write a short, short story based on what it evokes in you.


The Images: Daniel Garber, 1911; Clogwyn Station, Jackson Pollock.

Contributors


Phil Innes

Charles Monette

Andrea Powell

Rob Mitchell




Read More: See images and view contributions in this challenge ➤

 

To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year




Today: the music of the spheres


Keyword: attunement to cosmic order


Apr 18, 2014 Aries 29°  (16° to 30° Aries is POTENCY in Act I; Differentiation)

 
Column Ars Gratia Artis

A rose is a rose is a rose!

Terri Kneipp

Apr 14, 2014

      



Everywhere we turn photos are blooming just like the spring flowers we are thrilled to see, even here in Vermont. But, Susan O’Connor posted this lovely photo of a rose bush, carefully tended by her Patrick, in full bloom from Texas. The promise of what is to come here and what is somewhere else took my breath away. Inspired by the photo, Ian Turnbull responded with The Tuscan Rose! Well, I was in tears between the two making me aware of this column’s subject and my next purchase. Off to purchase my own “Tuscan” rose to no avail; however, a “Peace” rose and “Waikia” rose will have to do hopefully delivering equal splendor.


My plantings are just starting out and to reach their full maturity will require tender loving care. They will be joined with lupines in all colors to compliment the peach and pink hues of my babies! After purchasing, comes the hard work…planting. The photos of my little twigs are bleak in comparison to the “Tuscan” beauties, but they will grow.


The circle continues-photo, to poem, to action, to photo, to poem! Art to art. What inspires you to act, to create your own art, be it a poem, a garden, a new recipe? The list is endless of where inspiration comes from and what is inspired! Let your mind go…create!! 


Read More ➤

 

Studio 4

Featuring 6 Photographers

6 PHOTOGRAPHERS

3 THEMES


Apr 17, 2014



Len Emery

Phil Innes

Rich Holshuch

Merritt Brown

Ray Bates

Greg Worden


This is an article in progress and will likely be continuously updatedfor a week or so



View More ➤

 

Write On!

Relativity

Offie C. Wortham

Apr 16, 2013




A scream shatters the air, followed by the breaking of glass and gun shots.

A baby cries, for parents or guardians preoccupied elsewhere,

entertaining drunken and drugged friends.

Foul-mouthed and forgotten children play in the streets darting between fire trucks racing to false alarms.

Police cars have gone insane racing through red and yellow lights.

Loud, deafening, earsplitting boom boxes, car radios, TV's, DVD’s and CD's flow through your walls, floor, and ceiling,

Like a cyclone or hurricane through chicken wire.

You close your eyes and try to relax and sleep.

You pray for one moment of peace, silence, or quiet.

Meanwhile ………………..

30 miles out in the suburbs, a person says to their companion,

Come on Dear, let's go inside.

The noise from these frogs and crickets is driving me crazy!

Read More ➤

 

Vermont Diary

Apr 18, 2014


A few weeks to organize it, but then 5 prominent photographers came together and we ‘shot’ Brattleboro, getting in 3 of 6 scenarios, good since the wind was bitter. Even so, we started with ‘The Tree’ a giant white sycamore, thence a challenge for 6 men to photograph a very feminine store, Delectable Mountain. Finally to Arch Street and around the old pumping house for the town over the Whetstone.


This morning I went to Loaves and Fishes at 8. On the way there I was almost killed by a driver doing 35 mph on Main Street and I was already on the crossing starting over. She just kept coming and I stood back, just as well since she didn’t even slow down. There has been a hoo-hah this week in The Commons about Brattleboro’s dangerous streets. Usually it is cell-phone use, and it’s usually women I see who are oblivious. My driver this morning didn’t even notice me  brrrmmm!


If I’d had a camera I would have shot her. Which brings up another topic about killers. What is this with “killer-ap” and “killer resume” — what are people suggesting. Do they mean ‘good’ or ‘superlative’ for example, or can’t they talk rite?


Personally I don’t intend to get used to either killer example, and will stick with the contemplative shootists in our midst, and disparage those who murder the language or their fellow citizens.

Read More ➤

 
Column Old Lady Blog

Life Is a Deck of Cards or Change is the Constant

Toni Ortner

Apr 16, 2014

   I grew up in a middle class family. We could pay for necessities as well as luxuries.  If a washing machine broke, we ordered a new one.  If an appliance needed repairs we paid for it. We had two cars and could afford gas and repairs. We took a family vacation once a year. We had three solid meals a day.


In 2014 in this difficult economy being middle class is no longer a certainty for anyone. Middle class families cannot pay mortgages and lose their homes. The homeless walk the streets. shelter in churches and get food from drop in centers. Food prices rise steadily. I see people here in Brattleboro standing in the wide renovated aisles of Hannaford with calculators in their hands and food carts one quarter full. Workers pay thirty percent of their income to the government.  Gas prices are out of sight.  Jobs are difficult to find even for persons with college educations and higher degrees. A neighbor has a son with an advanced degree in engineering who works for minimum wage in a Burger King because he is unable to find work in his field. The government tells us that the economy is improving and unemployment is lower but does not take into account all those persons who have spent years searching for a job and given up. Meanwhile the Treasury Department keeps on printing bills so a dollar is not worth a dollar anymore.

Although I understand that nothing is fixed and everything alters each minute, although I understand that the individual balances like a surfer on a turning wheel, there is a tremendous difference between intellectual comprehension and a heart / soul/ gut understanding...


You may have believed you would be married forever and grow old with the person you loved but are divorced. You may have planned for three children but have one. You may have trusted a person you loved but been betrayed either emotionally or financially. You may have worked for thirty years so you could retire on a decent pension but your company went bankrupt. You may have had company stock in your IRA that turned worthless. The bottom line is” the plans of mice and men often go awry.”


Read More ➤

 
✩ New 
Feature
Articles

Vermont Diary
Shootists
Apr 18, 2014


Curious Topics
Zentai suits
Would You Like To Wear These?
Apr 18, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak
2 Good Friday Poems
Ian Turnbull
For Grace 
&
Terri Kneipp
All So We Wouldn’t Cry Alone


Real Food !
Tara Innes 
Green Sauces, 2 variations
Apr 17, 2014


Studio 4
Group Shoot 
6 PHOTOGRAPHERS
3 
THEMES
Apr 17, 2014



Old Lady Blog
Toni Ortner 
Life Is a Deck of Cards or Change is the Constant
Apr 16, 2014


Write On!
Offie C. Wortham
Relativity  
Apr 16, 2014

Archetypal Hippie Speaks
Jeri Rose
Body Politics  
Apr 15, 2014


New Column
Open Mind
Offie Wortham
Digital/Device Detoxing is Common Sense
Apr 14, 2014


New Column
Ars Gratia Artis
Terri Kneipp
A rose is a rose is a rose!
Apr 14, 2014

If You Lived Elsewhere
Beer Special 
Apr 13, 2014

Guest Article
Nanci Bern 
The Great Exodus—Salamanders and Passover Crossings
Apr 13, 2014


New Column Publisher’s Challenge
“Short, short story”
 Apr 13, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak
Charles Monette
Stray details  
Apr 12, 2014


Vermont Diary
A survey 
PhDs, ‘pot holes’ and a billion bucks
Mar 11, 2014


My Side of Madness
Matti Salminen 
Unjustified aspirations
Apr 11, 2014



100 Years Ago
 Feature: April 20, 1914
The Ludlow Massacre
Apr 10, 2014


Energetics
George Harvey 
Science and Technology, US and World Energy News
Apr 9, 2014


Old Lady Blog
Toni Ortner
The Woman Who Juggled Glass Balls
Apr 9, 2014


Arts & Leisure
Matti Salminen
What excites imagination?
Apr 8, 2014


O Citoyen!
Robert Oeser
Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast Invitation
Apr 8, 2014


Weekly Feature
In Conversation with Archer Mayor 
Apr 7, 2014


Vermont Diary
Sap, columnists, hype, just like you
Apr 6, 2014



Post Oil Solutions
Tim Stevenson
Food Security Collaborative Benefit Concert
Apr 6, 2014


Archetypal Hippie Speaks
Jeri Rose
 A Modest Proposal
Apr 5, 2014


Non Profit of the Month
Loaves and Fishes
A special invitation from 
Bill and Nancy Ames
Apr 5, 2014



New Column
Open Mind
Offie Wortham
Do we really have a caste system in America?!
Apr 5, 2014


rape
Cherries in the Snow
Laurie Green 
Apr 4, 2014


Selected Letters
Lloyd Graf
Pot Holes essential to local economy?
Apr 3, 2014


Write On!
Mac Gander
Teaching the Prose Poem at the 100th Anniversary of the Great War
Apr 2, 2014


Post Oil Solutions
Tim Stevenson 
Climate Change Cafe: "Dealing with Climate Change in Vermont"
Apr 2, 2014


The Great Adventure
Terri Kneipp
Daddies’ Little Girls
Apr 1, 2014


100 Years Ago
Feature: 31st March, 1914
First Survey of Easter Island
Mar 31, 2014


Vermont Diary
The missing plane 
CNN’s ghoulish obsession ignores facts at home
Mar 30, 2014



Beer & Bangers
Terri Kneipp
Spring — Beer, Impartially Considered
Mar 30, 2014


New Column
Ars Gratia Artis
Terri Kneipp
Ray Bates, The British Clockmaker
Mar 29, 2014


Just Added
Full Plate Farm
Localvore Directory
Mar 24, 2014


Selected Letters
Offie Wortham
The Call for a National Conversation to bury 
“The One-Drop Rule”
Mar 25, 2014

rape
Howard Dean — Don’t go to Dartmouth
A GUEST ARTICLE by CHARLOTTE ALBRIGHT 
Mar 20, 2014


Op Ed
Rebecca Burns
We can’t even  feed ourselves
Food Deserts
mar 17, 2014 

Monthly Feature
Photo Essay
William Hays, 
print maker
February, 2014


To This Degree
An image a day for every day of the year.
✩ Daily

Passages
✩ Daily

Weather
Local & National 
see below
✩ Daily

Weather
Apr 18, 2014 



from NOAA 
The National Weather Service

Brattleboro: Mostly sunny, with a high near 51. Calm wind becoming southeast 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon.
Tonight
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 33. Light south wind.
National: Heavy rain likely for portions of the Southeast on Friday

An area of low pressure in the northern Gulf of Mexico will bring several inches of rain to portions of the Southeast on Friday. Rain will be moderate to occasionally heavy at times and will make travel conditions difficult. Hardest hit areas are expected to be southern Alabama, southern Georgia and northern Florida where rainfall totals will range from 2 to 4 inches with locally higher amounts.

Vermont Views
Magazine

A 
unique 
community supported 
magazine 
exploring
Quality of Life
 and 
Spirit of Place
in our bio-region
with
extraordinary
photographs 
18 regular columnists
plus feature articles, galleries & essays
new articles and photos every day
To contribute an article
contact the magazine 
here

Visit the
Archive 
of 
Articles

Click on a SPONSOR
link to visit 
their website

Vermont 
Artisan 
Designs

Brattleboro 
Food 
Coop

Neil Taylor 
"The Blind Masseur"

Delectable 
Mountain 
Cloth

Friends of the Sun

Zephyr Designs

Sponsor a page in this magazine email
the publisherVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlMonkeys_Cloak.htmlMonkeys_Cloak.htmlMonkeys_Cloak.htmlMonkeys_Cloak.htmlREAL_FOOD_%21.htmlREAL_FOOD_%21.htmlStudio_4.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlArchetypal_Hippie_Speaks.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlArs_Gratia_Artis.htmlArs_Gratia_Artis.htmlIf_you_lived_Elsewhere.htmlGuest_Article.htmlGuest_Article.htmlGuest_Article.htmlGuest_Article.htmlNon-Profit_of_the_Month.htmlPublishers_Challenge.htmlMonkeys_Cloak.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlMy_Side_of_Madness.htmlMy_Side_of_Madness.htmlArts_%26_Leisure.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.htmlEnergetics.htmlEnergetics.htmlEnergetics.htmlEnergetics.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlOld_Lady_Blog.htmlArts_%26_Leisure.htmlArts_%26_Leisure.htmlO_Citoyen%21.htmlO_Citoyen%21.htmlO_Citoyen%21.htmlO_Citoyen%21.htmlWeekly_Feature/Weekly_Feature.htmlWeekly_Feature/Weekly_Feature.htmlWeekly_Feature/Weekly_Feature.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlArchetypal_Hippie_Speaks.htmlArchetypal_Hippie_Speaks.htmlNon-Profit_of_the_Month.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlOpen_Mind.htmlRape.htmlRape.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlWrite_On%21.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlPost_Oil_Solutions.htmlThe_Great_Adventure.htmlThe_Great_Adventure.htmlNon-Profit_of_the_Month.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.html100_Years_Ago.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlVermont_Diary.htmlBeer_%26_Bangers.htmlBeer_%26_Bangers.htmlBeer_%26_Bangers.htmlArs_Gratia_Artis.htmlArs_Gratia_Artis.htmlLocalvore_Directory.htmlLocalvore_Directory.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlSelected_Letters.htmlRape.htmlRape.htmlRape.htmlOp_Ed.htmlOp_Ed.htmlNon-Profit_of_the_Month.htmlArts_%26_Leisure.htmlArts_%26_Leisure.htmlmailto:onechess@comcast.net?subject=Article%20Vermont%20Views%20MagazineWeekly_Feature/Archive.htmlWeekly_Feature/Archive.htmlWeekly_Feature/Archive.htmlhttp://www.vtart.comhttp://www.vtart.comhttp://www.vtart.comhttp://brattleborofoodcoop.coophttp://brattleborofoodcoop.coophttp://brattleborofoodcoop.coophttp://theblindmasseur.comhttp://theblindmasseur.comhttp://www.delectablemountain.comhttp://www.delectablemountain.comhttp://www.delectablemountain.comhttp://www.friendsofthesun.comhttp://www.zephyrdesignsvt.comshapeimage_64_link_0shapeimage_64_link_1shapeimage_64_link_2shapeimage_64_link_3shapeimage_64_link_4shapeimage_64_link_5shapeimage_64_link_6shapeimage_64_link_7shapeimage_64_link_8shapeimage_64_link_9shapeimage_64_link_10shapeimage_64_link_11shapeimage_64_link_12shapeimage_64_link_13shapeimage_64_link_14shapeimage_64_link_15shapeimage_64_link_16shapeimage_64_link_17shapeimage_64_link_18shapeimage_64_link_19shapeimage_64_link_20shapeimage_64_link_21shapeimage_64_link_22shapeimage_64_link_23shapeimage_64_link_24shapeimage_64_link_25shapeimage_64_link_26shapeimage_64_link_27shapeimage_64_link_28shapeimage_64_link_29shapeimage_64_link_30shapeimage_64_link_31shapeimage_64_link_32shapeimage_64_link_33shapeimage_64_link_34shapeimage_64_link_35shapeimage_64_link_36shapeimage_64_link_37shapeimage_64_link_38shapeimage_64_link_39shapeimage_64_link_40shapeimage_64_link_41shapeimage_64_link_42shapeimage_64_link_43shapeimage_64_link_44shapeimage_64_link_45shapeimage_64_link_46shapeimage_64_link_47shapeimage_64_link_48shapeimage_64_link_49shapeimage_64_link_50shapeimage_64_link_51shapeimage_64_link_52shapeimage_64_link_53shapeimage_64_link_54shapeimage_64_link_55shapeimage_64_link_56shapeimage_64_link_57shapeimage_64_link_58shapeimage_64_link_59shapeimage_64_link_60shapeimage_64_link_61shapeimage_64_link_62shapeimage_64_link_63shapeimage_64_link_64shapeimage_64_link_65shapeimage_64_link_66shapeimage_64_link_67shapeimage_64_link_68shapeimage_64_link_69shapeimage_64_link_70shapeimage_64_link_71shapeimage_64_link_72shapeimage_64_link_73shapeimage_64_link_74shapeimage_64_link_75shapeimage_64_link_76shapeimage_64_link_77shapeimage_64_link_78shapeimage_64_link_79shapeimage_64_link_80shapeimage_64_link_81shapeimage_64_link_82shapeimage_64_link_83shapeimage_64_link_84shapeimage_64_link_85shapeimage_64_link_86shapeimage_64_link_87shapeimage_64_link_88shapeimage_64_link_89shapeimage_64_link_90shapeimage_64_link_91shapeimage_64_link_92shapeimage_64_link_93shapeimage_64_link_94shapeimage_64_link_95shapeimage_64_link_96shapeimage_64_link_97shapeimage_64_link_98shapeimage_64_link_99shapeimage_64_link_100shapeimage_64_link_101shapeimage_64_link_102shapeimage_64_link_103shapeimage_64_link_104shapeimage_64_link_105shapeimage_64_link_106shapeimage_64_link_107shapeimage_64_link_108shapeimage_64_link_109shapeimage_64_link_110shapeimage_64_link_111shapeimage_64_link_112shapeimage_64_link_113shapeimage_64_link_114shapeimage_64_link_115shapeimage_64_link_116shapeimage_64_link_117shapeimage_64_link_118shapeimage_64_link_119shapeimage_64_link_120shapeimage_64_link_121shapeimage_64_link_122shapeimage_64_link_123shapeimage_64_link_124shapeimage_64_link_125shapeimage_64_link_126shapeimage_64_link_127
Real Food ! 

Green Sauces, 2 variations

Tara Innes

Apr 17, 2014



#1 Tara’s Variation


Cod with fingerling potatoes and "green sauce."


Remarkably quick easy recipe w a couple adjustments.


As you will see from the difference of pictures, I have more of a "green goop" as opposed to their "green water" which is because i don't have a juicer, and made do by just sticking it all in the blender with a touch of extra water. worked quite well—very fresh and flavorful.


Also, we had cod without skin, so I coated it in flour to give a bit of a crunch/retain moisture, which also worked well. I was skeptical that the seared scallions would add much, but the char was a nice counterpoint to the fresh herbiness of the sauce.


I was surprised that this took me only about a half hour, start to finish, without knowing the recipe. good for weeknights.



#2 Bon Apetit Variation


Seared Hake with Baby Potatoes and Green Sauce


GREEN SAUCE

Combine celery juice, sorrel juice, leek juice, and vinegar in a small bowl; season with salt and more vinegar, if desired.


DO AHEAD: Green juice without vinegar can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover and chill. Stir in vinegar just before serving.


<extracts>

Read More ➤

 
Column Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Body Politics

Jeri Rose

Apr 15, 2014


          Is life complex because composed of many atoms, molecules, strands of DNA, cells, organelles, tubes like capillaries, veins, arteries, trachea, esophagus, colon, and organs, bone, skin, blood, nerves, all contributing to varying processes? Are these parts, pieces and activities what constitute complexity? Is what comes together and functions to make things work due the title of complex? Simplicity is thought to be lacking in intelligence, too easily arrived at, called facile and lacking in sophistication, naïve and not aware of the complexity of the situation. What if instead, we recognize that when something works it is simple? For even if it takes a lot of parts and pieces to construct it, the fact that it functions means that it has attained clarity. Clarity lets in the light and light is at the heart of the energy of life.

 

          Whenever someone says of a situation that it is complicated, I know that they are not clear. Their thought processes have been confused by factors that obscure their ability to see clearly. As a result they are usually stymied, finding that they cannot function or move with ease and simple alacrity. Confusion means against coming together where life shows us that it is by coming together, by having a whole universe magnitude number of cells agree to work in unison, the beings that we are have human life. We are intricately wrought, but we are not complex. We are simple and like all other life forms we conform to rules for living. We breathe, eat, secrete, are born and die due to a simple code of time interacting on life.

 

               Now those of us on the left side of the political spectrum have a rather clear view of life requiring the natural processes to hold sway. Thus we are concerned with the ecology of the planet. We are really conservative in the true sense of the word. So I do not think a lot of us were out there defending the rights of Mr. Bundy to graze his cattle on land that his family has used for generations. In fact we might cross our index fingers and call “shame” at him for the damage that the cattle do to the land and, after all, aren’t a lot of us vegetarians because we think that eating meat means starvation for others, as well as a lot of us convinced that we are healthier not eating meat? Read More ➤

 
Column Open Mind

Digital/Device Detoxing is Common Sense

Offie Wortham

Apr 14, 2014

    

It is estimated that today (2014), some 93 per cent of American teenagers are online and 75 per cent use mobile phones, according to figures from the Pew Internet & American Life Project. Marketing data shows that 92 per cent of teens own an iPod or MP3 player, while upward of two-thirds own their own computer (and access to one at home is near-universal). These researchers calculated that the average American teenager was spending 8.5 hours a day in some form of mass-mediated interaction. It is an environment: pervasive, invisible, shrink-wrapped around pretty much everything children do and say and think.


This past July, a highly regarded research team from Sweden led by Dr. Lennart Hardell reported that the risks of developing a tumor on the hearing nerve from using cellphones regularly for more than two decades are greater than previously reported. It is important to note that the Hardell team is also the only team that has reported on the risk of acoustic neuroma from cordless phone use along with cell phones, as cordless phones emit microwave radiation just like cell phones.


Last summer, a team of psychologists from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and the University of Leuven in Belgium found that Facebook use correlated with a low sense of well-being. “The more people used Facebook over two-weeks, the more their life satisfaction levels declined over time,” they said. “Rather than enhancing well-being… these findings suggest that Facebook may undermine it.” If you're feeling bummed, researchers did test for and find a solution. The prescription for Facebook despair is less Facebook. Researchers found that face-to-face or phone interaction — those outmoded, analog ways of communication — had the opposite effect. Direct interactions with other human beings led people to feel better.


Do some of you think it is time to take the iPad away from your kid? In the U.K., a four-year-old girl believed to be the country’s youngest iPad addict has been getting treatment at a rehab center specializing in digital addiction. The Canadian Pediatric Society says kids younger than two should not be indulging in any screen-based activities, including TV, computer, and mobile devices. The association recommends older kids spend no more than one or two hours a day glued to a screen. Cris Rowan, a pediatric occupational therapist, said kids today are in front of screens four to five times that amount. “Overuse is an issue,” she said. “Tech is very addicting. Never in the history of humankind do we have kids with addictions, and now one in 11 kids (age eight to 18) are addicted to technology. This is the tip of the iceberg here.”

Vancouver psychologist Dr. Joti Samra writes that the children are losing social development that’s important, like non-verbal communication and physical interaction. Kids brought up with iPads and their one-swipe access could also fail to learn about delayed gratification, she said. “You put something in front of a child that can easily access everything they want or need, that important life skill is not being fostered in the way it would be.”

Read More ➤ To discover The Vermont Device Detox Weekend Retreat Click this link

 

Monkey’s Cloak

2 Good Friday Poems



For Grace

Ian Turnbull


Such a filthy man, to be washed clean
Such a broken vessel, to be made anew
Such a wicked man, to have his sins forgiven
Such a cynical man, given faith in you

For grace I could never deserve
Your body was broken for me
For peace I cannot comprehend
Your blood was spilt for me


All So We Wouldn’t Cry Alone

Terri Kneipp


In the darkest hour

When the pain was hardest to bear

Thanks was still freely given

The body beaten beyond compare.

All so we wouldn’t cry alone.


To think of all He gave

My eyes well up with tears.

The weight no mortal man could take

Beaten, scorned, the crowd shouting jeers

All so we wouldn’t cry alone.

Read More ➤