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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

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Patrick Leahy


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Special Feature

“Virtually There”

Part 3 — West Penwith to The Mount




Rugged and Romantic, entering the landscape of the Newlyn School


The next village is Penberth, then a series of bays are separated by the headlands of Merthen Point, Boscawen Point, and Tater Du with its lighthouse built in 1965. Lamorna Cove is a favourite with artists such as S. J. "Lamorna" Birch, see illus.] who lived there in a small cottage. Then, after rounding Carn Du, the path turns northwards towards Mousehole and Penlee Point. This section of the path follows a road into Newlyn, but a diversion via Paul allows walkers to follow a quieter inland path. Newlyn has a busy fishing harbour and is again favoured by artists, known as the Newlyn School.


The Newlyn School was an art colony of artists based in or near Newlyn, a fishing village adjacent to Penzance, Cornwall, from the 1880s until the early twentieth century. The establishment of the Newlyn School was reminiscent of the Barbizon School in France, where artists fled Paris to paint in a more pure setting emphasizing natural light. These schools along with a related California movement were also known as En plein air.


Newlyn had a number of things guaranteed to attract artists: fantastic light, cheap living, and the availability of inexpensive models. The artists were fascinated by the fishermen's working life at sea and the everyday life in the harbour and nearby
villages. Some paintings showed the hazards and tragedy of the community's life, such as women anxiously looking out to sea as the boats go out, or a young woman crying on hearing news of a disaster. Lamorna Birch was the prime mover behind the colony and the work done there. The later Forbes School of Painting, founded by Stanhope Forbes and his wife Elizabeth in 1899, promoted the study of figure painting. A present day Newlyn School of Art was formed in 2011 with Arts Council funding providing art courses taught by many of the best-known artists working in Cornwall today.


In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Lamorna, a nearby fishing village to the south, became popular with artists of the Newlyn School and is particularly associated with the artist S. J. "Lamorna" Birch who lived there from 1908.


[illus. right; St Mary’s Church, Penzance]


Until recently, there was little evidence for anything but an early and short Roman occupation of Cornwall. The fort at Nanstallon was occupied from AD 54 to AD 80. With the recent discovery of a Roman fort at Calstock, and a site with multiple complexes near the Norman castle at Restormel, now tentatively accepted as being occupied from AD 54 into the 3rd or 4th century in east Cornwall, the Roman occupation appears more extensive than archaeologists formerly believed.[10] The only evidence so far found, of the Romans in Penzance, are three finds. In August 1899 two coins of Vespasian (69–79 AD) were found in an ancient trench in Penzance Cemetery. The coins were eight feet below ground together with some cow bones, and are now in the Penlee House Museum. A 1934 find from the Alverton area is described as a ″coin of the reign of Constantine the Great″, and was also donated to the museum.


The path now follows the promenade through the town, passing Penzance railway station and continuing past the railway engine shed along the shore of Mount's Bay with its views of St Michael's Mount. This is an island at high tide but can be reached from Marazion by a causeway at low tide.


St Michael's Mount (Cornish: Karrek Loos yn Koos, (Carrek Los yn Cos), meaning "hoar rock in woodland", also known colloquially by locals as simply the Mount is a small tidal island in Mount's Bay, Cornwall, United Kingdom. The island is a civil parish and is linked to the town of Marazion by a man-made causeway of granite setts, passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust, and the castle and chapel have been the home of the St Aubyn family since approximately 1650. The earliest buildings, on the summit, date to the 12th century, the harbour is 15th century and the village and summit buildings were rebuilt from 1860 to 1900, to give the island its current form.


Its Cornish language name — literally, "the grey rock in a wood" — may represent a folk memory of a time before Mount's Bay was flooded, indicating a description of the Mount set in woodland. Remains of trees have been seen at low tides following storms on the beach at Perranuthnoe, but radiocarbon dating established the submerging of the hazel wood at about 1700 BC.



< These are extracts from the full article > Read More ➤


Weekly Feature

Iona Iona! Mother of Dreams



Iona is the “motherland of dreams”, the ethereal ground of imagination and ground zero of Druid culture. Its spell draws us into its center. Iona’s old Gaelic name Innis nan Druidhneach translates as the Island of the Druids. Their motto was Y Gwir Erbyn Y Byd (“Truth Against the World”). These Servants of Truth held greater power than the kings who took advice from them: All of nature was sacred to them and they were its students and stewards.

The first woman’s church was founded here, on I, hence ‘Ey-brides’ after the pre-christian presence of Bride, 360 stones around the site before any Christian presence as represented by the ‘Johannine’ St. Columba.


Among other names for the island one is Ì nam ban bòidheach ("the isle of beautiful women").


I means island. And all the western seas around northwest Scotland seem to those they have been there as islands out of time. The Druid Islands as they were known until just recently, but nothing dark here about Druid culture. Instead this reference to the 260 stones which is also noticed in other religions such as the Muslim one, the Kaaba being surrounded with 260 stones. On I, or Iona, the stones were each one carved.


Johannine versions of Christianity are in accord with nature, rather than in accord with Rome, so to speak. Even the equal armed Celtic cross preceded the Christian cross by 1,000 years, and was not an image of torture, but of forces intersecting.

The Book of Kells - Gospel of John


In the early Historic Period Iona lay within the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata. The island was the site of a highly important monastery (see Iona Abbey) during the Early Middle Ages. According to tradition the monastery was founded in 563 by the monk Columba, also known as Colm Cille, who had been exiled from his native Ireland as a result of his involvement in the Battle of Cul Dreimhne. Columba and twelve companions went into exile on Iona, then part of the Irish kingdom of Dál Riata, and founded a monastery there. The monastery was hugely successful, and played a crucial role in the conversion to Christianity of the Picts of present-day Scotland in the late 6th century and of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria in 635. A large number of satellite institutions were founded, and Iona became the centre of one of the most important monastic systems in Great Britain and Ireland.


Iona quickly became a renowned center of learning, and its scriptorium produced highly important documents, likely including the original texts of the Iona Chronicle, thought to be the source for the early Irish annals. The monastery is often associated with the distinctive practices and traditions known as Celtic Christianity. In particular, Iona was a major supporter of the "Celtic" system for calculating the date of Easter during the time of the Easter controversy, which pitted supporters of the Celtic system against those favoring the "Roman" system used elsewhere in Western Christianity. The controversy weakened Iona's ties to Northumbria, which adopted the Roman system at the Synod of Whitby in 664, and to Pictland, which followed suit in the early 8th century. Iona itself did not adopt the Roman system until 715, according to the Anglo-Saxon historian Bede. Iona's prominence was further diminished over the next centuries as a result of Viking raids and the rise of other powerful monasteries in the system, such as the Abbey of Kells.


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Publisher’s Challenge

Challenge #6




Publisher’s Challenge


Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here


Selected responses will appear in this column.


Challenge #6

Oct 15, 2014


Hemingway as editor


Apart from some informal work for F. Scott, Ernest avoided editing, except of his own material where he was famous for extirpating adjectives. ‘Wipe them out,’ he thundered.


This challenge is to find and forward a piece of your own writing, between 100 and 400 words all adjectives eliminated.

Can be prose or poetry.



View Contributions to this

and other Challenges


Guest Article


Fog on the River


[a text inspired by an image]


Terri Kneipp




Fog on the river

The morning arriving with a chill

Slowly climbing out of bed

Tentatively putting feet to the hard, cold floor

Sun streaming in the window

Spider dangling from his web

An unsuspecting multi-colored leaf caught in the intricate weaving

Dangling, suspended in the air

The first signs of fall appearing


Fog on the mountain

Driving down the highway vibrant colors to behold

Slow going as the thickness swallows

Sounds of geese moving on for the season

Leaving for their seasonal home

Startling the silence of the early morning


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Non Profit of the Month

Turning Point

People passing through downtown Brattleboro the last few months have been captivated by the bustle of construction activity and excavation at the corner of Elm and Flat streets. The Turning Point recovery center is restoring the 39 Elm Street property, severely damaged in Tropical Storm Irene, to use as our new permanent facility for serving our local recovery community. This restored and renovated building will give us a downtown home again, we hope before the year is out. This relocation brings us back closer to the community of people we serve. We love the idea that this building will experience a renaissance of its own while center guests enjoy their own personal recoveries from addictions. Our new home also brings us full circle, back to Elm Street where our story began more than seven years ago.


Our volunteer-led center has served this community since late 2006 as one of eleven linked yet independent recovery centers in Vermont, affiliated through the Vermont Recovery Network. Some guests go through treatment programs, and some have histories with the correctional system due to their addictions. Others find recovery through 12-step and other supportive, spiritual programs. Last year, guests made about 7,690 visits to our Center. About 6,550 were drop-in guests seeking peer support or a sober environment; about 1,140 attended 12-step and other mutual support groups. Attendance in programming has steadily increased as we have added services, although our visits dropped significantly after leaving our downtown location.


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Vermont Diary


A Schorr Thing



Every year Dan Schorr put up an end of year article assessing what advances there had been over the previous year. Dan was catholic about it, though year after year he, being perhaps the best journalist in the USA, was puzzled on what to report in the period leading up to the millennium. Did we advance or did we slip back? Overall I think it is fair to this of this very fair man, of his writing over a decade of these things, that at end there was not considerable progress since his beginning.


It’s tough saying this to folks, a turn off to the flighty, but objectively he spoke true, things, every matter of things, had not improved.


Famous for not revealing a source before a select committee of Congress, and risking indefinite incarceration thereby, Schorr was not kinder to left nor right.


At end I think he regretted having to say the bad news year after year, since who could like him for saying that nothing much happened after billions spent and expectations of progress were all the news contained?


“Come to think of it”, was the title of his book about what he recorded in the decade leading up to the millennium, and his annual assessment of things stood far apart from the usual ‘year in review’ report. It was more ‘culture in review’ and it was not nearly so happy as other reporting on the year; but it was for grown ups.


Schorr attracted the anger of the Nixon White House. In 1971, after a dispute with White House aides, Schorr's friends, neighbors, and co-workers were questioned by the FBI about his habits. They were told that Schorr was under consideration for a high-level position in the environmental area. Schorr knew nothing about it. Later, during the Watergate hearings, it was revealed that Nixon aides had drawn up what became known as Nixon's Enemies List, and Daniel Schorr was on that list. Famously, Schorr read the list aloud on live TV, surprised to be reading his own name in that context. Schorr won Emmys for news reporting in 1972, 1973, and 1974.


Schorr provoked intense controversy in 1976 when he received and made public the contents of the secret Pike Committee report on illegal CIA and FBI activities. Called to testify before Congress, he refused to identify his source on First Amendment grounds, risking imprisonment. This did not mollify CBS executives, and Schorr ultimately resigned from his position at CBS in September 1976.


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Monthly Feature


William Hays, print maker


A visit with William Hays in his studio in Brattleboro. To accompany this article the current print he is working on now appears in a 7 stage slide show at Studio 3, click the link and press ‘play slideshow’.


I had previously interviewed the subject for an hour on January 21, 2011 almost exactly 3 years ago. Readers might like to read the transcript here. Then we progressed from art to the universe and all that.


This time we conspired to be more disciplined and attempt to illustrate a print in progress and something of the nature of the art.


Where better to start than with the inks themselves? An immediate question I had was if the materials the artist used were generally the same as had Gutenberg (c. 1395 – February 3, 1468)? And they were. Stand oil, I discovered, is a base for the ink made from linseed oil thickened by heating in an oxygen deprived chamber, and linseed comes from flax and is a good drying oil for a process known as polymerizing.

Extracts Read More ➤


Selected Letters

Addressing racial bias in Vermont law enforcement


Curtiss Reed, Jr.

Jan 22, 2015

 

Brattleboro. In spite of Vermont’s recent designation as the safest state in the nation by Yahoo Homes, events in Ferguson, Staten Island, Cleveland and elsewhere across the nation has many Vermonters wondering about racial bias in Vermont law enforcement. Where there is scant information the tendency is to fill the void with whatever the prevailing negative narrative might be. This commentary offers to fill that void with a brief retrospective on how Vermont State Police (VSP) leadership has been shaping a more responsive, culturally competent agency. More so than any other state agency, Vermont State Police has demonstrated conspicuously courageous leadership in the areas of bias reduction and cultural competency.

 

A decade ago Col. James Baker, then director of the Vermont State Police, came to my office unannounced to discuss our published study on Brattleboro’s minority community perceptions of law enforcement. Unlike other law enforcement leadership who sought to dispute our research findings of perceived racial profiling and bias, or to challenge our research methodology, or to question the motives or credibility of our community organization, Col. Baker had another agenda.

 

Col. Baker came to find out what we thought he could do to increase trust between minority communities and law enforcement in general and VSP, in particular. Rather than discount the experiences of people of color he took our conversations to reflect on the agency’s history and his own upbringing, biases, and prejudices.


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Monkey’s Cloak

Live



Michael Cioffi


I’m sorry about everything, dear
Sorry that the lillies never blossomed this year Sorry that everything changed

I’m sorry about everything, dear
That George W. Bush got re-elected And Johnny got deployed
I’m sorry that you didn’t listen when I said no Maybe I never did say it out loud

I’m sorry that you’ll never get to hear his voice, even for a second That sweet voice: ‘I love you mom’

He was special, our boy, he was
I know you can’t look at me anymore, and for that, too, I am sorry

I hope you see him in your dreams
I hope you dream of a time when my apologies had not yet existed Live there
Live in that dream



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DUSTY DEATH (Part 1)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014




And all our yesterdays have lighted fools

The way to dusty death. ~ Shakespeare


From an early age I have gravitated toward graveyards, where, despite my obsessive fear of death, I feel soothed by their remote air of melancholy and immense, incorruptible silence. I have felt drawn to graveyards for different reasons during different stages of my life.  As a teenager with a Gothic streak, I went to them to brood, particularly on moody, windswept, overcast days.


Over the years, graveyards became settings for picnics, moonlit walks and an instinctual search for stories as I puttered from stone to stone piecing together lost lives out of dates, inscriptions, relationships and life spans. In middle age I took to practicing tai chi among the dead at sunrise.


Recently, while doing volunteer work at the Brattleboro Historical Society, the woman responsible for cutting and pasting obituaries from the Brattleboro Reformer into notebooks piqued my interest with her comments on how drastically the language in obituaries had changed over the years. I started leafing through the notebooks and quickly found myself drawn in by the same eerie fascination that drives me to cemeteries.


But it was not the later obituaries that I read with such total attention, most of which are terse and dry accounts, as though the less said the better. I became engrossed in the obituaries written before 1940. One can’t help noticing that after mid-century the reports of people’s death begin to shed their intimate nature.


Language reveals the medical sense and sensibilities of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Often a person did not die; he or she “succumbed.” The given causes of death sound archaic: Acute dilation of the heart. Apoplectic shock. Convulsions and infections. Malignant typhoid fever complicated by pneumonia. A painful affection of the heart. Intestinal grip.

Often we hear only that death was caused by shock. One man died very suddenly of “heart attack caused by acute indigestion” (is that even possible?) Others died more slowly from ”infirmities due to advanced years” or “a general breaking down.” One woman, before succumbing in 1888, had suffered from “general prostration for quite some time.”


General prostration? A general breaking down? I’m not familiar with these terms as pathways to mortality. However, what I find most striking about these obituaries is not the terminology, but their immediacy and narrative sense. Page after page includes details that are personal, private and impressively poignant.


The tragic accidental death in 1937 of young William Holbrook, whose family occupied the former home of Rudyard Kipling, sounds more suited to a tabloid than a staid community paper.


Holbrook Boy, 7, Drowns in Pool. This headline is followed by a series of downward spiraling subheads: Body of William Found Underwater at Naulahka/Ninety-Minute Fight of Fireman in Vain/Last Missed by Father/Search Reveals Tragedy/Tiny Boats Found Floating Nearby/ Mother on Trip. Not Yet Located.


Really? Tiny boats found floating nearby?


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Column Untitled Work

Letter from Costa Rica


This essay was written during a brief stint teaching writing to Landmark students during a study abroad trip to Costa Rica earlier in January.

Mac Gander

Jan 25, 2015


I wake at dawn most mornings in Monteverde. It seems foolish not to, with so much strange and unfamiliar beauty surrounding one, and the promise of strong fresh coffee waiting on a table near the bed. Today is the last dawn I will wake here—we leave for the Caribbean coast in a couple of hours. As always, the sky is grey with low misty clouds, and the air is cool and mild, wind gusting and settling again in the trees, shaking the branches.


I’ve always been fascinated by the notion, which I find best expressed in one of Borges’ short pieces, that it is not infrequent in life that one does something for the last time, often not aware of it until later, if ever. Today I know that this is the last time I will wake at dawn in Monteverde—that even were I to return to this place, it would be a different place, a different trip, and I would be different, too.


Photo caption: Sunset in Monteverde


In this piece of Borges that I am remembering, he describes running into an acquaintance of his at sunset on an avenue in Buenos Aires, and talking for a while, then parting with the promise that they would see one another soon again. He watches her walk away in the late light, waving to her, not knowing, he says, that the broad avenue she crossed was actually the River Styx, since she would die soon after and he would never see her again.


Nothing so melancholy as that today, of course—we’re all anxious to get to the beach, and I am sure our 8-hour bus-ride will be filled with laughter and occasional complaints, filled with life. Still, it is interesting to come to the end of one’s time in an unfamiliar and compelling place.


Yesterday I walked with some students along a tree-top path through a reserve in Monteverde, eight bridges crossing rivers as we walked, putting us into the jungle canopy at times. In a way, we were walking through the jungle, surrounded by dense flora and fauna, but the path was broad and well-paved, and if one looked to either side, into the jungle itself, one could see that none of us had any idea of what it would actually be like, to try to make passage through the thick vines and undergrowth and uneven terrain.

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Column 4our

Writers:   Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Fallout

Nanci Bern

Jan 23, 2015


Fallout: the debris from an explosion, the remnant of an action long past and finally, the silent remains of the unresolved. These are the ones that bear the most complexity. These are the ones that seed themselves in our souls even though we walk with resolute steps.

 

To give a relationship energy that cannot be changed, although our hearts are willing to explore the possibility, means that it must be met with the gaze of the other. If this doesn’t occur then just because we choose not to inhabit that emotional place because we do understand, in our minds, that there is nothing left to be done, does not always mean that the brash colors of loss will be blanched by time.


Years ago, before I had settled into the work I now inhabit, I did something else. This is no surprise. Most of us have been many things before finding our ‘one’ or, a number of ‘one’ soul home thing. But that had not happened at the time. However, surprisingly enough, I was quite good at what I was doing and became a mentor for more than a few people. I was known for my openness, professional generosity and ethics in a field that has many grey areas where the ethical is concerned. The Ethics of Ambiguity is right at home here. While we all worked hard and seriously, we also enjoyed ourselves with each other in the same way.


But things can sometimes go terribly wrong, or at least seriously blandished with misinterpretation that forges its way into intractability toward understanding. When mixed with a yet immature attitude toward life, let alone the ‘adult’ world of business, no blacksmith could rework what this fire had wrought. There was no fixing this. I had become the villain despite other’s opinions as well. And so a relationship that was a steady stream of connection, warmth and growth was stunted by a closed and recalcitrant young woman who clearly felt betrayed.


Although forgiveness was not what I deemed I needed, I offered her the chance. I framed my apology in terms of a wider picture but she demanded the particular. The best I could do was to apologize for the fact that what transpired, although done ethically, did not yield the outcome she felt she deserved and I was sorry for her disappointment. It was not enough and I was dismissed from her life. She moved from the area soon after. I moved on and while I acknowledged my sadness I did not especially mourn because frankly, I was emotionally exhausted and felt I had done everything I could to be done. But affection and human regard, nonetheless remained.


This past August, after many years, I began to think about her. I needed to find her. I tried all the social channels yet found nothing. I thought that odd. So there was nothing to do then hope she was well and happy. But that for some reason did not feel right.


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Column Articulate

The order of chaos

Kate Anderson

Dec 1, 2014

      

Artspace MN

The one thing that consistently separates creative placemaking from other practices is the participation of artists, both in planning and execution. This is not a superficial distinction, but a fundamental one because artists approach challenges differently than most people, and at the heart of that difference is the willingness of artists to embrace chaos. While most of us are trying to create order, artists tend to have a greater comfort level letting things get messy, not obliging them to make immediate sense, and following inspiration even when it pushes against reason. This is why art constantly breaks new ground, and why creative placemaking can generate original solutions to enduring challenges. “The art of creative placemaking” is the capacity to marry this chaotic artistic energy with diverse, complex public agendas and the skills necessary to execute work in the public sphere."


I subscribe to this thinking.  Embracing chaos does not mean pedestalizing chaos, but it perhaps means walking into an area with no paths, no clear escape routes --- and that implies some sense of faith that the wilderness experience (or hell for some) is not concomitant with chaos. This chaos is beyond the edge of predictability where curiosity stewarded by mindfulness, innovation, intuition, and a ready creative impulse still flags with a sometimes weak and hidden arm.  Hidden because, aren't  we are more comfortable with order, with rules. 

But are we.

 

Or do we learn to be more comfortable with steady order.

 

Like a difficult news image -- we turn our heads from disrupting chaos.


Don't look.


[caption: Image in chalk by Laura Momaney]


Ah, there it is. If we look, we may be motivated.   Motivation and status quo are uneasy co-workers in our souls. The above paragraph is Einstein's observation, paraphrased, the same thinking that made the problems is not the thinking to solve the problems.   Status quo works like inertia, what incredible strength to keep going down paths assigned.  Please stop contradicting the dictums.  Please.  Well, if please doesn't get results then coercion.  Yes, we can muster enough. 

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This column is sponsored by Friends of the Sun


Column Open Mind

In What Direction Would Dr. King

Be Leading His Followers Today?

Offie Wortham

Dec 30, 2014





In the fall of 1981 the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Social Change opened in Atlanta. Dr. King’s widow, Coretta Scott King, asked me to conduct the first workshop. She wanted me to talk about where “Martin” would be leading the movement if he were alive. This was such a tremendous responsibility. The world had undergone enormous cultural and social change since 1968, and I was expected to do my own research, make a major speech, and then answer questions.


In preparing for the workshop I read the last few speeches of Dr. King, and I also read the two last speeches of Malcolm X, with whom I had spent some private time. Dr. King and Malcolm X were coming closer together in their world views. Malcolm was becoming less radical, while Dr. King was becoming more critical of the foreign and domestic policies of the country.


I had also recently read The Third Wave, by Alvin Toffler, where he put forth the assertion that Industrialism was the greatest threat to mankind, not racism.  I was sure that not only would Dr. King have read Toffler’s book and shared his thinking, but also that Dr. King would have identified and preached against the implications of the evils of consumerism and materialism, which are dangers Pope Francis now preaches against world-wide.


His message was similar to voices today that say that the present government is wasting billions abroad while cutting domestic programs in every state and county nationwide.


Anyone who opposed the foreign policy of the government was considered unpatriotic and a disloyal citizen …


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Beyond the Horizon

Tasneem Tawfeek

Nov 17, 2014


Gazing outdoors from the inside of my home, under the comfort of my own covers, I often find myself pondering about the very issues that trouble me when it comes to the environment. The colors and views before me that accompany every season and every time of day- whether dawn, noon, or dusk, seem to speak volumes to me and I continue to wonder on the surrounding nature whose primary purpose is to soothe and comfort. I continue to speculate, I continue to question, I continue to wonder, and as I often stare upon the horizon especially as the sun sets, I continue to reflect beyond it. I continue to marvel at the spectrum of colors that our horizon lends to us at any moment of time and it seems that if we ask questions beyond our own horizon and attempt to see past the obvious limits before us, we will continue to realize that our environment needs more attention and raising awareness is the most crucial step in acquiring this attention. It seems that the horizon of our atmosphere serves as yet another focal point for concern and we can continue to remain voiceless or we can look beyond for solutions that will ultimately lead to a healthier planet, a healthier home, and a healthier horizon for us all.


Just recently, I began to better understand the issue of our ozone layer and the impact that ozone depletion has on the future scope of our planet. However, what exactly is the ozone layer and how does ozone depletion affect us? For starters, ozone depletion just happens to be one of the most troubling worldwide environmental problems. We may know the basics- that the Earth's atmosphere is divided into several layers, with each one serving an important role. The troposphere is where human activities take place such as flying small aircrafts or flying in hot air balloons. The next layer is called the stratosphere and it is in this layer in which the ozone layer of our Earth is found. The job of the ozone layer is to protect our planet from the dangerous UV rays of the sun. If not protected, the Earth could face some disastrous effects. Unfortunately, our current issue with the ozone layer is that it is slowly being depleted, being worn out, as a result of human actions, particularly as a result of substances being manufactured by certain industries.


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The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014

                                                                        

Avid readers find themselves drawn to a book even though they are not familiar with the writer’s work or subject matter. Oddly enough, insights gleaned from that book relate precisely to the reader’s current circumstance and or/ questions. The brain works by physical connections. Memory works by connection.  People work by connection too. We are not isolated from others. Writers, painters, biologists, physicists arrive at similar theories although they have no connection with one another’s work and reside at opposite sides of the earth. We are all moving to a higher level of consciousness and if a piece of new information facilitates that process, it is vital to convey it to others even if they do not wish to hear it or accept it.


Dr.Rollo May, the famous psychoanalyst, in his book titled The Courage to Create points out that innovative creative thinkers have always been a threat to established society because the new ideas they champion destroy the structure and conventions of the established society. Picasso is quoted as having said that” to create means first to destroy.” We cannot forget those who have been crucified for ideas that challenged the norms of their times. The list is endless.  Although the individual is burnt at the stake or crucified, the idea he/she proposed, the vision remains intact and blooms like a flower over centuries.  Apes do not have a Jesus Christ or Joan of Arc.


Dr.Rollo May was fascinated with the creative process and the work produced through the fusion of the conscious and unconscious. He speaks of the “heightened consciousness” experienced when one is immersed in the act of creation: the feeling of floating suspended in time, the lack of appetite, the increase of heartbeat, the intense concentration, the sheer joy as if one were flying; indeed, one is released temporarily from our conception of time and space that Einstein regarded as illusion or our way of coping with our short life span by dividing time into past, present, and future. We cannot travel at the speed of light while here in our bodies on earth, but the artist and writer in the act of creation feels he/ she moves at the speed of light. Everything that has been muddied or dim is suddenly clarified and abnormally vivid: long buried memoires surface as if they are occurring now. Ideas that seemed vastly different form solid rational connections.


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Column in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 15, 2014


Today I had the first Open House event at Golgonooza Letter Foundry & Press since losing my partner, Dan Carr. I did not know whether anyone would make the effort to come because of the weather, and I was prepared for a small turnout, having no idea who would come. That morning, as I made homemade eggnog with the fresh glass bottled milk from local Manning Hill Farm, I tried to keep up with all that needed doing by myself, crossing off items one by one on my to do list. People arrived throughout the afternoon despite the light  but steady snowfall, and I found myself surprised by each person that crossed my threshold and felt blessed by their presence. The love and caring they brought, their open hearts waiting to be warmed, deeply touched me and opened my own heart.


The absence of one person so very much a part of this place is something I never forget; it is as if the invisible world that we cannot describe opens up—that place of feeling, which is indeed the real place we live in. Whether a loved one is here or now only within us, this depth of the experience of loss, this acute awareness of the preciousness of this life—of these people, of these moments—is a thing to value.


I had the experience a few days ago, of thinking with my brain “oh, what really is this season of the holidays?” feeling ambiguous about its meaning—as if it is really just a different season, nothing that special in actual fact—then my feelings spoke up and answered to my thinking brain—that this season is a time when we as flawed and sometimes broken humans reach out to make efforts to bring others cheer, joy, happiness and comfort (ideally) and that this effort is something—in light of the short space of time we have here on earth—where we try to be in touch with our best selves. How can that be wrong or trite at its root? The beauty of simple generosity, caring and love, are some of our best attributes when expressed with truth and honesty.


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Column Beer & Bangers

On the Road: A Visit to J.D McCliment’s Pub and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Terri Kneipp

Jun 30, 2014


The Beer & Bangers crew has been adventurous venturing far from their usual confines of the Big B into such foreign territory as Putney and Chester, VT.  The crew chooses locations based on the possibilities of either a good selection of brews and grub from past personal experience, word of mouth or sheer luck of stumbling upon an establishment. Not all who participate enjoy beer, so other beverages are explored including wine, cocktails and good ole ice tea being a connoisseur of the latter myself still learning the finer nuances of the heartier brews.


J.D. McCliment’s Pub (http://www.jdmcclimentspub.com/) in Putney is well established with a steady stream of customers, both local and visitors. Along with a casual, indoor dining area with a pool table upstairs, weather permitting there is an inviting outdoor deck. The beer selection was minimal with mostly bottled domestic beers with a Shale being one exception which was excellent. Ice tea was freshly brewed and decent, nothing exciting but fine. Now, the meat of the meal, so to speak, received mixed reviews. The Turkey Burger was thought good with the Ruben being perfectly acceptable. After that there was debate, one member thought the Fish and Chips fine, while one indicated the fish was over cooked. The Bratwurst was passable, but would not be had again with the Corned Beef being too salty. Overall the atmosphere was pleasant with adequate service, albeit slow which seems to be the rule in local pubs rather than the exception. The crew agreed they might to go back to enjoy an evening outside with lively conversation and a beverage of choice where food wasn’t the focus but accessible. It was noted that an authentic Scottish pub it was not; for that, one need only head to Chester.


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A Modern Modest Proposal  number10

Jeri Rose

Jan 11, 2015


I am tired of the mass agreement that has laid down these put downs...I like mimes, anchovies, street musicians, people named Donald who want to be called Donald, and puns. Bud gives me a headache, but leaf makes me smile. I do not understand why any woman would wear high heels to pander to men liking their butts sticking out. I like long hair and beards on men. And on women too...wear it proudly if you got it ladies. I like bald men with long hair. Nipple rings and animals smashed on the road make me cringe. If I had power, I would never make a law about any of these things.


However, I notice that there are over 7 billion people on the planet and they all want to eat, drive cars, live in a home. They want stuff. The Chinese government noticed that they had a lot of people. They wanted to keep that number from increasing due to the misery attendant with the inability of the country to feed its children. The forced abortions and other problems that this policy placed on the Chinese people makes us cringe at the loss of personal freedom it represents. I hate the idea of government interfering in something so intimate and personal. AND YET…


I have a modest proposal…that I am rather more serious about than Swift was about eating babies. What if…all men at their entrance into puberty were to make a few deposits into a sperm bank and then get a vasectomy. The result would be no more unwanted unplanned pregnancies. As long as a man was careful about who he had sex with to prevent disease, he would not need to ever undergo the discomfort and loss of sensation of wearing a condom. Women would not have to take hormones to prevent their eggs from passing into the uterus.


Were the government to get behind this, a man would get to make two withdrawals in order to have a replacement value of himself and his partner. Thus the population would not increase and the human race would stabilize at the number we are presently struggling to maintain. Our science would catch up with this number as we became more efficient at how we recycle, and how we use the resources of the planet. Of course using solar, wind, hemp would all factor into this renewal of our ability to live in balance with the reality of a finite earth that is also fertile and abundant.


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Column Chess

Never Back Down in the King’s Gambit

Phil Innes

Jan 18, 2015



The ‘wisdom’ about playing the King’s Gambit is ‘never back down’, so here is the ‘kitchen sink’ attack, an unofficial variation, and, to mix metaphors, welcome to the Wild West.

White: Chess One 2202

Black: Barclays 1747

Correspondence game, Jan 2015


1.e4e5

2.f4exf4

3.Nf3f5

4.e5g5

5.d4g4

6.Bxf4gxf3


And there it is, a knight sacrifice for ‘only’ strategic advantage, but it does give me, the White player, a lot of initiative, another 14 moves of it, or at least, having come to the end of my book knowledge with the next move, I certainly hoped so!


7.Qxf3h5

8.Bc4Ne7

9.Nc3Ng6

10.O-Oc6

11.Rae1Bb4

12.d5c5


If you are up material you should try to exchange pieces, on the other hand in this scenario you will be trading your  only active pieces to do so. The sacrificed Knight is at this stage of the game equal to all Black’s queenside of inactive Rook, Knight and Bishop. The thing to do is to keep pushing, never back down, so…


13.e6d6


Even so, White’s breakthrough play must be decisive in order to win and if only the f4 bishop was not in the way, the Queen could invade decisively, so how to move it without losing a tempo allowing Black to consolidate. Sacrifice it, but first, the other white bishop gets into the action… and I ask the reader to believe that this is a calculated variation.


  1. 14.Bb5+Kf8 Diagram.




Read on for the denouement.

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Column Energetics  US and World Energy News

George Harvey   

¶ who is stopping us?


September 24 Energy News


Opinion:

¶   “300,000-Plus People March for Climate Action, In Pictures” The Sunday morning rush hour is not usually known for packing people into subway cars like sardines. But September 21, 2014 was not your average Sunday commute as hundreds of thousands showed up for the People’s Climate March. [Scientific American]


¶   “A strong economy depends on climate action” When we act on climate, we seize an opportunity to retool and resurge with new technologies, new industries and new jobs. We owe it to our kids not just to act, but to lead. When we do, we’ll leave them a cleaner, safer and opportunity-rich world for generations to come. [The Hill]


¶   “Climate action – who is stopping us?” Fossil fuel industries are the only obstacle to a safe future and a stable climate, says Greenpeace International executive director Kumi Naidoo. But even the rich in industrialized countries know that they can’t hide from devastating climate change in their gated communities. [eco-business.com]


Science and Technology:

¶   Growing use of natural gas fails to benefit the environment because it slows the spread of renewable energy sources, according to a study released today. While natural gas releases less carbon dioxide than coal when burned to produce electricity, it hampers growth of cleaner energy such as wind and solar. [Mynextfone]



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Column O Citoyen!


NOT Citizens' Breakfast

Robert Oeser

Nov 29, 2014


There will not be a Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast in either November or December; see you in 2015! 


If you ever wish to review or research past Breakfast presentations, an index can be found at this link: http://bit.ly/YkYQBx


While Not Breakfasts , the following events will be hosted at Senior Meals at the Gibson-Aiken Center:


On Wednesday December 3 at 12 noon   t here will be a "Lunch with the Chief," newly appointed Brattleboro Police Chief Michael Fitzgerald. The suggested donation for lunch is $6.00 ($3.50 for those over 60.) RSVP - 257-7570

On Saturday, December 20, at 5:00pm, there will be a free "Seniors' Holiday Dinner" with US Senator Bernie Sanders. RSVP by Friday, December 12 by calling either 1-800-339-9834 or 802-257-7570. Free transportation provided for Brattleboro Housing Authority residents .  


Other items of interest:


There is a movement afoot to encourage VT Attorney General Sorrell to join in with or otherwise support several jurisdictions (the State of Kentucky, the City of Chicago and the California counties of Orange and Santa Clara) who are suing pharmaceutical manufacturers under the theory that their aggressive marketing of synthetic opioids (e.g., Oxycontin) has resulted in spiraling addiction, health care costs and deaths.


Do you know who Jonathan Gruber is?  “What about that Obamacare guy who says the American people are stupid?” If you haven't been following the story, consider this analysis:   Read The Price of Ignorance.  


Read More ➤


TD Bank Campaign Continues with Upstate Activists


Tim Stevenson

Jan 6, 2015
   

Continuing with its practice of hosting a weekly vigil at the Brattleboro branch ot TD Bank, the Climate Change Café project of Post Oil Solutions will welcome members of the Upper Valley Keystone XL Affinity Group to join with them in front of the bank this Friday, January 2, from noon to 1 PM, and then to be part of the meeting we will have at the River Garden  after the vigil.

 

The Upper Valley folks have been holding similar actions periodically  at the Montpelier main bank office. They share our concern about the fact that the TD Bank Group, a giant global network of financial institutions owned by Toronto-Dominion, is heavily invested in TransCanada which, along with other tar sand projects, would build the Keystone XL pipeline, as well as other pipelines to transport gas that has been extracted by fracking. One of these is proposed to run through Chittenden and Addison Counties and under Lake Ticonderoga.

 

Our actions arise from what we see as a need to bring to our fellow citizens attention the fact that:

Tar sands oil is extracted, processed and transported in a more environmentally destructive way than any other petroleum.

There is overwhelming scientific consensus that unless most fossil fuels remain in the ground,unburned we face unbearable climate disaster.

Greenhouse gas emissions in the process of getting oil out of tar sands, from strip mining to delivering gasoline to an automobile’s tank, are 81 percent greater than for the average crude refined in the U.S.

If fully developed, the Alberta tar sands deposits would release a large fraction of the carbon  dioxide necessary to push the planet into catastrophic climate change.dioxide sufficient to push the planet into catastrophic climate change


In this light, we want to encourage TD depositor to divest from TransCanada, or to close their account until the bank does so.

 

Additionally, we are in the early stages of planning a campaign to convince the State of Vermont to withdraw the money it currently has with the Bank. In fiscal year 2013, TD Bank held 66% of the state’s cash, based on average end-of-day balances. During that period, the state paid the bank over $787,000 in fees. We believe that the State should move its money to a local bank that doesn’t do business with fossil fuel companies.

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Column The Great Adventure

The Feminine in the Twenty-first Century

Like A Girl

Terri Kneipp

Jul 1, 2014


Yes! Like A Girl


Wow. I feel remiss. Evidently I was supposed to feel responsible for the inappropriate ways men have ogled me since I was 12 or to think only girls should have to dress conservatively for school. This week has been full of stereotypical negative phrases, images and responsibilities about or toward girls and women being bandied about, discussed in multiple arenas, debated ad nauseam in other words, my mind is spinning. Between school dress codes to a broader discussion on modest dress to limiting phrases, let’s dive into the deep end.


Early in the week on a ladies forum, the talk turned to modest dress: what was appropriate, how to help men behave themselves, should cleavage be shown or not, etc. This in itself is a powder keg ready to start a maelstrom. My first thought was that it’s not my job to “help men” control their impulses; but, also that it was demeaning to men, assuming they couldn’t control themselves. Give the guys some credit: they all aren’t lecherous, leering dolts who are unable to be respectful using common decorum in every day life. Luckily, I found a video for Christian men from a Christian man (http://johnpavlovitz.com/2014/06/20/young-men-sex-and-urge-ownership-and-why-its-not-the-girls-problem/), so if you are not a Christian, you may not see an issue, that isn’t the point. My point is taking the responsibility for any action off of anyone other than the person who is committing the action. If a crime is committed, it should never be the victim’s fault.  If I choose to wear a tank top that shows a little cleavage, heaven forbid, because it is summer, I have an ample chest and it’s freaking hot and some man stares, that’s on him. I am not dressing a certain way to elicit a given response, but I am also not going to over react unless the behavior is obnoxious and intrusive. Being bundled from head to toe in puffy ski gear, I have had men make comments that weren’t appreciated and I dealt with them as any mature woman would, swiftly, clearly and leaving no doubt of my meaning. With that said, dressing fairly modestly is what works for me.


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This column is sponsored by Delectable Mountain Cloth

A Brief History of Natural Inclusion


Alan Rayner

Jan 13, 2015


Natural inclusion is an ongoing evolutionary process of ‘being’ and ‘becoming.’ Our current understanding of the meaning and implications of this process, and the language we use to describe it, also continues to evolve. It did not come into being instantaneously or without trial and error. Your participation is welcome in helping it to develop further in clarity, depth and richness, because no one of us can claim to be an expert authority whose word is final. Natural inclusion can only adequately be appreciated from within diverse real-life experience, not from an isolated viewpoint as a detached observer.

It is important to be aware of the history of our attempts to communicate natural inclusion, otherwise you may get confused when you come across previous incarnations and possible misconceptions of what in essence is a very simple theme.  Natural inclusion is the co-creative inclusion of space and energy within each other to give rise to natural flow-forms, over scales ranging from sub-atomic to galactic. These flow-forms have distinct identities, but are not completely isolated from one another as fully discrete, independent entities. They continually arise and reconfigure as myriad variations upon the same underlying theme.

For Alan Rayner, what had probably been a lifelong unconscious awareness of natural inclusion first started to become explicit in the 1990’s, culminating in the publication of his book, ‘Degrees of Freedom – Living in Dynamic Boundaries’ (Imperial College Press, 1997). The book was prompted especially by his observations of how fungi and other ‘indeterminate life forms’ grow and interrelate with one another and their habitats. Alan recognised that natural boundaries are never rigidly discrete limits that completely isolate insides from outsides, as is assumed by definitive logic. Instead, natural boundaries are dynamic interfacings between inner and outer realms, which vary in their deformability, permeability and connectivity, depending on local circumstances.

Although this landmark book retained the definitive language of abstract perception, notably with respect to such concepts as ‘natural selection’, ‘competition’ and ‘co-operation’, the basic premise underlying this language was questioned, and the need for a more fluid depiction of evolutionary process was recognised. Moreover, the final chapter, ‘Compassion in Place of Strife – the future of human relationships?’, clearly signalled how a shift from definitive to dynamic perceptions of natural boundaries could enable a move from needless hostility,  to loving and respectful  ways of life that are consistent with actual human experience and make sound sense.


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Op Ed

Witness to Genocide: Israel/ Palestine: A JOURNEY TO PEACE

The Op Ed writer is

Namaya

Aug 24, 2014



We are all tremendously saddened by the ongoing wars in Israel and Palestine, but it is a war that few Americans and outsiders can full understand.  Namaya, the poet and performance artist, has created this program “Witness to Genocide:ISRAEL/ PALESTINE: A JOURNEY TO PEACE and would like to present this at your school, church, or community center.


A trailer sample can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CltHSUoHr0&feature=plcp


This is a multimedia performance on the narrative of the Jewish Diaspora, the Palestinian people, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine (West Bank and Gaza.)  The performance combines stories, music, poetry, photography, and art based on Namaya’s story of living and working in Yemen, Morocco, and his travels through Palestine, Israel, and the Islamic world.  Namaya also speaks of his Jewish family’s journey out of Eastern Europe through such stories as “L’Chaim” and of Jewish life during the Diaspora.


Caption: Witness – in commemoration of Krystallnacht and the occupation of Palestine, in the witness that there can be peace in Palestine and a future for the children of Israel & Palestine.


Namaya said, “I tell this story out of necessity. In witnessing the destruction of our Jewish communities through pogroms and the holocaust, having touched the walls of Prague and Budapest with the names of my extended family who perished, and also seeing the present inhumane occupation of Palestine… I am obligated to tell this story. In telling I hope to create an opportunity for a future for the children of Israel and Palestine.”

The  program is a one person performance with multimedia, art work, and music.  It can be performed in a theater, school, or gallery space. At the end of the performance, there is an opportunity for discussion of the performance in the spirit of compassionate listening.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Real Food ! 

White Stew

Phil Innes

Oct 19, 2014


This is a stew where all the ingredients are white or nearly so, and you can vary ingredients to suit yourself, even adding one colorful thing for contrast.


Get starting by sautéeing some onion and if you use it, celery — this makes both much sweeter. I also pre-cooked some chicken by frying it until 2/3rd cooked, then removing bone from thighs. You could as well boil the chicken and reserve the stock for the stew. Breast meat ‘looks better’ but has less taste and chunky texture. For a vegetarian stew add marinated tofu instead.


I also used an unusual vegetable, white eggplant [illus]. Cut into coins, and mix with plentiful oil in large bowl, sauté.


Otherwise in a large pot successively add some or all these ingredients:


Chicken

Garlic [rough chopped]

Eggplant

Onion

Celery

Parsnip

Turnip

Potato

Tofu

Mushrooms

Seasoning [I used a lemon-garlic mix]


Liquid should just cover ingredients.


You can finish the stew by adding cream to it at the end with the heat off, or perhaps serve plain Greek yoghurt at the table. Serve over rice or with chunky bread.

<extract>

Graphic Traffic

An orientation to illustration and illustrated books for writers

By Marlene O’Connor on Jan 16, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views

Street Dance – Flight, personal piece


Here are illustrations of Marlene’s work and she has also contributed notes on how to sensibly engage graphic artists, illustrators and publishers as a generous addition to orienting the writer to the subject.  

Read More

This column is sponsored by www.zephyrdesignsvt.com


Dec 28th, 2011

Photo Brooks House Fire


Things started quietly enough with normal amounts of snow but the people in the municipal building could hardly anticipate multiple disasters in 2011  

Read More


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Last Entry Mac Gander

Photo Rudyard Kipling at Naulakha near Brattleboro.


130 years ago in 1880/81 Rudyard Kipling completed the 26 question questionnaire. Kipling subsequently moved to Brattleboro and Dummerston, living here from 1892 to 1896.


At the time it is said that Kipling was known by more people in the world than was any other person. I would like to publish your own responses in Vermont Views Magazine to the very same questions Kipling answered.




Please add your answers below the 26 questions on the questionnaire page, or write in for a set of emailed questions.


Read More


StudioONE

Len Emery


The Project:

Goffstown Slaughterhouse


Here is a small representative sample of a fairly large project at a slaughterhouse in Goffstown.


The Photographer

Len Emery


"I come from an engineering background with all of its inflexibility and predefinition. Conversely, photography is often fleeting and very much undefined. I try to capture the image as it happens, the instant framed from my perspective for all to see my interpretation. I try to use the environment as an element of the image, allowing it to enhance and sometimes be the image. I then try to draw the viewer into the image as I was drawn in when I first saw it.


I am a pilot as well as a photographer and use my flying skills and camera together when doing contract aerial photography. All of my photos are typically of Vermont and in particular the villages and valleys of the Black River basin area.


See More ➤


Studio TWO

Featuring

January and February at Gallery 2 Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works.

Featured in the current photo exhibit are landscapes (oil) by Anne Cady [captioned]; wooden hats and bowls by Johannes Michelsen; figures (oil) by Dane Tilghman.

See More ➤


Studio 3

A seven color print, ‘Migration’, by William Hays


William Hays, printmaker

To view the images sequentially, click the link to Studio 3 and press ‘Play Slideshow.’

To illustrate a companion article on print making by Brattleboro artist William Hays, the subject kindly forwarded me these 7 images of a print in the making. The full article will appear as a Monthly Feature.  See More ➤


Studio 4

Group Photo Shoot

October 20, 2014

“Not far from Main Street”


Len Emery

Phil Innes

Merritt Brown

Greg Worden


See More ➤


If You Lived Here

Stroll presents Beer, Cider and Cheese Festival at River Garden

Jan 25, 2015 


Strolling of the Heifers will present a mid-winter Beer, Cider and Cheese Festival on Friday, Feb. 13, from 5 p.m to 8 p.m at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, Main Street, Brattleboro. 


The event is a fund-raiser for Strolling of the Heifers, and takes place in conjunction with the Harris Hill Ski Jump. It features eight craft brewers and 20 cheese makers and specialty food producers from throughout Vermont and New Hampshire.


"As a way to gear up for the Ski Jump, at this festival people will have the opportunity to sample some of Vermont’s finest beers and ciders as well as cheeses and other specialty foods," said Molly Alderman-Person, the event's coordinator, "and this is also a great way to gather some delicious gifts for your Valentine!"


Musical entertainment will be provided by the Franz Roberts Trio.

 

Admission is $20, for adults, 21 or older, only. Each admission provides tickets exchangeable for eight, two-ounce tasting samples from participating brewers, as well as free samples from cheesemakers and specialty food vendors. All tickets will be sold at the door, cash only.


Additional tickets for beer samples may be purchased. Vendors will be selling brews or food to take home, as well.

 

The brewers attending the event are:

     Citizen Cider, Burlington

     Hermit Thrush Brewery, Brattleboro

     Whetstone Station, Brattleboro

     14th Star Brewing Company LLC., Saint Albans

     Zero Gravity Craft Brewer, Burlington

     Flag Hill Farm, Vershire

     Woodchuck Hard Cider, Middlebury

     McNeill’s Brewery, Brattleboro

 

Cheese and other specialty food vendors include:


Read More ➤


If You Lived Elsewhere

TOP 10 CURIOUS REPORTS FROM CORNWALL 2014

plus


Fried Egg Baffles Police




The news across Cornwall as reported by the West Briton newspaper was dominated by the story of a mystery fried egg found at a crime scene in the Isles of Scilly. The following 10 stories were reported in the press.


It has prompted us to take a look at some of the more 'quirky' news to have hit the headlines in the last couple of years, says the editor. I wonder if our own Vermont newspapers can compile such a quirky list? Cornwall has about the same population as Vermont.


1. Do you remember when dust from the Sahara desert meant we all had to wash our cars (or wait for the next shower in most cases)?

Is the fine layer of sand covering Cornish cars really from the Sahara Desert?


2. We definitely under-played this one:

Ghost ship full of diseased cannibal rats could crash into coast of Devon or Cornwall. The abandoned Lyubov Orlova has been missing since it cut adrift while being towed from Canada nearly a year ago. Those searching for the ship say there are likely to be thousands of disease-ridden rats on board with no source of food except each other, according to The Sun. Belgian-based searcher Pim de Rhoodes said: "She is floating around there somewhere. There will be a lot of rats and they eat each other."





4. Serious crime issues are nothing new for Cornwall sadly:

Falmouth police issue description of stolen Christmas tree as '6ft tall, with lots of green branches and prickly bits'


6. Woah! That's not what you want to find behind your garden shed ...

Half metre long rat caught in a shed in Penryn






7. Do you remember when everyone (well, us anyway) got excited by the Great White Shark swimming towards Cornwall?

Lydia the Great white shark is on her way to Cornwall. Lydia is reported to be behaving erratically and may be pregnant.



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Aural, Oral, Verbal, Spoken



What is it to be? When an NPR reporter can say of a Supreme Court ruling: “...now we shall see what the oral reports will be...” we are certainly mixing our matadors!


Aural relates to hearing; Oral, ‘of the mouth’; Verbal and Spoken reference speech, and a choice whether you like Latin or English terms.


But you cannot ‘see’ any of these.


Overhear More ➤



Curious Topics


The Pirate Queen of Ireland



1. Granuaile / Gráinne Uí Mháille / Grace O’Malley

There is not a single mention of this bold and wily chieftain in official Irish historical records, probably because she was 1) a woman and 2) very pragmatic, and tended to side with whoever would keep her clan in power. Not exactly inspiring for later Irish rebels. But stories of her feats in the 16th century were preserved in the folk tradition and in official English records: Grainne was the annoying lady with the cunning ability to steal all their gold.


She was the only child of the chief of the O’Malleys, who ran the area of the Irish west coast now known as County Mayo. She captained a fleet of fishing boats that frequently turned into pirate ships, mostly when English ships swung too close to the Irish coast. She hit her peak after she outlived her first husband and married the chief of the Bourke clan at 36; he became her second–in-command, of course.


The coolest thing ever: when Grainne was in her 60s, she negotiated with Queen Elizabeth I—in Latin. The two powerhouses agreed to partner up against some of the more bothersome Irish clans. This was bad for the cause of Irish freedom, but quite good for Grainne herself. Although plenty of balladeers in the following centuries slapped her name onto nationalist poems and songs, the leader of the O’Malleys was a pirate and a tribal leader first, and a very tough broad. Anne Chambers’s biography Granuaile: The Irish Pirate Queen is the only real, thorough history of her life, if you can still find it.



Read More  ➤

send any answers or comments to onechess@comcast.net

100 Years Ago

Feature:  August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014





Caption: German soldiers embarking for the front


August 1

The German Empire declares war on the Russian Empire, following Russia's military mobilization in support of Serbia; Germany also begins mobilization. France orders general mobilization. New York Stock Exchange closed due to war in Europe, where nearly all stock exchanges are already closed.


August 2

German troops occupy Luxembourg in accordance with its Schlieffen Plan. A secret treaty between the Ottoman Empire and Germany secures Ottoman neutrality. At 7:00 pm (local time) Germany issues a 12-hour ultimatum to neutral Belgium to allow German passage into France.


August 3

Germany declares war on Russia's ally, France.

At 7:00 am (local time) Belgium declines to accept Germany's ultimatum of August 2.



Read More ➤


Local History

May 5, 2013


A lyrical homage by Charles Monette



With 1878’s best intentions, some sturdy men began

Building Brattleboro’s narrow gauge in the southeast kingdom

Upside verdant country, the West River, to South Londonderry

Financed by bankers’ bonds bought in towns’ river valleys

Read More



Sep 7, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views


A photo essay of 40 images and caption


“Before The Fall”



Read More



Reviews Old & New


The Illusion of Separation


Giles Hutchins new book is now released.


‘Cutting through habitual denials and academic evasions, Giles Hutchins exposes the delusion at the root of our planetary crisis.  And with a holographic richness of resources and disciplines, he discloses—indeed activates—the attitude that might just provoke our needed evolution. This is a wise and urgent text: may it be heard, and soon!’ Catherine Keller, Professor of Constructive Theology, Drew University, author of On the Mystery

 

‘An amazing tour de force, the intellectual tour of our lives…Never before, that I know of, has the choice of life, true life, or the path of degradation been put before us with such clear equanimity.’ Robert Sardello, PhD, author of Love and the Soul: Creating a Future for Earth.

 

‘Wonderful…well written, well researched and full of insight, this book will open your heart and mind…’ Stephan Harding, Head of Holistic Science, Schumacher College, author of Animate Earth

 

‘With clarity and insight Giles Hutchins analyses the roots of our present collective mindset of separation, and yet shows how science and spirituality point to a deeper, inclusive consciousness. Here are signposts for a future that is vitally needed in the present moment, if we dare to cross the threshold...’    Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, PhD, Sufi teacher and author, Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth.

 

‘A treasure of a book that I will share widely… a brilliantly written insightful tour de force’   Chris Laszlo, PhD, author of Flourishing Enterprise: The New Spirit of Business

<extracts>  Read More ➤


Brattleboro Skyline

A massive photo essay with captions

Jun 11, 2014


The Slow Living Summit and The Strolling of the Heifers 2014


Read More ➤


Localvore Directory

Click this link for locally grown and manufactured food products and how to find them directly


To add your business to the free listing of Localvores — contact the publisher at onechess@comcast.net


Phone numbers, websites, e-mails, travel directions and hours of business of a few dozen local farms and businesses making Vermont food products. Support your local food economy!


Just Added — Full Plate Farm

 

Full Plate Farm is a one acre vegetable farm conveniently located one and a half miles from downtown Brattleboro, VT.  We grow over 100 varieties of delectable, nutritious veggies using organic practices. We offer a CSA which includes all of our veggies, as well as berries and sweet corn from a few other local farms. We offer 12 different share options, so that you can choose how much produce you get and when. We also offer options between some of the veggies in your share as well as a “swap box” so that you will always have a choice to trade out a veggie you don’t like for one you do. Every week we include recipes and cooking suggestions. 


Read More ➤


This column is sponsored by the Brattleboro Food Coop http://brattleborofoodcoop.coop


Write On!

Cantaloupe


Charles Monette

Jan 5, 2015



Barbara and I had been eloping for 3 days when we pulled into a gas station in Oklahoma City.  We had a quarter tank of gas, no money and needed to get to Aurora, Colorado to continue with our plan.


We had met on a summery afternoon in the Bayville Inn in Bayville, Long Island.  Barbara was tending bar and playing guitar.  I was her sole customer and fell instantly in love.  Two weeks later, we left all behind heading for a visit with her brother in San Diego… and to get married.


My 1963 cherry red VW bug was a sweet car and its tires were new.  I had a lame brained idea to sell my spare tire to make enough money to fill the tank and get us to Colorado where the last of my paychecks were being forwarded.


On that lazy Saturday morning, the gas station attendant answered my query with a slow drawl, “I hate to take a man’s spare tire.”  He slowly added, “there might be some work up the road… they’re pouring a foundation… could try there.”  He gave us $5 bucks for the tire, and we headed up the road.


It was about 8 a.m.  The sun was up warm when we came to this large field with workers milling about getting ready for a pour.  I spotted a gentleman who seemed to be the foreman and explained our situation.  I said that I’d work hard for as long as he needed to make some money to fuel our elopement (not phrasing it that way) to my aunt’s home in Aurora.


Richard said, “okay”.  Barbara went back into town to see if she could find some work.  She said she’d come back at lunchtime.


I was 23 years young and a hard worker from New York.  Soon cement trucks were chuteing their aggregate muck over the rebar and our hustling boots.  I was feverishly raking and shoveling to stay ahead and to smooth and to level the playing field of a huge slab concrete floor that would soon ground a warehouse.


Around ten o’clock, we broke for coffee and the foreman tall, somber and preacher-like called me over.  Richard liked me, my hustle, and he counted off 15 one-dollar bills.  He told me that he had read in the New York Times that Oklahoma City was one of the up and coming cities in America… adding that a young man could make a good start here.  Richard was born again, and he went into a Christian talk of persuasion and opportunity.  He mentioned that his wife had one of those, “new-fangled, whaddya call them, crackpots”?  I quickly corrected, “crock pot.”  “Yeah that’s it, why don’t you and your gal come have dinner with us this evening?”


<extract> Read More ➤


Are you wearing Dhaka?

When it comes to fashion, applying even the most modest ethical criteria is ridiculously hard. All the big chains – including Primark, which had a supplier in the destroyed Rana Plaza building on Dhaka's outskirts, and has promised "to provide support where possible" to the families of the 187 workers known to have died – have ethics policies that can be viewed online. None has a clearly labelled and readily availably Fairtrade or equivalent line on the shop floor.


Read More ➤



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A collection of contributed work, articles and columns from around the community, including transcripts from 80+ recorded interviews from the ‘In Conversation With’ series.


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  Passages Daily  D. H. Lawrence



Love is the flower of life, and blossoms unexpectedly and without law, and must be plucked where it is found, and enjoyed for the brief hour of its duration.


California is a queer place in a way, it has turned its back on the world, and looks into the void Pacific. It is absolutely selfish, very empty, but not false, and at least, not full of false effort.


Reason is a supple nymph, and slippery as a fish by nature. She had as leave give her kiss to an absurdity any day, as to syllogistic truth. The absurdity may turn out truer.


Myth is an attempt to narrate a whole human experience, of which the purpose is too deep, going too deep in the blood and soul, for mental explanation or description.


You don't want to love - your eternal and abnormal craving is to be loved. You aren't positive, you're negative. You absorb, absorb, as if you must fill yourself up with love, because you've got a shortage somewhere.


I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.


The great living experience for every man is his adventure into the woman. The man embraces in the woman all that is not himself, and from that one resultant, from that embrace, comes every new action.


The only justice is to follow the sincere intuition of the soul, angry or gentle. Anger is just, and pity is just, but judgement is never just.


In every living thing there is the desire for love.


The Christian fear of the pagan outlook has damaged the whole consciousness of man.

 

To This Degree


An image a day every day of the year



Today: A masked figure performs ritualistic acts in a mystery play


The individual’s involvement in long-established patterns of activity aiming at the release of collective power.


TRANSPERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY.


A note on the image: Medieval Mystery Play by Joseph Ratcliffe Skelton, twentieth century.


Jan 25 2015 Aquarius 6

(1° to 15° Aquarius is CONTRIBUTION in Act 4, CAPITALIZATION)

 

Studio TWO

Featuring

January and February at Gallery 2 Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works.

Featured in the current photo exhibit are landscapes (oil) by Anne Cady [captioned]; wooden hats and bowls by Johannes Michelsen; figures (oil) by Dane Tilghman.

See More ➤

 

Selected Letters

Addressing racial bias in Vermont law enforcement


Curtiss Reed, Jr.

Jan 22, 2015

 

Brattleboro. In spite of Vermont’s recent designation as the safest state in the nation by Yahoo Homes, events in Ferguson, Staten Island, Cleveland and elsewhere across the nation has many Vermonters wondering about racial bias in Vermont law enforcement. Where there is scant information the tendency is to fill the void with whatever the prevailing negative narrative might be. This commentary offers to fill that void with a brief retrospective on how Vermont State Police (VSP) leadership has been shaping a more responsive, culturally competent agency. More so than any other state agency, Vermont State Police has demonstrated conspicuously courageous leadership in the areas of bias reduction and cultural competency.

 

A decade ago Col. James Baker, then director of the Vermont State Police, came to my office unannounced to discuss our published study on Brattleboro’s minority community perceptions of law enforcement. Unlike other law enforcement leadership who sought to dispute our research findings of perceived racial profiling and bias, or to challenge our research methodology, or to question the motives or credibility of our community organization, Col. Baker had another agenda.

 

Col. Baker came to find out what we thought he could do to increase trust between minority communities and law enforcement in general and VSP, in particular. Rather than discount the experiences of people of color he took our conversations to reflect on the agency’s history and his own upbringing, biases, and prejudices.

 

As a result he brought enhanced professional development on the demographic and cultural shifts underway in Vermont, the economic imperative for addressing bias, and the role bias plays in the highly decentralized, discretionary decision making environment of Troopers in the field.

 

In June 2008 Col. Baker testified before the Vermont State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights (VSAC/USCCR) that he had undertaken the following actions to address racial bias including 1) the issuance of a vision and expectations that all people be treated with respect and dignity, and without the influence of bias; 2) adoption of a Non-bias Policing policy; 3) installation of video cameras in State Police cars and requiring their use for all traffic stops; 4) appointment of a standing committee to audit traffic stops that result in searches; 5) operation of an Internal Affairs process, by statute and policy, that is overseen by an Advisory Commission whose members are appointed by the governor; and 6) the commencement of an enhanced training program.

Read More ➤

 

Weekly Feature

Iona Iona! Mother of Dreams



Iona is the “motherland of dreams”, the ethereal ground of imagination and ground zero of Druid culture. Its spell draws us into its center. Iona’s old Gaelic name Innis nan Druidhneach translates as the Island of the Druids. Their motto was Y Gwir Erbyn Y Byd (“Truth Against the World”). These Servants of Truth held greater power than the kings who took advice from them: All of nature was sacred to them and they were its students and stewards.

The first woman’s church was founded here, on I, hence ‘Ey-brides’ after the pre-christian presence of Bride, 360 stones around the site before any Christian presence as represented by the ‘Johannine’ St. Columba.


Among other names for the island one is Ì nam ban bòidheach ("the isle of beautiful women").


I means island. And all the western seas around northwest Scotland seem to those they have been there as islands out of time. The Druid Islands as they were known until just recently, but nothing dark here about Druid culture. Instead this reference to the 260 stones which is also noticed in other religions such as the Muslim one, the Kaaba being surrounded with 260 stones. On I, or Iona, the stones were each one carved.


Johannine versions of Christianity are in accord with nature, rather than in accord with Rome, so to speak. Even the equal armed Celtic cross preceded the Christian cross by 1,000 years, and was not an image of torture, but of forces intersecting.

The Book of Kells - Gospel of John


In the early Historic Period Iona lay within the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata. The island was the site of a highly important monastery (see Iona Abbey) during the Early Middle Ages. According to tradition the monastery was founded in 563 by the monk Columba, also known as Colm Cille, who had been exiled from his native Ireland as a result of his involvement in the Battle of Cul Dreimhne. Columba and twelve companions went into exile on Iona, then part of the Irish kingdom of Dál Riata, and founded a monastery there. The monastery was hugely successful, and played a crucial role in the conversion to Christianity of the Picts of present-day Scotland in the late 6th century and of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria in 635. A large number of satellite institutions were founded, and Iona became the centre of one of the most important monastic systems in Great Britain and Ireland.


Iona quickly became a renowned center of learning, and its scriptorium produced highly important documents, likely including the original texts of the Iona Chronicle, thought to be the source for the early Irish annals. The monastery is often associated with the distinctive practices and traditions known as Celtic Christianity. In particular, Iona was a major supporter of the "Celtic" system for calculating the date of Easter during the time of the Easter controversy, which pitted supporters of the Celtic system against those favoring the "Roman" system used elsewhere in Western Christianity. The controversy weakened Iona's ties to Northumbria, which adopted the Roman system at the Synod of Whitby in 664, and to Pictland, which followed suit in the early 8th century. Iona itself did not adopt the Roman system until 715, according to the Anglo-Saxon historian Bede. Iona's prominence was further diminished over the next centuries as a result of Viking raids and the rise of other powerful monasteries in the system, such as the Abbey of Kells.


<extracts> Read More ➤

 

Weather

Jan 25





from NOAA

The National Weather Service


Brattleboro:


A slight chance of snow showers before 9am. Mostly sunny, with a temperature falling to around 21 by 5pm. Northwest wind 7 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.


Tonight
Partly cloudy, with a low around 2. Northwest wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm in the evening.


National:


Snow for Ohio Valley and northern mid-Atlantic Sunday into Monday


A clipper system will strengthen as it moves from the Midwest to the Ohio Valley on Sunday. Snow, some heavy, will spread from the Ohio Valley into parts of the lower Great Lakes and northern mid-Atlantic Sunday into Monday morning. The heaviest snow is expected from central Ohio into southwest Pennsylvania. Winter Weather Advisories are in effect for many of these locations.


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Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack from her title

Art & Soul

Cézanne Opening At MOMA


The Museum of Modern Art in New York held a special preview for artists only, to view Cézanne’s late watercolors and oils. It was a wonderful idea, much appreciated by the artists, or at least by me.

Artists look at paintings differently. They like to get up close, to touch and feel. (Even though they are not supposed to, they consider it their right.)

They discuss the quality of light and the handling of space and color:

“Does he use vermillion or cadmium orange?”

“Look at those brushstrokes.”

“See how he had the guts to leave the area seemingly unfinished.”

There were clusters of artists hovering around individual paintings, and there was lots of art talk. The evening was animated, yet there was respect for individual artists who wanted to be alone with a painting.

Artists were present who hadn’t spoken to each other in years. Various factions waited for other factions to move away from a painting so they wouldn’t collide.

Nonetheless, we were all one family, relatives, connected with Cézanne, the godfather. He held us together, kept the factions at bay. Like relatives, we fight. Cézanne reunited us, if only for an evening.

 
Column 4our

Writers:   Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Fallout

Nanci Bern

Jan 23, 2015


Fallout: the debris from an explosion, the remnant of an action long past and finally, the silent remains of the unresolved. These are the ones that bear the most complexity. These are the ones that seed themselves in our souls even though we walk with resolute steps.

 

To give a relationship energy that cannot be changed, although our hearts are willing to explore the possibility, means that it must be met with the gaze of the other. If this doesn’t occur then just because we choose not to inhabit that emotional place because we do understand, in our minds, that there is nothing left to be done, does not always mean that the brash colors of loss will be blanched by time.


Years ago, before I had settled into the work I now inhabit, I did something else. This is no surprise. Most of us have been many things before finding our ‘one’ or, a number of ‘one’ soul home thing. But that had not happened at the time. However, surprisingly enough, I was quite good at what I was doing and became a mentor for more than a few people. I was known for my openness, professional generosity and ethics in a field that has many grey areas where the ethical is concerned. The Ethics of Ambiguity is right at home here. While we all worked hard and seriously, we also enjoyed ourselves with each other in the same way.


But things can sometimes go terribly wrong, or at least seriously blandished with misinterpretation that forges its way into intractability toward understanding. When mixed with a yet immature attitude toward life, let alone the ‘adult’ world of business, no blacksmith could rework what this fire had wrought. There was no fixing this. I had become the villain despite other’s opinions as well. And so a relationship that was a steady stream of connection, warmth and growth was stunted by a closed and recalcitrant young woman who clearly felt betrayed.


Although forgiveness was not what I deemed I needed, I offered her the chance. I framed my apology in terms of a wider picture but she demanded the particular. The best I could do was to apologize for the fact that what transpired, although done ethically, did not yield the outcome she felt she deserved and I was sorry for her disappointment. It was not enough and I was dismissed from her life. She moved from the area soon after. I moved on and while I acknowledged my sadness I did not especially mourn because frankly, I was emotionally exhausted and felt I had done everything I could to be done. But affection and human regard, nonetheless remained.


This past August, after many years, I began to think about her. I needed to find her. I tried all the social channels yet found nothing. I thought that odd. So there was nothing to do then hope she was well and happy. But that for some reason did not feel right.


<extract> Read More ➤

 

Daily Articles

To This Degree

An image a day for every day of the year.


Passages


Weather

Local & National


Pretty Often

Art & Soul

Notes on Creating


Make a note of It



New

Feature

Articles


Column

Untitled Work

Letter from

Costa Rica

Mac Gander

Jan 25, 2015




Weekly Feature

Iona Iona! Mother of Dreams





Column 4our

Fallout


Nanci Bern

Jan 23, 2015




Feature

Selected Letters

Addressing racial bias in Vermont law enforcement

Curtiss Reed, Jr.

Jan 22, 2015




Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Live


Michael Cioffi



Curious Topics

The Pirate

Queen of Ireland





Studio TWO

Featuring




Column

Chess

Never Back Down in the King’s Gambit

Phil Innes

Jan 18, 2015




Column

4our

Creative Learning

Matti Salminen

Jan 17, 2015




Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Together


Michael Cioffi



Column

A Brief History of Natural Inclusion

Alan Rayner

Jan 13, 2015




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

A Modern Modest Proposal  number10

Jeri Rose

Jan 11, 2015



Special Feature

“Virtually There”


The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 3 — West Penwith to The Mount



Write On!

Cantaloupe


Charles Monette

Jan 5, 2015



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak


Never Got to Say

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary


A Schorr Thing



Column

4our

Breaking Trail

Matti Salminen

Jan 2, 2015



Column

Open Mind


In What Direction Would Dr. King

Be Leading His Followers Today?

Offie Wortham

Dec 30, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Carol of the Birds

Anne Stevenson



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Heroshema

Charles Monette



Special Feature

“Virtually There”

The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 2 — West Penwith



Column

Natural Inclusivity

Estrangement and Reconciliation

The liberating and healing influence of natural inclusionality

Alan Rayner

Dec 19, 2014



Write On!

The Month of Kislev

Nanci Bern

Dec 18, 2014



Feature

Guest Article

Fog on the River

a poem inspired by an image

Terry Kneipp



Column

in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 16, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Is This What Christmas is All About?

Terri Kneipp



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Secondhand Nightmare

Mac Gander



Column

4our

Our Eyes

Matti Salminen

Dec 13, 2014



NEW Column

Consolations of History

DUSTY DEATH (Part 1)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014



Feature

Selected Letters

Enough Whining

Paul Truong

Dec 4, 2014


Column

Articulate

The order of chaos

Kate Anderson

Dec 1, 2014



Column

4our

A Ride Through the Mist

Nanci Bern

Nov 30, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

An Exhale of Air

(A Ferguson Poem)

Nanci Bern



Feature

Write On!

Swirlin’ shadows of the moon

Charles Monette

Nov 18, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Beyond the Horizon

Tasneem Tawfeek

Nov 17, 2014


Column

Post Oil Solutions

Protest Rally at Brattleboro TD Bank

Tim Stevenson

Nov 16, 2014




Article

Overheard

Aural, Oral,

Verbal, Spoken


Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Late Autumn

Andrea Wallens Powell



Feature

Write On!

Words For Translation Into Any Language

Mac Gander

Nov 11, 2014



Column

4our

Rear View Mirror

Laura Momaney

Nov 10, 2014


Column

in between

“When you are in Tune with the Unknown, the Known is peaceful.”

Julia Ferrari

Nov 9, 2014




Vermont Diary

Why Shumlin Only Squeaked Through

Nov 6, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Two poems I AM and Romantics

Michael Cioffi



Guest Article

Gov. Shumlin’s remarks, City Hall Burlington, Nov. 5

[full text]



Column

Open Mind

Kwanza, Is It A Class or a Race Thing?

Offie Wortham

Nov 6, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak

THE GEOGRAPHY OF DESIRE

Terry Hauptman



Column

O Citoyen!

About Fairpoint — A Letter

Robert Oeser

Oct 30, 2014



Column

Open Mind

Being Present is The Only Good Option for True Mental Health

Offie Wortham

Oct 28, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

run’way

Phil Innes



Column

Untitled Work

True Story with Metaphor

Mac Gander

Oct 26, 2014



Column

4our

Upon Getting Ready for Samhain (Halloween)–Why Are There No Mirrors in Tarot Cards?

Nanci Bern

Oct 25, 2014



Studio 4

Group Photo Shoot

October 20, 2014

“Not far from

Main Street”



Real Food !

White Stew

Phil Innes

Oct 19, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak

Two Poems: Rough & A Waltz For Two

Michael Cioffi



Column

4our

Mind Eternal

Matti Salminen

Oct 17, 2014




Real Food !

Meatballs

Mac Gander

Oct 16, 2014



Vermont Diary

An unusual Diet

Oct 15, 2014




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Value of a Short Lived Amnesia

Jeri Rose

Oct 13, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Library where everything is forgotten

Charles Monette



Real Food !

Braised pork-chops in tomatoes

Mac Gander

Oct 12, 2014



Column

Untitled Work

Summer’s End

Mac Gander

Oct 10, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

REQUIEM

For Anna Akhmatova

(1889-1966)

Terry Hauptman



Real Food !

Roasting a whole chicken and living off it for a week

Mac Gander

Oct 6, 2014




Guest Article

Beyond capitalism

Donnie Maclurcan




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

When are we too young?

Jeri Rose

Oct 4, 2014



Column

Natural Inclusivity

BOMBSHELLS

The Devastating Mistakes of Abstract Perception

Alan Rayner

Oct 2, 2014



Real Food !

Red Sauce,

White Sauce

Mac Gander

Oct 1, 2014



Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Eugene Uman

Sep 30, 2014



Column

Open Mind

Recommendations for Controlling Lobbying

In the

Vermont Legislature

Offie Wortham

Sep 29, 2014



Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute

Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014



Column

Old Lady Blog

The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014



Column

Energetics 

US and World Energy News

George Harvey

who is stopping us?

Sept 24, 2014



Column

4our

The Lastlings

Nanci Bern

Sep 22, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Fall

Tasneem Tawfeek

Sep 20, 2014



Vermont Diary


Strange brew

Sep 18, 2014



Column

Untitled Work

The Language of the Tribe

Mac Gander

Sep 17, 2014



Non Profit of the Month


Turning Point

Sep 14, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak


Matrix…Nine…Words…Eleven

Nanci Bern

Sep 11, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

A note from the author

Aug 26, 2014


Column

Old Lady Blog

Amazing GRACE:

Global Citizens and Artists for Social Change

Toni Ortner

Sep 4, 2014


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Len Emery

Aug 27, 2014



Vermont Diary

News

Aug 25 2014


Reviews Old & New

Voices Like Wind Chimes

By Arlene F. Distler

Reviewed by: Mary W. Mathias

 Poet With a Painter’s Eye

Aug 9, 2014



100 Years Ago

Feature: August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014



Beer & Bangers

J.D McCliment’s and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Jun 30 2014


Monthly Feature

Photo Essay

William Hays,

print maker

February, 2014

 

A Modern Modest Proposal  number10

Jeri Rose

Jan 11, 2015


I am tired of the mass agreement that has laid down these put downs...I like mimes, anchovies, street musicians, people named Donald who want to be called Donald, and puns. Bud gives me a headache, but leaf makes me smile. I do not understand why any woman would wear high heels to pander to men liking their butts sticking out. I like long hair and beards on men. And on women too...wear it proudly if you got it ladies. I like bald men with long hair. Nipple rings and animals smashed on the road make me cringe. If I had power, I would never make a law about any of these things.


However, I notice that there are over 7 billion people on the planet and they all want to eat, drive cars, live in a home. They want stuff. The Chinese government noticed that they had a lot of people. They wanted to keep that number from increasing due to the misery attendant with the inability of the country to feed its children. The forced abortions and other problems that this policy placed on the Chinese people makes us cringe at the loss of personal freedom it represents. I hate the idea of government interfering in something so intimate and personal. AND YET…


I have a modest proposal…that I am rather more serious about than Swift was about eating babies. What if…all men at their entrance into puberty were to make a few deposits into a sperm bank and then get a vasectomy. The result would be no more unwanted unplanned pregnancies. As long as a man was careful about who he had sex with to prevent disease, he would not need to ever undergo the discomfort and loss of sensation of wearing a condom. Women would not have to take hormones to prevent their eggs from passing into the uterus.


Were the government to get behind this, a man would get to make two withdrawals in order to have a replacement value of himself and his partner. Thus the population would not increase and the human race would stabilize at the number we are presently struggling to maintain. Our science would catch up with this number as we became more efficient at how we recycle, and how we use the resources of the planet. Of course using solar, wind, hemp would all factor into this renewal of our ability to live in balance with the reality of a finite earth that is also fertile and abundant.


<extracts>  Read More ➤

 

Monkey’s Cloak

Live




Michael Cioffi


I’m sorry about everything, dear
Sorry that the lillies never blossomed this year Sorry that everything changed

I’m sorry about everything, dear
That George W. Bush got re-elected And Johnny got deployed
I’m sorry that you didn’t listen when I said no Maybe I never did say it out loud

I’m sorry that you’ll never get to hear his voice, even for a second That sweet voice: ‘I love you mom’

He was special, our boy, he was
I know you can’t look at me anymore, and for that, too, I am sorry

I hope you see him in your dreams
I hope you dream of a time when my apologies had not yet existed Live there
Live in that dream


Read More ➤

 


Make a note of it




Sunday Jan 25 - Looking ahead Monday thru Wednesday, while some weather stations are saying nothing much, others are forecasting a ‘historic blizzard.’ The guy I met at the supermarket stocking up on storm supplies told me he heard 12-18.



 

Column Untitled Work

Letter from Costa Rica


This essay was written during a brief stint teaching writing to Landmark students during a study abroad trip to Costa Rica earlier in January.

Mac Gander

Jan 25, 2015


I wake at dawn most mornings in Monteverde. It seems foolish not to, with so much strange and unfamiliar beauty surrounding one, and the promise of strong fresh coffee waiting on a table near the bed. Today is the last dawn I will wake here—we leave for the Caribbean coast in a couple of hours. As always, the sky is grey with low misty clouds, and the air is cool and mild, wind gusting and settling again in the trees, shaking the branches.


I’ve always been fascinated by the notion, which I find best expressed in one of Borges’ short pieces, that it is not infrequent in life that one does something for the last time, often not aware of it until later, if ever. Today I know that this is the last time I will wake at dawn in Monteverde—that even were I to return to this place, it would be a different place, a different trip, and I would be different, too.


Photo caption: Sunset in Monteverde


In this piece of Borges that I am remembering, he describes running into an acquaintance of his at sunset on an avenue in Buenos Aires, and talking for a while, then parting with the promise that they would see one another soon again. He watches her walk away in the late light, waving to her, not knowing, he says, that the broad avenue she crossed was actually the River Styx, since she would die soon after and he would never see her again.


Nothing so melancholy as that today, of course—we’re all anxious to get to the beach, and I am sure our 8-hour bus-ride will be filled with laughter and occasional complaints, filled with life. Still, it is interesting to come to the end of one’s time in an unfamiliar and compelling place.


Yesterday I walked with some students along a tree-top path through a reserve in Monteverde, eight bridges crossing rivers as we walked, putting us into the jungle canopy at times. In a way, we were walking through the jungle, surrounded by dense flora and fauna, but the path was broad and well-paved, and if one looked to either side, into the jungle itself, one could see that none of us had any idea of what it would actually be like, to try to make passage through the thick vines and undergrowth and uneven terrain.

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