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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Contributors To Vermont Views Magazine


Patrick Leahy


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Photograph by Vermont Views

This page is sponsored by Neil Taylor "The Blind Masseur"


Special Feature

“Virtually There”


The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 1 — Introduction



Not for Sissies — like climbing Everest 4 times

The South West Coast Path is England's longest waymarked long-distance footpath (and one of the longest in the UK) and a National Trail. It stretches for 630 miles (1,014 km), running from Minehead in Somerset, along the coasts of Devon and Cornwall, to Poole Harbour in Dorset. Since it rises and falls with every river mouth, it is also one of the more challenging trails. The total height climbed has been calculated to be 114,931 ft (35,031 m), almost four times the height of Mount Everest.


The final section of the path was designated as a National Trail in 1978. Many of the landscapes which the South West Coast Path crosses have special status, either as a National Park or one of the Heritage Coasts. The path passes through two World Heritage Sites: the Dorset and East Devon Coast, known as the Jurassic Coast, was designated in 2001, and the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape in 2007.



£300 million ($475million) per year

In the 1990s it was thought that the path brought £15 million into the area each year, but new research in 2003 indicated that it generated around £300 million a year in total, which could support more than 7,500 jobs. This research also recorded that 27.6% of visitors to the region came because of the Path, and they spent £136 million in a year. Local people took 23 million walks on the Path and spent a further £116 million, and other visitors contributed the remainder. A further study in 2005 estimated this figure to have risen to around £300 million.



The beginning of the Cornish section of the path

The path crosses into Cornwall at Marsland Mouth and continues south-westwards along this rocky coast, past Morwenstow then Higher and Lower Sharpnose Points. Beyond Sandy Mouth, the walking becomes easier through Bude, a popular surfing resort, and along Widemouth Bay. Returning to the cliffs, the path continues on to Crackington Haven, past Cambeak and further south (over "High Cliff", Southern Britain's highest sheer-drop cliff at 735 feet (224 m)), and from there to Boscastle, the scene of flooding in 2004.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Sheila Sackett



SK: Hello! This is Sheila.


Vt Views: Hello Sheila! The good part about this conversation is that Alex already gave a big overview of the Coop [recorded April 2010], past, present and regenerative future – just as the Fire Chief did for the FD, and the Rescue chief … that means we can talk about food! You don’t have to talk about the Coop at all! [some preamble taken out] I usually ramble away like this until my conversation partner thinks, ‘pathetic!’ and takes over. [laughter] But actually, I am also a cook and I’ve been cooking for 15 years, and for several of them actually cooking things that people want to eat! And I looked at all your food out there and I can say to you that I can cook as well as you can! I can cook any one of those dishes without a recipe – given about 3 hours, for 6 people; but you are producing this high quality food – incidentally famous in the town – so that you have twenty or thirty portions per dish, and a dozen dishes, every day… so, I guess you win. [laughter] Of course, it’s not just the amount of food, it’s the quality of it – this is famously the best place to eat lunch in town – don’t you think?


SK: I do think! I do. I’m blessed with an amazing staff – that’s the thing. And even before I started working here I walked into the Coop on the advice of a friend who knew that I had moved to the area, and who told me not to miss the Brattleboro Food Coop, it’s right up your alley, you’ll love it. So I came in to get something to eat and saw the deli – and right away I was just taken with it. It reminded me a lot of the early days of my career starting off in a natural food store that was really small and trying to find it’s way, trying to grow. It took me right back to that.


Vt Views: I remember the early days around here of small stores – everyone was making tuna sandwiches with sprouts in – that was a sort of standard alternative.


SK: Yes. And everyone making precious little platters of vegetarian dishes, and it was all very touchy feely and crunchy…


Vt Views:  …selling as many as 50 a day


SK: And then you were done for the day, then you’d go home, and come in the next day and think what you were going to cook today. All very romantic and lovely, but it does not anyway sustain a business if you want to go long-term.


SK: When I started working here that was the focus for me, to help this Coop get from the stage I found them at which was… you know, successful, loyal following, doing pretty well with what they do – but how to take that into something really significant in terms of sales volume production. How to get over that hurdle of just thinking for the day, and how to plan systems that can produce mass quantities… and not lose the quality, not lose the essence, that’s the secret.


Vt Views: I interrupted you before, and here’s another one – when did you come in and look at the food, and subsequently take the job?


SK: 2004.


Vt Views: Did you stride into the kitchen and just announce, ‘OK I just need to be here!’ [Laughter]


SK: It was an amazing case of timing – that’s what it was – I came in for lunch and happened to have a resume in the car – I wen to the front desk to ask if they had any openings, thinking even if I could work at the deli counter and have a part-time job until I find something real, it’s something to do where I could fit in really well… so I went to the front end and they said they had no openings.


SK: So I said ‘that’s OK, I’ll leave my resume and I’d like to fill out an application anyway, you never know what comes up.’ Diane was there at the front desk and gave me the stuff which I filled out, and I was going to just turn it in when I asked instead, ‘would it be possible to meet whoever is in charge of the deli?’


SK: So, this man came out and I introduced myself and said, ‘I don’t know if you are ever looking for help, but this is what I do. I love your store, this is terrific, and if we can help each other out, give me a call.’


SK: And it just turns out that he was looking for a kitchen manager. He was the food services director at that time and had got to the point where he realized that he wanted someone to run his kitchen. So… perfect timing!


SK: He hired me and then it was a real case of getting in here and recognizing that I had a lot of experience and a pretty strong background, but if I come in here like some bat out of hell, you know, you have to give these people credit because they had developed something very, very good.  So I didn’t want to come in and just change everything, and point out immediately what they have been doing wrong all these years… that’s not a good way to build loyalty! So I was very quiet and came in and watched, observed, looked, and let them train me, let them show me what they wanted me to do.


SK: Later on when it became time to start doing some tweaking or changing I had a lot of support, a lot of buy-in from these people, because they knew I wasn’t just power-hungry or egomaniacal.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Publisher’s Challenge

Challenge #6




Publisher’s Challenge


Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here


Selected responses will appear in this column.


Challenge #6

Oct 15, 2014


Hemingway as editor


Apart from some informal work for F. Scott, Ernest avoided editing, except of his own material where he was famous for extirpating adjectives. ‘Wipe them out,’ he thundered.


This challenge is to find and forward a piece of your own writing, between 100 and 400 words all adjectives eliminated.

Can be prose or poetry.



View Contributions to this

and other Challenges


Guest Article


Fog on the River


[a text inspired by an image]


Terri Kneipp




Fog on the river

The morning arriving with a chill

Slowly climbing out of bed

Tentatively putting feet to the hard, cold floor

Sun streaming in the window

Spider dangling from his web

An unsuspecting multi-colored leaf caught in the intricate weaving

Dangling, suspended in the air

The first signs of fall appearing


Fog on the mountain

Driving down the highway vibrant colors to behold

Slow going as the thickness swallows

Sounds of geese moving on for the season

Leaving for their seasonal home

Startling the silence of the early morning


<extract>

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Non Profit of the Month

Turning Point

People passing through downtown Brattleboro the last few months have been captivated by the bustle of construction activity and excavation at the corner of Elm and Flat streets. The Turning Point recovery center is restoring the 39 Elm Street property, severely damaged in Tropical Storm Irene, to use as our new permanent facility for serving our local recovery community. This restored and renovated building will give us a downtown home again, we hope before the year is out. This relocation brings us back closer to the community of people we serve. We love the idea that this building will experience a renaissance of its own while center guests enjoy their own personal recoveries from addictions. Our new home also brings us full circle, back to Elm Street where our story began more than seven years ago.


Our volunteer-led center has served this community since late 2006 as one of eleven linked yet independent recovery centers in Vermont, affiliated through the Vermont Recovery Network. Some guests go through treatment programs, and some have histories with the correctional system due to their addictions. Others find recovery through 12-step and other supportive, spiritual programs. Last year, guests made about 7,690 visits to our Center. About 6,550 were drop-in guests seeking peer support or a sober environment; about 1,140 attended 12-step and other mutual support groups. Attendance in programming has steadily increased as we have added services, although our visits dropped significantly after leaving our downtown location.


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Vermont Diary


Faster than a speeding bicycle



Let’s look at costs and time of the new, improved Amtrak service from Brattleboro to New York City, after the $75million investment, then similar services elsewhere:


London to Manchester, England is 199.9 miles, 2hrs 30. About $50bucks


Paris to Lyon in the south of France takes 2 hours 15 mins by bullet train and is 288 miles, $125bucks


London to Paris is 213 miles [as the crow flies] 2hrs 15mins and costs $68bucks


Brattleboro to New York City is 199.7 miles. And takes 5hrs 51minutes and costs $57 to $89bucks by Amtrak. This is after the recent $75million renovation.


London to Paris train which goes under the English Channel averages 94 miles per hour. The Paris to Lyon ‘bullet’ train averages 128 miles per hour. The non-bullet Virgin London to Manchester trains averages 80 miles per hour on tracks over 150 years old.  In 1927 the Model T Ford could go 45 miles per hour. Average speed of the Vermonter is 33 miles per hour.


Average speed of the Tour de France bicycle race is 25 miles per hour, but that includes mountain climbs in the Pyrenees and the Alps. On the flat the racers can maintain a consistent speed of about 30 miles per hour.


The highest speed officially recorded for any human-powered vehicle (HPV) on level ground and with calm winds and without external aids (such as motor pacing and wind-blocks) is 133.78 km/h (83.13 mph) set in 2013 by Sebastiaan Bowier in the VeloX3, a streamlined recumbent bicycle. In the 1989 Race Across America, a group of HPVs crossed the United States in just 5 days. The highest speed officially recorded for a bicycle ridden in a conventional upright position under fully faired conditions was 82.52 km/h (51.28 mph) over 200m. That record was set in 1986 by Jim Glover on a Moulton AM7 at the 3rd international HPV scientific symposium at Vancouver.


Read More ➤ 



Monthly Feature


William Hays, print maker


A visit with William Hays in his studio in Brattleboro. To accompany this article the current print he is working on now appears in a 7 stage slide show at Studio 3, click the link and press ‘play slideshow’.


I had previously interviewed the subject for an hour on January 21, 2011 almost exactly 3 years ago. Readers might like to read the transcript here. Then we progressed from art to the universe and all that.


This time we conspired to be more disciplined and attempt to illustrate a print in progress and something of the nature of the art.


Where better to start than with the inks themselves? An immediate question I had was if the materials the artist used were generally the same as had Gutenberg (c. 1395 – February 3, 1468)? And they were. Stand oil, I discovered, is a base for the ink made from linseed oil thickened by heating in an oxygen deprived chamber, and linseed comes from flax and is a good drying oil for a process known as polymerizing.

Extracts Read More ➤


Selected Letters

Enough Whining




Paul Truong

Dec 4, 2014


I am so tired of people blaming everything and everyone, instead of themselves, for their problems. Yes, the world is unfair. Yes, there are tons of problems. Yes, there are racists and jerks everywhere. Yes, sometimes we are faced with unfortunate circumstances. Yes, there are many but this but that....


We, as humans, have two options. Find solutions and do something to fix the problems, or do nothing and keep on blaming the world for our problems. I faced everything in my life, from unfortunate circumstances, inherent unfairness, to racism, etc. So what? I have been living in the United States for 35 years and there was no easy day. There was no easy day in Saigon, South Vietnam either. There is no red carpet in my life.


My father and I, along with several hundred other people were stranded on a deserted beach in Indonesia for 6+ months. Even though there was no food, no running water, no electricity, no toilet, no anything, we survived. We hunted, we fished, we ate anything we could find on the island or in the water. We could have said why us? It is unfair. But instead we were thankful that we did not end up in the bottom of the sea or in the bellies of the sharks like hundreds of thousands of other Vietnamese who were not as lucky.


We came to the US with $10 as political refugees. We did not qualify for government financial assistance. We again had to do everything possible to survive. For the first many months, we were living in the basement of a relative (starting on December 1, 1979) in New Jersey with no heat. Coming from a tropical country, it was not easy to get used to the cold weather. We were wearing donated clothes and shoes from a local church. I also got an old donated bike with no brakes. But it was more than good enough for me for school and work.


My first job at 14-15 was to clean up the toilets and mopped the floors at a local supermarket for $3.35 an hour (before tax) while going to high school full time with no English. I did my school work with an English - Vietnamese dictionary. But working a couple hours a day was not enough to survive and to send money back to Vietnam. So I found 6 other odd jobs to supplement my income to help out my family.


Read More ➤


Monkey’s Cloak

Secondhand Nightmare




Mac Gander


Haunted by stars, night like ice

Feels good on my face—in the parking lot


All the new cars have balloons drifting over them,

Primary colors floating in the neon air,


Another talisman—like a word for hope

In a language you don’t speak. So sure,


Show me where the bodies lie.

I will caress them, feel the ash in my hands.


I don’t mind it, I have been

Places farther than this one, sweet boy


With trinkets locked on your neck,

I know the sorrow you feel—I feel it, too—I do—


The empty church at nightfall, the white steeple

Stretching just far enough to the sky


To remind us of our losses. I get it.

Kiss me now. Good. Now kiss me again.


Read More ➤



DUSTY DEATH (Part 1)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014




And all our yesterdays have lighted fools

The way to dusty death. ~ Shakespeare


From an early age I have gravitated toward graveyards, where, despite my obsessive fear of death, I feel soothed by their remote air of melancholy and immense, incorruptible silence. I have felt drawn to graveyards for different reasons during different stages of my life.  As a teenager with a Gothic streak, I went to them to brood, particularly on moody, windswept, overcast days.


Over the years, graveyards became settings for picnics, moonlit walks and an instinctual search for stories as I puttered from stone to stone piecing together lost lives out of dates, inscriptions, relationships and life spans. In middle age I took to practicing tai chi among the dead at sunrise.


Recently, while doing volunteer work at the Brattleboro Historical Society, the woman responsible for cutting and pasting obituaries from the Brattleboro Reformer into notebooks piqued my interest with her comments on how drastically the language in obituaries had changed over the years. I started leafing through the notebooks and quickly found myself drawn in by the same eerie fascination that drives me to cemeteries.


But it was not the later obituaries that I read with such total attention, most of which are terse and dry accounts, as though the less said the better. I became engrossed in the obituaries written before 1940. One can’t help noticing that after mid-century the reports of people’s death begin to shed their intimate nature.


Language reveals the medical sense and sensibilities of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Often a person did not die; he or she “succumbed.” The given causes of death sound archaic: Acute dilation of the heart. Apoplectic shock. Convulsions and infections. Malignant typhoid fever complicated by pneumonia. A painful affection of the heart. Intestinal grip.

Often we hear only that death was caused by shock. One man died very suddenly of “heart attack caused by acute indigestion” (is that even possible?) Others died more slowly from ”infirmities due to advanced years” or “a general breaking down.” One woman, before succumbing in 1888, had suffered from “general prostration for quite some time.”


General prostration? A general breaking down? I’m not familiar with these terms as pathways to mortality. However, what I find most striking about these obituaries is not the terminology, but their immediacy and narrative sense. Page after page includes details that are personal, private and impressively poignant.


The tragic accidental death in 1937 of young William Holbrook, whose family occupied the former home of Rudyard Kipling, sounds more suited to a tabloid than a staid community paper.


Holbrook Boy, 7, Drowns in Pool. This headline is followed by a series of downward spiraling subheads: Body of William Found Underwater at Naulahka/Ninety-Minute Fight of Fireman in Vain/Last Missed by Father/Search Reveals Tragedy/Tiny Boats Found Floating Nearby/ Mother on Trip. Not Yet Located.


Really? Tiny boats found floating nearby?


<extract> Read More ➤



Column Untitled Work


Education, Training, and Oppression:

The Fate of Learning in the Digital Age

Mac Gander

Dec 8, 2014


NB: This is the first of two pieces on education and contemporary American society. It focuses on the structure of public education and the impact of this structure on children who have challenges complying with it. The second piece will examine the impact of the digital revolution on teaching and learning.


When I present to educators on the topic of learning differences, I emphasize how vital it is to engage multiple perspectives or frames of reference in order to gain a rich rather than one-dimensional understanding. I picked up this habit during the years I worked as a journalist in my twenties—that idea that you need to hear a story from all sides, and that the true story only begins to emerge after you have done this.


I tend to focus on ADHD, since it is our current epidemic—11 percent of school-age kids have been diagnosed with it at some point. I like to lay out several different approaches. History provides one guide: what we know call ADHD was first labeled a “failure of moral development.”


Social and educational policy is interesting: the social legislation related to ADD in the area of Medicare, Supplemental Security Income, and Special Education in public schools all changed around 1990 to expand coverage to ADHD. Between 1990 and 1993, the number of people diagnosed with ADHD in the US expanded from about 900,000 to 2.1 million. The disorder had been incentivized.


The clinical or psychiatric perspective holds that there is a chemical imbalance in the brain—a problem with transmission and re-uptake of dopamine, a neurotransmitter related to a broad range of functions and feelings, like satisfaction, motivation, and focus. This imbalance reduces the ability to stay focused and motivated, and to inhibit response to novelty and stimulus. Stimulant medications substitute for this missing chemistry, and function for people with ADHD the way eye-glasses function for people who are near-sighted.


Researchers in cognitive psychology who are interested in creativity provide another perspective. ADHD and creativity have been rarely studied, but the core deficit in ADHD—a failure to inhibit distraction—has been studied in relation to creative and divergent thinking. It turns out that the worse you are at inhibiting distraction, the better you are at tests of creative and divergent thinking. The research on this score is conclusive. <extract>

Read More ➤


Column 4our

Writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Our Eyes

Matti Salminen

Dec 13, 2014


Two books are significant to my learning path right now as I sit writing this essay.  Both began with the premise that they would further my understanding of self-education.  Both serve the purpose of my writing for this column.  However, they are otherwise quite dissimilar from one another.  One is a history book while the other is a workbook for “creative recovery.”  Three weeks ago now, I began reading The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron.  While I’ve had this book for well over two years, for whatever reason, I’ve felt hesitant to immerse myself in it.

 

Learning renewed its importance in my life when I began writing—that was in the spring of 2012.  Thinking along the lines that writing would help me cultivate greater creativity, I picked up a journal, and began jotting down my thoughts.  At the time I was living in a group home…another group home.  Writing, in a short time, would become top priority in my life, and to my recovery.

Writing has opened doors to a more synchronistic life; on many occasions, when I thought I was done with writing, someone would give me just the right encouragement and I’d keep on.  These words of encouragement came from readers, often, but from other writers too.  And then the opportunity to work with a publisher, Phil Innes, came about.  At the time that I began writing for Vermont Views I was hardly a polished writer.  But I kept working at it.  Soon, another writer—who also writes for Vermont Views—took me under his wing, and introduced me to the finer points of grammar and style.

 

Getting published in Vermont Views gave me further reason to dig deeper into my understanding of my own madness. 


<extract> Read More ➤


Column Articulate

The order of chaos

Kate Anderson

Dec 1, 2014

      

Artspace MN

The one thing that consistently separates creative placemaking from other practices is the participation of artists, both in planning and execution. This is not a superficial distinction, but a fundamental one because artists approach challenges differently than most people, and at the heart of that difference is the willingness of artists to embrace chaos. While most of us are trying to create order, artists tend to have a greater comfort level letting things get messy, not obliging them to make immediate sense, and following inspiration even when it pushes against reason. This is why art constantly breaks new ground, and why creative placemaking can generate original solutions to enduring challenges. “The art of creative placemaking” is the capacity to marry this chaotic artistic energy with diverse, complex public agendas and the skills necessary to execute work in the public sphere."


I subscribe to this thinking.  Embracing chaos does not mean pedestalizing chaos, but it perhaps means walking into an area with no paths, no clear escape routes --- and that implies some sense of faith that the wilderness experience (or hell for some) is not concomitant with chaos. This chaos is beyond the edge of predictability where curiosity stewarded by mindfulness, innovation, intuition, and a ready creative impulse still flags with a sometimes weak and hidden arm.  Hidden because, aren't  we are more comfortable with order, with rules. 

But are we.

 

Or do we learn to be more comfortable with steady order.

 

Like a difficult news image -- we turn our heads from disrupting chaos.


Don't look.


[caption: Image in chalk by Laura Momaney]


Ah, there it is. If we look, we may be motivated.   Motivation and status quo are uneasy co-workers in our souls. The above paragraph is Einstein's observation, paraphrased, the same thinking that made the problems is not the thinking to solve the problems.   Status quo works like inertia, what incredible strength to keep going down paths assigned.  Please stop contradicting the dictums.  Please.  Well, if please doesn't get results then coercion.  Yes, we can muster enough. 

<extract>

Read More ➤

This column is sponsored by Friends of the Sun


Column Open Mind

The Absurdity of “The One-Drop Rule”

Offie Wortham

Nov 15, 2014





Pie chart of my 7th grandchild, Sidney Ray Girard


The individual above will be called an African American, or Black, by many people in America. Why is this the case? Because of the One-Drop Rule!


This paper is calling for a national discussion on how to remove the practice of utilizing the racist One-Drop Rule to identify individuals or groups as Negroes, Blacks or African Americans. As difficult and challenging as it may be, it is time to become rational and logical and stop labeling individuals and entire populations with classifications and so-called “races” that are meaningless and at times ludicrous.


The One-Drop Rule is an historical, colloquial term in the United States that holds that a person with any trace of sub-Saharan ancestry, however small or invisible, cannot be considered White,  and unless said person has an alternative non-White ancestry they can claim, such as Native American, Asian, Arab, Australian aboriginal, they must be considered Black.


The Rule is an antiquated example of hypodescent, the automatic assignment of children of a mixed union between different socioeconomic or ethnic groups to the group with the lower status. Only by recognizing and changing instituted discrimination like the one-drop rule can we eventually live in the America so many of us have worked for during the past 50 years. We've got to start looking at this subject logically, and get rid of the old racial mythologies that have been holding our country back for so long. The legal notion of hypodescent has been upheld as recently as 1985, when a Louisiana court ruled that a woman with a black great-great-great-great-grandmother could not identify herself as “white” on her passport.


At first, the main purpose of the one-drop rule was to prevent interracial relationships, and thus keep Whites "pure." It was believed that the blood of Black people, or of other races than White, was “tainted.” It was also a way for slave owners to maintain ownership over descendents of former slaves. 


<extract> Read More ➤


Beyond the Horizon

Tasneem Tawfeek

Nov 17, 2014


Gazing outdoors from the inside of my home, under the comfort of my own covers, I often find myself pondering about the very issues that trouble me when it comes to the environment. The colors and views before me that accompany every season and every time of day- whether dawn, noon, or dusk, seem to speak volumes to me and I continue to wonder on the surrounding nature whose primary purpose is to soothe and comfort. I continue to speculate, I continue to question, I continue to wonder, and as I often stare upon the horizon especially as the sun sets, I continue to reflect beyond it. I continue to marvel at the spectrum of colors that our horizon lends to us at any moment of time and it seems that if we ask questions beyond our own horizon and attempt to see past the obvious limits before us, we will continue to realize that our environment needs more attention and raising awareness is the most crucial step in acquiring this attention. It seems that the horizon of our atmosphere serves as yet another focal point for concern and we can continue to remain voiceless or we can look beyond for solutions that will ultimately lead to a healthier planet, a healthier home, and a healthier horizon for us all.


Just recently, I began to better understand the issue of our ozone layer and the impact that ozone depletion has on the future scope of our planet. However, what exactly is the ozone layer and how does ozone depletion affect us? For starters, ozone depletion just happens to be one of the most troubling worldwide environmental problems. We may know the basics- that the Earth's atmosphere is divided into several layers, with each one serving an important role. The troposphere is where human activities take place such as flying small aircrafts or flying in hot air balloons. The next layer is called the stratosphere and it is in this layer in which the ozone layer of our Earth is found. The job of the ozone layer is to protect our planet from the dangerous UV rays of the sun. If not protected, the Earth could face some disastrous effects. Unfortunately, our current issue with the ozone layer is that it is slowly being depleted, being worn out, as a result of human actions, particularly as a result of substances being manufactured by certain industries.


<extracts> Read More ➤


The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014

                                                                        

Avid readers find themselves drawn to a book even though they are not familiar with the writer’s work or subject matter. Oddly enough, insights gleaned from that book relate precisely to the reader’s current circumstance and or/ questions. The brain works by physical connections. Memory works by connection.  People work by connection too. We are not isolated from others. Writers, painters, biologists, physicists arrive at similar theories although they have no connection with one another’s work and reside at opposite sides of the earth. We are all moving to a higher level of consciousness and if a piece of new information facilitates that process, it is vital to convey it to others even if they do not wish to hear it or accept it.


Dr.Rollo May, the famous psychoanalyst, in his book titled The Courage to Create points out that innovative creative thinkers have always been a threat to established society because the new ideas they champion destroy the structure and conventions of the established society. Picasso is quoted as having said that” to create means first to destroy.” We cannot forget those who have been crucified for ideas that challenged the norms of their times. The list is endless.  Although the individual is burnt at the stake or crucified, the idea he/she proposed, the vision remains intact and blooms like a flower over centuries.  Apes do not have a Jesus Christ or Joan of Arc.


Dr.Rollo May was fascinated with the creative process and the work produced through the fusion of the conscious and unconscious. He speaks of the “heightened consciousness” experienced when one is immersed in the act of creation: the feeling of floating suspended in time, the lack of appetite, the increase of heartbeat, the intense concentration, the sheer joy as if one were flying; indeed, one is released temporarily from our conception of time and space that Einstein regarded as illusion or our way of coping with our short life span by dividing time into past, present, and future. We cannot travel at the speed of light while here in our bodies on earth, but the artist and writer in the act of creation feels he/ she moves at the speed of light. Everything that has been muddied or dim is suddenly clarified and abnormally vivid: long buried memoires surface as if they are occurring now. Ideas that seemed vastly different form solid rational connections.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Column in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 15, 2014


Today I had the first Open House event at Golgonooza Letter Foundry & Press since losing my partner, Dan Carr. I did not know whether anyone would make the effort to come because of the weather, and I was prepared for a small turnout, having no idea who would come. That morning, as I made homemade eggnog with the fresh glass bottled milk from local Manning Hill Farm, I tried to keep up with all that needed doing by myself, crossing off items one by one on my to do list. People arrived throughout the afternoon despite the light  but steady snowfall, and I found myself surprised by each person that crossed my threshold and felt blessed by their presence. The love and caring they brought, their open hearts waiting to be warmed, deeply touched me and opened my own heart.


The absence of one person so very much a part of this place is something I never forget; it is as if the invisible world that we cannot describe opens up—that place of feeling, which is indeed the real place we live in. Whether a loved one is here or now only within us, this depth of the experience of loss, this acute awareness of the preciousness of this life—of these people, of these moments—is a thing to value.


I had the experience a few days ago, of thinking with my brain “oh, what really is this season of the holidays?” feeling ambiguous about its meaning—as if it is really just a different season, nothing that special in actual fact—then my feelings spoke up and answered to my thinking brain—that this season is a time when we as flawed and sometimes broken humans reach out to make efforts to bring others cheer, joy, happiness and comfort (ideally) and that this effort is something—in light of the short space of time we have here on earth—where we try to be in touch with our best selves. How can that be wrong or trite at its root? The beauty of simple generosity, caring and love, are some of our best attributes when expressed with truth and honesty.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Column Beer & Bangers

On the Road: A Visit to J.D McCliment’s Pub and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Terri Kneipp

Jun 30, 2014


The Beer & Bangers crew has been adventurous venturing far from their usual confines of the Big B into such foreign territory as Putney and Chester, VT.  The crew chooses locations based on the possibilities of either a good selection of brews and grub from past personal experience, word of mouth or sheer luck of stumbling upon an establishment. Not all who participate enjoy beer, so other beverages are explored including wine, cocktails and good ole ice tea being a connoisseur of the latter myself still learning the finer nuances of the heartier brews.


J.D. McCliment’s Pub (http://www.jdmcclimentspub.com/) in Putney is well established with a steady stream of customers, both local and visitors. Along with a casual, indoor dining area with a pool table upstairs, weather permitting there is an inviting outdoor deck. The beer selection was minimal with mostly bottled domestic beers with a Shale being one exception which was excellent. Ice tea was freshly brewed and decent, nothing exciting but fine. Now, the meat of the meal, so to speak, received mixed reviews. The Turkey Burger was thought good with the Ruben being perfectly acceptable. After that there was debate, one member thought the Fish and Chips fine, while one indicated the fish was over cooked. The Bratwurst was passable, but would not be had again with the Corned Beef being too salty. Overall the atmosphere was pleasant with adequate service, albeit slow which seems to be the rule in local pubs rather than the exception. The crew agreed they might to go back to enjoy an evening outside with lively conversation and a beverage of choice where food wasn’t the focus but accessible. It was noted that an authentic Scottish pub it was not; for that, one need only head to Chester.


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The Value of a Short Lived Amnesia

Jeri Rose

Oct 13, 2014


          The first time it happened I had traveled to Florida with my parents when I was ten. We had checked into a hotel and gone to sleep. My parents had a bed, but I had a cot against the wall. I had never slept in a cot before, and I was surprised to have to share a room with my parents. When I woke the next morning, my face was to the wall and everything was totally unfamiliar, so much so that I had no idea of where I was and had no idea of how I had gotten there. I lay there with a perfect amnesia wondering where I was and therefore who I was. I knew that I had been beaten or at least that I recalled, but was that all a dream disconnected from this reality that I was now in where I did not know how I had gotten there nor where I was? What was this life I had awakened to? I was completely confused until I looked out the window and saw the palm trees and then it all fell into place that I had traveled to this place in Florida from New York and the terror of my familial abuse was real and who I was no longer a fiction in a new unknown place.


          Tonight it happened again. I woke unable to think where I was. Specifically, I could not remember where the water I used came from. I knew that the last place I lived had a spring that we collected water from and put into large tanks which gravity fed to our home. I knew I was no longer there, but where was I now? I spent several minutes still partially asleep with closed eyes trying to think not where I was, but how water now came to us, and I could not dredge up the means of receiving this most precious resource. I ran the past method over and over in my head trying to think what the new mechanism for water delivery was. The miasm of confusion left when I woke enough to realize where I now live. Reality restored was a major relief.


          I cannot say that same relief occurred in the Florida situation. For a few moments, while I did not know who I was, the possibility that all the impossible insanity of having parents who beat me had been some dream from a nightmare meant that I was living an entirely different life. Being in a cot, meant that this life was poorer, as I was no longer in my lovely bed. I had been dreaming of some princess life where I was tortured. Now I was in a tawdry surrounding devoid of that palpable horror. When I got the connection of where I was and how I had gotten there, I knew my parents and their rage were real and not something I had concocted in a dream world. This was not a relief.


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Column Chess

Origins of Modern Chess

Phil Innes

Dec 9, 2014


Modern-day chess was invented in Valencia, say experts


THE rules of modern-day chess as we know it may have been invented in Valencia in the 15th century, according to a recent documentary filmed in the area.


It was based on the game Chaturanga, from India, before being adopted by the Persians and then brought to Europe by the Arabs, the programme reveals.


The end of the 1400s was a time of great economic and cultural splendour in the city of Valencia and its intellectual élite, who were mostly Jewish, adapted the existing rules of the game to make it more agile and speed it up. [caption: 1552 Hans Meulich (1516-1573) Duke Albrecht V. of Bavaria and his wife]


Until then, it was a very slow and sedentary process, but the Jewish upper classes altered it, basing it upon their perception of the courting ritual among the aristocracy and introduced the figure of the queen.


She had hitherto been known by the Arabs as the visir and was of a much more lowly status than the current chess queen.


The allegorical poem Scachs d’Amor, written jointly by three authors in 1475 in an early form of catalán, the language spoken on the east coast of Spain and which evolves into valenciano between the provinces of Castellón and Alicante, mentions the queen for the first time, proving that she was not, as originally believed, based upon Isabel of Castilla.


Scriptwriter and director Agustí Mezquida believes it is more likely the chess queen was based upon María of Castilla, consort of King Alfonso the Magnanimous, although chess expert Marilyn Yalom of Stanford University in the USA believes the chess queen does not come from one specific figure, but from several, since centuries ago queens began to play a much greater role in governing.


Some 20 years after the poem was written, the erudite Valencian Jew Francesch Vicent compiled and published the modern-day rules of chess under the title Llibre dels jochs partitis dels scachs en nombre de 100 (‘book of chess games in numbers of 100′), written in valenciano, and which was considered to be the ‘holy grail’ of books on the subject.

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Column Energetics  US and World Energy News

George Harvey   

¶ who is stopping us?


September 24 Energy News


Opinion:

¶   “300,000-Plus People March for Climate Action, In Pictures” The Sunday morning rush hour is not usually known for packing people into subway cars like sardines. But September 21, 2014 was not your average Sunday commute as hundreds of thousands showed up for the People’s Climate March. [Scientific American]


¶   “A strong economy depends on climate action” When we act on climate, we seize an opportunity to retool and resurge with new technologies, new industries and new jobs. We owe it to our kids not just to act, but to lead. When we do, we’ll leave them a cleaner, safer and opportunity-rich world for generations to come. [The Hill]


¶   “Climate action – who is stopping us?” Fossil fuel industries are the only obstacle to a safe future and a stable climate, says Greenpeace International executive director Kumi Naidoo. But even the rich in industrialized countries know that they can’t hide from devastating climate change in their gated communities. [eco-business.com]


Science and Technology:

¶   Growing use of natural gas fails to benefit the environment because it slows the spread of renewable energy sources, according to a study released today. While natural gas releases less carbon dioxide than coal when burned to produce electricity, it hampers growth of cleaner energy such as wind and solar. [Mynextfone]



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Column O Citoyen!


NOT Citizens' Breakfast

Robert Oeser

Nov 29, 2014


There will not be a Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast in either November or December; see you in 2015! 


If you ever wish to review or research past Breakfast presentations, an index can be found at this link: http://bit.ly/YkYQBx


While Not Breakfasts , the following events will be hosted at Senior Meals at the Gibson-Aiken Center:


On Wednesday December 3 at 12 noon   t here will be a "Lunch with the Chief," newly appointed Brattleboro Police Chief Michael Fitzgerald. The suggested donation for lunch is $6.00 ($3.50 for those over 60.) RSVP - 257-7570

On Saturday, December 20, at 5:00pm, there will be a free "Seniors' Holiday Dinner" with US Senator Bernie Sanders. RSVP by Friday, December 12 by calling either 1-800-339-9834 or 802-257-7570. Free transportation provided for Brattleboro Housing Authority residents .  


Other items of interest:


There is a movement afoot to encourage VT Attorney General Sorrell to join in with or otherwise support several jurisdictions (the State of Kentucky, the City of Chicago and the California counties of Orange and Santa Clara) who are suing pharmaceutical manufacturers under the theory that their aggressive marketing of synthetic opioids (e.g., Oxycontin) has resulted in spiraling addiction, health care costs and deaths.


Do you know who Jonathan Gruber is?  “What about that Obamacare guy who says the American people are stupid?” If you haven't been following the story, consider this analysis:   Read The Price of Ignorance.  


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Post Oil Solutions Commits to Weekly Protest Vigil at TD Bank


Tim Stevenson

Dec 8, 2014
      

On the basis of the two successful protest vigils that were held on recent Fridays, the  Climate Change Café project of Post Oil Solutions has decided to continue to hold weekly actions at the bank for the foreseeable future.

 

The protest vigils will be held on Fridays, from 12:00 noon to 1:00 PM during a day and time when working people typically do their banking, and will have two purposes . The first is to bring to the attention of the public the deep involvement that TD Bank has with tar sands, a fossil fuel that when extracted, processed and transported is more environmentally destructive than any other petroleum.

 

We will also encourage bank depositors to make a point of requesting that TD ask the bank to divest from TransCanada, the company that would build the Keystone XL pipeline.to transport tar sands across the United States to the Gulf Coast for shipment abroad.

 

At a time when the world needs to be seriously reducing its burning of carbon polluting fuels in order to avoid climate catastrophe, and hence, cease the drilling and extraction of fossil fuels, along with the construction of the necessary infrastructure, TD Bank is serving as a major investor in the proposed Keystone XL project and other tar sands pipelines.

 

TD Bank Group (TD) is a giant global network of financial institutions owned by Toronto-Dominion  The conglomerate includes TD Asset Management and TD Bank. one of the ten ;largest banks in the U.S. Together with Toronto-Dominion, TD Asset Management collectively owned over $1.8 billion in TransCanada stock, as of March 31, 2014, making TD the second largest shareholder in the company that would build the Keystone XL pipeline.

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Column The Great Adventure

The Feminine in the Twenty-first Century

Like A Girl

Terri Kneipp

Jul 1, 2014


Yes! Like A Girl


Wow. I feel remiss. Evidently I was supposed to feel responsible for the inappropriate ways men have ogled me since I was 12 or to think only girls should have to dress conservatively for school. This week has been full of stereotypical negative phrases, images and responsibilities about or toward girls and women being bandied about, discussed in multiple arenas, debated ad nauseam in other words, my mind is spinning. Between school dress codes to a broader discussion on modest dress to limiting phrases, let’s dive into the deep end.


Early in the week on a ladies forum, the talk turned to modest dress: what was appropriate, how to help men behave themselves, should cleavage be shown or not, etc. This in itself is a powder keg ready to start a maelstrom. My first thought was that it’s not my job to “help men” control their impulses; but, also that it was demeaning to men, assuming they couldn’t control themselves. Give the guys some credit: they all aren’t lecherous, leering dolts who are unable to be respectful using common decorum in every day life. Luckily, I found a video for Christian men from a Christian man (http://johnpavlovitz.com/2014/06/20/young-men-sex-and-urge-ownership-and-why-its-not-the-girls-problem/), so if you are not a Christian, you may not see an issue, that isn’t the point. My point is taking the responsibility for any action off of anyone other than the person who is committing the action. If a crime is committed, it should never be the victim’s fault.  If I choose to wear a tank top that shows a little cleavage, heaven forbid, because it is summer, I have an ample chest and it’s freaking hot and some man stares, that’s on him. I am not dressing a certain way to elicit a given response, but I am also not going to over react unless the behavior is obnoxious and intrusive. Being bundled from head to toe in puffy ski gear, I have had men make comments that weren’t appreciated and I dealt with them as any mature woman would, swiftly, clearly and leaving no doubt of my meaning. With that said, dressing fairly modestly is what works for me.


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This column is sponsored by Delectable Mountain Cloth

BOMBSHELLS

The Devastating Mistakes of Abstract Perception

– and how to disarm them through awareness of ‘natural inclusion’


PART ONE

Alan Rayner

Oct 2, 2014





PREVIEW

Abstract perceptions of reality always either encase natural phenomena entirely within non-existent boundary limits, or entirely disregard any source of distinction between natural forms and their surroundings and neighbours.  Unlike natural boundaries, such as skin, abstract boundaries are simplified, orderly and definitive. They completely isolate the insides from the outsides of things and places. Hence they treat Nature either as a whole object in itself, or as a collection of whole objects that are divisible into fractional parts and separated from one another by variable amounts of space and time.  In conventional mathematics, these entities are defined as numerical and geometric figures (discrete numbers and shapes) and in conventional language they are defined as nouns (discrete subjects and objects). Energetic actions of various kinds upon or between these entities are defined as verbs. For the sake of convenient calculation, description and argumentation, Nature is frozen into isolated units of space, energy, time and matter within a superimposed frame of reference that does not actually exist.  The only envisaged alternative to this categorization is to merge all into formlessness. As the pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, Heraclitus, understood, however, nature is always and only properly imagined as variably fluid. Fluidity rules everywhere, and space, time, energy and matter can neither be separated from one another as isolated entities nor united into absolute singularity. 


Through our human habit of imposing these abstract boundary limits onto nature, we introduce something fundamentally anti-natural into our worldview, which not only steers us away from perceiving true nature, but disrupts and damages our natural neighbourhood in a huge variety of ways. Because this habit has such a tenacious grip on our thinking, it can be called "abstract fundamentalism". We adhere to it because we (both in Academia and in society at large) think it is sufficiently useful and correct to "freeze" nature into abstract entities, and to relate with nature as if these entities actually existed.  They do not, and the consequences of living and thinking as if they do have brought devastating consequences for us, psychologically, socially and environmentally.


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Op Ed

Witness to Genocide: Israel/ Palestine: A JOURNEY TO PEACE

The Op Ed writer is

Namaya

Aug 24, 2014



We are all tremendously saddened by the ongoing wars in Israel and Palestine, but it is a war that few Americans and outsiders can full understand.  Namaya, the poet and performance artist, has created this program “Witness to Genocide:ISRAEL/ PALESTINE: A JOURNEY TO PEACE and would like to present this at your school, church, or community center.


A trailer sample can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CltHSUoHr0&feature=plcp


This is a multimedia performance on the narrative of the Jewish Diaspora, the Palestinian people, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine (West Bank and Gaza.)  The performance combines stories, music, poetry, photography, and art based on Namaya’s story of living and working in Yemen, Morocco, and his travels through Palestine, Israel, and the Islamic world.  Namaya also speaks of his Jewish family’s journey out of Eastern Europe through such stories as “L’Chaim” and of Jewish life during the Diaspora.


Caption: Witness – in commemoration of Krystallnacht and the occupation of Palestine, in the witness that there can be peace in Palestine and a future for the children of Israel & Palestine.


Namaya said, “I tell this story out of necessity. In witnessing the destruction of our Jewish communities through pogroms and the holocaust, having touched the walls of Prague and Budapest with the names of my extended family who perished, and also seeing the present inhumane occupation of Palestine… I am obligated to tell this story. In telling I hope to create an opportunity for a future for the children of Israel and Palestine.”

The  program is a one person performance with multimedia, art work, and music.  It can be performed in a theater, school, or gallery space. At the end of the performance, there is an opportunity for discussion of the performance in the spirit of compassionate listening.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Real Food ! 

White Stew

Phil Innes

Oct 19, 2014


This is a stew where all the ingredients are white or nearly so, and you can vary ingredients to suit yourself, even adding one colorful thing for contrast.


Get starting by sautéeing some onion and if you use it, celery — this makes both much sweeter. I also pre-cooked some chicken by frying it until 2/3rd cooked, then removing bone from thighs. You could as well boil the chicken and reserve the stock for the stew. Breast meat ‘looks better’ but has less taste and chunky texture. For a vegetarian stew add marinated tofu instead.


I also used an unusual vegetable, white eggplant [illus]. Cut into coins, and mix with plentiful oil in large bowl, sauté.


Otherwise in a large pot successively add some or all these ingredients:


Chicken

Garlic [rough chopped]

Eggplant

Onion

Celery

Parsnip

Turnip

Potato

Tofu

Mushrooms

Seasoning [I used a lemon-garlic mix]


Liquid should just cover ingredients.


You can finish the stew by adding cream to it at the end with the heat off, or perhaps serve plain Greek yoghurt at the table. Serve over rice or with chunky bread.

<extract>

Graphic Traffic

An orientation to illustration and illustrated books for writers

By Marlene O’Connor on Jan 16, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views

Street Dance – Flight, personal piece


Here are illustrations of Marlene’s work and she has also contributed notes on how to sensibly engage graphic artists, illustrators and publishers as a generous addition to orienting the writer to the subject.  

Read More

This column is sponsored by www.zephyrdesignsvt.com


Dec 28th, 2011

Photo Brooks House Fire


Things started quietly enough with normal amounts of snow but the people in the municipal building could hardly anticipate multiple disasters in 2011  

Read More


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Last Entry Mac Gander

Photo Rudyard Kipling at Naulakha near Brattleboro.


130 years ago in 1880/81 Rudyard Kipling completed the 26 question questionnaire. Kipling subsequently moved to Brattleboro and Dummerston, living here from 1892 to 1896.


At the time it is said that Kipling was known by more people in the world than was any other person. I would like to publish your own responses in Vermont Views Magazine to the very same questions Kipling answered.




Please add your answers below the 26 questions on the questionnaire page, or write in for a set of emailed questions.


Read More


StudioONE

Len Emery


The Project:

Goffstown Slaughterhouse


Here is a small representative sample of a fairly large project at a slaughterhouse in Goffstown.


The Photographer

Len Emery


"I come from an engineering background with all of its inflexibility and predefinition. Conversely, photography is often fleeting and very much undefined. I try to capture the image as it happens, the instant framed from my perspective for all to see my interpretation. I try to use the environment as an element of the image, allowing it to enhance and sometimes be the image. I then try to draw the viewer into the image as I was drawn in when I first saw it.


I am a pilot as well as a photographer and use my flying skills and camera together when doing contract aerial photography. All of my photos are typically of Vermont and in particular the villages and valleys of the Black River basin area.


See More ➤


Studio TWO

Featuring

April at Gallery 2 Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works.

Featured in this photo exhibit are blue glass by Ed Branson [illustrated]; painting of sugaring by Paul Madalinski; horse by Joseph Fichter; circus photos by Jeffrey Lewis; stained glass canoe by David Wissman; paintings by Dane Tilghman. See More ➤


Studio 3

A seven color print, ‘Migration’, by William Hays


William Hays, printmaker

To view the images sequentially, click the link to Studio 3 and press ‘Play Slideshow.’

To illustrate a companion article on print making by Brattleboro artist William Hays, the subject kindly forwarded me these 7 images of a print in the making. The full article will appear as a Monthly Feature.  See More ➤


Studio 4

Group Photo Shoot

October 20, 2014

“Not far from Main Street”


Len Emery

Phil Innes

Merritt Brown

Greg Worden


See More ➤


If You Lived Here

Dr. Vardana Shiva’s Talk about Vermont’s GMO Labeling Law

Nov 17, 2014 



Post Oil Solutions is pleased to announce that we will screen a taped recording of the talk given by the internationally recognized scientist and activist, Dr. Vandana Shiva, in Burlington on 2 November, about Vermont’s GMO labeling law .

 

This event will be held on Tuesday, December 2, 6:00 PM, Brooks Memorial Library meeting room.

 

The event is free, and light refreshments will be provided.

 

For further information: 802.869.2141 or info@postoilsolutions.org

Read More ➤


If You Lived Elsewhere

Rough Tor

  Aug 20, 2014



Rough Tor


Rough is pronounced ‘row’ to rhyme with ‘cow’. Rough Tor (/ˈraʊtər/ row-ter), or Roughtor, is a tor on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. The site is composed of the tor summit and logan stone, a neolithic tor enclosure, a large number of Bronze Age hut circles, and some contemporary monuments.


From the summit of Rough Tor, many signs of settlements and field systems are visible, indicating that it was a well populated area in former times.

Neolithic


The summit of Rough Tor once had a neolithic tor enclosure. The summit is encircled by a series of rough stone walls that align with natural stone outcroppings on the tor. The walls would have originally completely encircled the tor. The walls would have had numerous stone lined openings. In the interior of the circle there are remains of terraces leveled into the slopes, which archaeologists believe formed the foundations of circular wooden houses. There are also cleared areas near the terraces that have been garden plots.

Bronze Age


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Aural, Oral, Verbal, Spoken



What is it to be? When an NPR reporter can say of a Supreme Court ruling: “...now we shall see what the oral reports will be...” we are certainly mixing our matadors!


Aural relates to hearing; Oral, ‘of the mouth’; Verbal and Spoken reference speech, and a choice whether you like Latin or English terms.


But you cannot ‘see’ any of these.


Overhear More ➤



Curious Topics


1,ooo year old Bowthorpe Oak


A GIANT OAK TREE at Bowthorpe Park Farm, Manthorpe, on the A6121, three miles south west of Bourne, has earned a place in the Guinness Book of Records and in 1998 was the subject of a short film on television about its size and longevity.

Read More  ➤

send any answers or comments to onechess@comcast.net

100 Years Ago

Feature:  August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014





Caption: German soldiers embarking for the front


August 1

The German Empire declares war on the Russian Empire, following Russia's military mobilization in support of Serbia; Germany also begins mobilization. France orders general mobilization. New York Stock Exchange closed due to war in Europe, where nearly all stock exchanges are already closed.


August 2

German troops occupy Luxembourg in accordance with its Schlieffen Plan. A secret treaty between the Ottoman Empire and Germany secures Ottoman neutrality. At 7:00 pm (local time) Germany issues a 12-hour ultimatum to neutral Belgium to allow German passage into France.


August 3

Germany declares war on Russia's ally, France.

At 7:00 am (local time) Belgium declines to accept Germany's ultimatum of August 2.



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Local History

May 5, 2013


A lyrical homage by Charles Monette



With 1878’s best intentions, some sturdy men began

Building Brattleboro’s narrow gauge in the southeast kingdom

Upside verdant country, the West River, to South Londonderry

Financed by bankers’ bonds bought in towns’ river valleys

Read More



Sep 7, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views


A photo essay of 40 images and caption


“Before The Fall”



Read More



Reviews Old & New


The Illusion of Separation


Giles Hutchins new book is now released.


‘Cutting through habitual denials and academic evasions, Giles Hutchins exposes the delusion at the root of our planetary crisis.  And with a holographic richness of resources and disciplines, he discloses—indeed activates—the attitude that might just provoke our needed evolution. This is a wise and urgent text: may it be heard, and soon!’ Catherine Keller, Professor of Constructive Theology, Drew University, author of On the Mystery

 

‘An amazing tour de force, the intellectual tour of our lives…Never before, that I know of, has the choice of life, true life, or the path of degradation been put before us with such clear equanimity.’ Robert Sardello, PhD, author of Love and the Soul: Creating a Future for Earth.

 

‘Wonderful…well written, well researched and full of insight, this book will open your heart and mind…’ Stephan Harding, Head of Holistic Science, Schumacher College, author of Animate Earth

 

‘With clarity and insight Giles Hutchins analyses the roots of our present collective mindset of separation, and yet shows how science and spirituality point to a deeper, inclusive consciousness. Here are signposts for a future that is vitally needed in the present moment, if we dare to cross the threshold...’    Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, PhD, Sufi teacher and author, Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth.

 

‘A treasure of a book that I will share widely… a brilliantly written insightful tour de force’   Chris Laszlo, PhD, author of Flourishing Enterprise: The New Spirit of Business

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Brattleboro Skyline

A massive photo essay with captions

Jun 11, 2014


The Slow Living Summit and The Strolling of the Heifers 2014


Read More ➤


Localvore Directory

Click this link for locally grown and manufactured food products and how to find them directly


To add your business to the free listing of Localvores — contact the publisher at onechess@comcast.net


Phone numbers, websites, e-mails, travel directions and hours of business of a few dozen local farms and businesses making Vermont food products. Support your local food economy!


Just Added — Full Plate Farm

 

Full Plate Farm is a one acre vegetable farm conveniently located one and a half miles from downtown Brattleboro, VT.  We grow over 100 varieties of delectable, nutritious veggies using organic practices. We offer a CSA which includes all of our veggies, as well as berries and sweet corn from a few other local farms. We offer 12 different share options, so that you can choose how much produce you get and when. We also offer options between some of the veggies in your share as well as a “swap box” so that you will always have a choice to trade out a veggie you don’t like for one you do. Every week we include recipes and cooking suggestions. 


Read More ➤


This column is sponsored by the Brattleboro Food Coop http://brattleborofoodcoop.coop


Write On!

Swirlin’ shadows of the moon

Charles Monette

Nov 18, 2014


Swirling white serrated cirrus clouds circled, forming a phalanx that shone light bright before shadows of the half full moon.  Lying on a bed in an unfinished room gazing in wonder at this night sky, I felt be twitched… a lone star peeking through in the southwest corner of the windowpane.  Twinkling at me.  Lonely cold apple trees stood their ground hardly moving in the wind still quiet now just 30 yards away.


I was about to go naked metaphysically, you know, reconciliation, spinning out, reunion with spirit.  I took off my resurrection boots, followed my Yang thread, and began letting go of my beliefs in dreamtime.  This big night sky was magnificent, subtly changing hues amid darkness trying to envelop it.


Hoping to receive my new spiritual vision, I sensed upheaval behind the starry night.  Ghost was at my side, eyes pleading for another duck fillet, at least a mid sized dog biscuit.  Ghost didn’t care if it was gluten free.  We walked, he barked once or twice, and I thought of making something manifest in the physical world. 


I thought of Paul Tillich and the Resurrection, connecting with earth, opening my heart to compassion a la Thich Nhat Hanh.  Flush, go naked… reboot!  But was that all?  I thought of the sorrows of Mary for the first time… it was about time… thought of travel along the continuum of past present future, often referred to as now.  Now what Einstein?


I thought of costumed ladies of eleven days ago.  Besmirching their lipstick before smooching their dogs as they sat round  bonfires watching a restless man throw in a stick or two.  They began free association rituals, chanting guttural, Tibetan bowls singing in fractured disharmony around medicine wheels.


<extract> Read More ➤


Are you wearing Dhaka?

When it comes to fashion, applying even the most modest ethical criteria is ridiculously hard. All the big chains – including Primark, which had a supplier in the destroyed Rana Plaza building on Dhaka's outskirts, and has promised "to provide support where possible" to the families of the 187 workers known to have died – have ethics policies that can be viewed online. None has a clearly labelled and readily availably Fairtrade or equivalent line on the shop floor.


Read More ➤



Archive

Hundreds of previous articles



A collection of contributed work, articles and columns from around the community, including transcripts from 80+ recorded interviews from the ‘In Conversation With’ series.


Go to Archive ➤


Vermont Views Magazine

Unless otherwise stated all content claimed copyright © 2010 and 2014

all rights reserved by Vermont Views Magazine

vermontviews.org 


Write for permissions to reprint or extract,

to the publisher at


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Articles,  Features, Columns & Galleries

  New Articles

Two 1,000 year old wooden objects: top is the Bowthorpe Oak, read more at Curious topics here. Bottom is The Oseberg viking ship at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. The first Native American to arrive in Europe may have been a woman brought to Iceland by the Vikings more than 1,000 years ago, a study by Spanish and Icelandic researchers suggests.


Photos of the Day sponsored by:

Fine Art

&

Contemporary American Craft

106 Main St.   Brattleboro, VT 05301  

www.vtart.com    (802) 257-7044

  Passages Daily  Concentration



“Do stuff. Be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration's shove or society's kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It's all about paying attention. attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. Stay eager.”

Susan Sontag


“In those days a boy on the classical side officially did almost nothing but classics. I think this was wise; the greatest service we can to education today is to teach few subjects. No one has time to do more than a very few things well before he is twenty, and when we force a boy to be a mediocrity in a dozen subjects we destroy his standards, perhaps for life.”

C.S. Lewis


“Normally, we do not so much look at things as overlook them.”

Alan W. Watts


“Concentration is a cornerstone of mindfulness practice. Your mindfulness will only be as robust as the capacity of your mind to be calm and stable. Without calmness, the mirror of mindfulness will have an agitated and choppy surface and will not be able to reflect things with any accuracy.”

Jon Kabat-Zinn


“Jobs also used the meetings to enforce focus. At Robert Friedland's farm, his job had been to prune the apple trees so that they would stay strong, and that became a metaphor for his pruning at Apple. Instead of encouraging each group to let product lines proliferate based on marketing considerations, or permitting a thousand ideas to bloom, Jobs insisted that Apple focus on just two or three priorities at a time. " There is no one better at turning off the noise that is going on around him," Cook said. " That allows him to focus on a few things and say no to many things. Few people are really good at that.”

Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs

 

To This Degree


An image a day every day of the year

   


Today: A flag bearer in a battle


The noble accepted subservience of the individual to the collective values and goals


CONSECRATION TO AN IDEAL

   

Dec 17 2014 Sagittarius 26 (16° to 30° Sagittarius is TRANSFERENCE in Act 3, GROUP-INTEGRATION)

 

Guest Article

Fog on the River


[a poem inspired by an image]


Terri Kneipp




Fog on the river

The morning arriving with a chill

Slowly climbing out of bed

Tentatively putting feet to the hard, cold floor

Sun streaming in the window

Spider dangling from his web

An unsuspecting multi-colored leaf caught in the intricate weaving

Dangling, suspended in the air

The first signs of fall appearing


Fog on the mountain

Driving down the highway vibrant colors to behold

Slow going as the thickness swallows

Sounds of geese moving on for the season

Leaving for their seasonal home

Startling the silence of the early morning


<extract>

Read More ➤

 

Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Sheila Sackett



SK: Hello! This is Sheila.


Vt Views: Hello Sheila! The good part about this conversation is that Alex already gave a big overview of the Coop [recorded April 2010], past, present and regenerative future – just as the Fire Chief did for the FD, and the Rescue chief … that means we can talk about food! You don’t have to talk about the Coop at all! [some preamble taken out] I usually ramble away like this until my conversation partner thinks, ‘pathetic!’ and takes over. [laughter] But actually, I am also a cook and I’ve been cooking for 15 years, and for several of them actually cooking things that people want to eat! And I looked at all your food out there and I can say to you that I can cook as well as you can! I can cook any one of those dishes without a recipe – given about 3 hours, for 6 people; but you are producing this high quality food – incidentally famous in the town – so that you have twenty or thirty portions per dish, and a dozen dishes, every day… so, I guess you win. [laughter] Of course, it’s not just the amount of food, it’s the quality of it – this is famously the best place to eat lunch in town – don’t you think?


SK: I do think! I do. I’m blessed with an amazing staff – that’s the thing. And even before I started working here I walked into the Coop on the advice of a friend who knew that I had moved to the area, and who told me not to miss the Brattleboro Food Coop, it’s right up your alley, you’ll love it. So I came in to get something to eat and saw the deli – and right away I was just taken with it. It reminded me a lot of the early days of my career starting off in a natural food store that was really small and trying to find it’s way, trying to grow. It took me right back to that.


Vt Views: I remember the early days around here of small stores – everyone was making tuna sandwiches with sprouts in – that was a sort of standard alternative.


SK: Yes. And everyone making precious little platters of vegetarian dishes, and it was all very touchy feely and crunchy…


Vt Views:  …selling as many as 50 a day


SK: And then you were done for the day, then you’d go home, and come in the next day and think what you were going to cook today. All very romantic and lovely, but it does not anyway sustain a business if you want to go long-term.


SK: When I started working here that was the focus for me, to help this Coop get from the stage I found them at which was… you know, successful, loyal following, doing pretty well with what they do – but how to take that into something really significant in terms of sales volume production. How to get over that hurdle of just thinking for the day, and how to plan systems that can produce mass quantities… and not lose the quality, not lose the essence, that’s the secret.


Vt Views: I interrupted you before, and here’s another one – when did you come in and look at the food, and subsequently take the job?


SK: 2004.


Vt Views: Did you stride into the kitchen and just announce, ‘OK I just need to be here!’ [Laughter]


SK: It was an amazing case of timing – that’s what it was – I came in for lunch and happened to have a resume in the car – I wen to the front desk to ask if they had any openings, thinking even if I could work at the deli counter and have a part-time job until I find something real, it’s something to do where I could fit in really well… so I went to the front end and they said they had no openings.


SK: So I said ‘that’s OK, I’ll leave my resume and I’d like to fill out an application anyway, you never know what comes up.’ Diane was there at the front desk and gave me the stuff which I filled out, and I was going to just turn it in when I asked instead, ‘would it be possible to meet whoever is in charge of the deli?’


SK: So, this man came out and I introduced myself and said, ‘I don’t know if you are ever looking for help, but this is what I do. I love your store, this is terrific, and if we can help each other out, give me a call.’


SK: And it just turns out that he was looking for a kitchen manager. He was the food services director at that time and had got to the point where he realized that he wanted someone to run his kitchen. So… perfect timing!


SK: He hired me and then it was a real case of getting in here and recognizing that I had a lot of experience and a pretty strong background, but if I come in here like some bat out of hell, you know, you have to give these people credit because they had developed something very, very good.  So I didn’t want to come in and just change everything, and point out immediately what they have been doing wrong all these years… that’s not a good way to build loyalty! So I was very quiet and came in and watched, observed, looked, and let them train me, let them show me what they wanted me to do.


SK: Later on when it became time to start doing some tweaking or changing I had a lot of support, a lot of buy-in from these people, because they knew I wasn’t just power-hungry or egomaniacal.


Vt Views: Not a Gordon Ramsey at the Coop.


SK: O! As entertaining as I find him – and he is one of my favorites – that is not the way to get people to want to stay with you.


<extracts> Read More ➤

 


DUSTY DEATH (Part 3)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014


And all our yesterdays have lighted fools

The way to dusty death. ~ Shakespeare




Even worse was the fate of a man who was found, according to the headline of his 1936 obituary, Hanging By Belt to Bedpost. Body of George Nygren Found in Chestnut Street Home. Had Lain Dead for Three Days. 


The body of this 46-year-old Estey Organ employee was almost fully dressed when found.  “Apparently Nygren had buckled his own belt about his neck and a post at the foot of the bed and then slid off the bed to the floor.  It is thought that he may have been delirious before committing the act, for a pillow had been torn up and the feathers scattered about the room. None of the furniture had been disturbed.”


Enough detail for you? But wait, there’s more: “An empty pitcher and bottle beside the bed bore evidence that Nygren had been drinking a short time before his death. In another room a partly filled 10-gallon crock of home brew was found. A Swedish newspaper and Friday night’s edition of the Reformer were lying on the bed but later papers had not been removed from the mailbox. Four quart milk bottles were found on the front porch, the contents of two being partly consumed.  His sister was unable to say what had brought on his feeling of depression.”


It would be difficult for me to explain why I could spend hours reading these obituaries, why I am so fascinated by the heavy peace of a graveyard. Briefly, the best I can say is that when I immerse myself in the shades of the dead, I feel a powerful love. 


I love them all for drawing breath. I genuinely cherish whatever hopes they had, anxieties, dreams and disappointments, small plans, big plans, passions, convictions and pain, quirks, virtues, errors and sins, their holidays, their hobbies, things they feared most, things they loved best, their waking up each morning, their going to bed at night, their oblivious birth and oblivious death. I want to raise them all back up in a judgment day of respect for their struggle.  I want to grant them immortality, if only for a moment, by lamenting the fact that their vastly human experience should be reduced to curt words etched on tombstones and the efforts of those left behind to endow their obituaries with scenes and significance.


So far the best story I have read in the obituary column of the Brattleboro Reformer is exactly that, a story. It’s a story about the final hours of Rensselaer Nourse, a John Henry-like man who was frequently employed by Rudyard Kipling because of his “skilled workmanship and good judgment.”


One day in 1897, Rensselar Nourse was helping the men employed in filling a silo for RM Pratt. “He was pushing the cornstalks along the feed table of the ensilage cutter to the man standing next to him on the right.  It was light work and required little strength. He had come to Mr. Pratt’s a short time before 10:00 that morning to help in the beneficent work which was being done on that occasion. It was quite generally known that he had had a slight shock some three or more weeks ago while working on the highway but he was able to resume work shortly afterwards.


“Nourse was a large, muscular man and when it was explained to him by one of the men that no invitation had been sent to him because it was supposed he was not in usual health, he straightened back his broad shoulders and said, ‘Where can you find a stronger looking man than I am?’ 


“He had been working about 20 minutes when Mr. Sergent, his near neighbor, came to him and offered to ‘spell’ him at his work. 


“’No, I am all right,’ he said and those were his last words. Ten minutes afterward he was seen to sway over and was caught by DW Blood and laid gently on the ground. Life was extinct and all efforts to restore him to consciousness availed nothing.”


Rest in peace, Rensselar Nourse. Your life force, your spirit, the impression you made on others, sustained you to the last.

<extract> Read More ➤

 

Weather

17 Dec





from NOAA

The National Weather Service


Brattleboro:


Showers likely, mainly before 10am. Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy, with a high near 39. Calm wind becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.


Tonight
A chance of rain and snow showers before 9pm, then a chance of snow showers. Cloudy, with a low around 30. West wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.


National:


Snow forecast for Great Lakes and northern New England; wet weather continues across California


A weather system moving across the Great Lakes will combine with a developing coastal storm to bring snow showers to the Great Lakes and northern New England on Wednesday. Meanwhile, a series of Pacific storms will bring moderate to heavy rainfall along the California coast, along with snow to the higher elevations of the Sierra Nevada.  


Vermont Views

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Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack from her title

Art & Soul

A PERSONAL TEST


I’ve rejected the idea of working life-size or of using body casts for my sculpture. The enlargement or reduction in scale reaffirms its nature as an artifact; the sculpture is not just a replication. It has been particularly curious and difficult to reduce an adult model down to a four-foot height.


The struggle of my brain, in scanning the model and reducing the scale with no mechanical assistance, has been a test.

 

Monkey’s Cloak

Secondhand Nightmare




Mac Gander


Haunted by stars, night like ice

Feels good on my face—in the parking lot


All the new cars have balloons drifting over them,

Primary colors floating in the neon air,


Another talisman—like a word for hope

In a language you don’t speak. So sure,


Show me where the bodies lie.

I will caress them, feel the ash in my hands.


I don’t mind it, I have been

Places farther than this one, sweet boy


With trinkets locked on your neck,

I know the sorrow you feel—I feel it, too—I do—


The empty church at nightfall, the white steeple

Stretching just far enough to the sky


To remind us of our losses. I get it.

Kiss me now. Good. Now kiss me again.


Read More ➤

 

Daily Articles

To This Degree

An image a day for every day of the year.


Passages


Weather

Local & National


Pretty Often

Art & Soul

Notes on Creating


Caption It

If you can


New

Feature

Articles


Feature

Guest Article

Fog on the River

a poem inspired by an image

Terry Kneipp



Column

in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 16, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak


Is This What Christmas is All About?

Terri Kneipp



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Secondhand Nightmare

Mac Gander



Column

4our

Our Eyes

Matti Salminen

Dec 13, 2014



Feature

Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Sheila Sackett

Dec 11, 2014



Column

Chess

Origins of Modern Chess

Phil Innes

Dec 9, 2014


Column

Untitled Work

Education, Training, and Oppression:

The Fate of Learning in the Digital Age

Mac Gander

Dec 8, 2014



NEW Column

Consolations of History

DUSTY DEATH (Part 1)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014



Feature

Selected Letters

Enough Whining

Paul Truong

Dec 4, 2014




Special Feature

“Virtually There”

The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 1 — Introduction


Column

Articulate

The order of chaos

Kate Anderson

Dec 1, 2014


Column

Post Oil Solutions

Climate Change Café Screens “Cowspiracy, The Sustainability Secret”

Tim Stevenson

Nov 30, 2014



Column

4our

A Ride Through the Mist

Nanci Bern

Nov 30, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

An Exhale of Air

(A Ferguson Poem)

Nanci Bern


Column

Untitled Work

Dear Father

Mac Gander

Nov 26, 2014


Column

Post Oil Solutions

Climate justice or climate fascism?

Tim Stevenson

Nov 25, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

On Buzzed Bugs

Lloyd Graf



Column

4our

Explorative Mind

Matti Salminen

Nov 21, 2014



Article

Vermont Diary

Faster than a speeding bicycle



Column

Chess

Barbie, Sexism, Chess & Engineering

Phil Innes

Nov 19, 2014



Feature

Write On!

Swirlin’ shadows of the moon

Charles Monette

Nov 18, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Beyond the Horizon

Tasneem Tawfeek

Nov 17, 2014


Column

Post Oil Solutions

Protest Rally at Brattleboro TD Bank

Tim Stevenson

Nov 16, 2014



Column

Open Mind

The Absurdity of “The One-Drop Rule”

Offie Wortham

Nov 15, 2014


Article

Overheard

Aural, Oral,

Verbal, Spoken


Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Late Autumn

Andrea Wallens Powell



Feature

Write On!

Words For Translation Into Any Language

Mac Gander

Nov 11, 2014



Column

4our

Rear View Mirror

Laura Momaney

Nov 10, 2014



Column

Post Oil Solutions

November Climate Change Cafe:

Stopping Big Oil—What Can We do?

Tim Stevenson

Nov 9, 2014


Column

in between

“When you are in Tune with the Unknown, the Known is peaceful.”

Julia Ferrari

Nov 9, 2014




Vermont Diary

Why Shumlin Only Squeaked Through

Nov 6, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Two poems I AM and Romantics

Michael Cioffi



Guest Article

Gov. Shumlin’s remarks, City Hall Burlington, Nov. 5

[full text]



Column

Open Mind

Kwanza, Is It A Class or a Race Thing?

Offie Wortham

Nov 6, 2014



Vermont Diary

Ashuelot, Northfield mentioned

Nov 2, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

THE GEOGRAPHY OF DESIRE

Terry Hauptman



Column

O Citoyen!

About Fairpoint — A Letter

Robert Oeser

Oct 30, 2014



Column

Open Mind

Being Present is The Only Good Option for True Mental Health

Offie Wortham

Oct 28, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

run’way

Phil Innes



Column

Untitled Work

True Story with Metaphor

Mac Gander

Oct 26, 2014



Column

4our

Upon Getting Ready for Samhain (Halloween)–Why Are There No Mirrors in Tarot Cards?

Nanci Bern

Oct 25, 2014



Studio 4

Group Photo Shoot

October 20, 2014

“Not far from

Main Street”



Write On!

Pablo and the Chief

Charles Monette

Oct 21, 2013



Real Food !

White Stew

Phil Innes

Oct 19, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak

Two Poems: Rough & A Waltz For Two

Michael Cioffi



Special Feature

An American in Cornwall

Oct 10, 2014



Column

4our

Mind Eternal

Matti Salminen

Oct 17, 2014




Real Food !

Meatballs

Mac Gander

Oct 16, 2014



Vermont Diary

An unusual Diet

Oct 15, 2014




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Value of a Short Lived Amnesia

Jeri Rose

Oct 13, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Library where everything is forgotten

Charles Monette



Real Food !

Braised pork-chops in tomatoes

Mac Gander

Oct 12, 2014



Column

Untitled Work

Summer’s End

Mac Gander

Oct 10, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

REQUIEM

For Anna Akhmatova

(1889-1966)

Terry Hauptman




Column

4our

Learning for Enrichment

Matti Salminen

Oct 7, 2014



Real Food !

Roasting a whole chicken and living off it for a week

Mac Gander

Oct 6, 2014




Guest Article

Beyond capitalism

Donnie Maclurcan




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

When are we too young?

Jeri Rose

Oct 4, 2014



Column

Natural Inclusivity

BOMBSHELLS

The Devastating Mistakes of Abstract Perception

Alan Rayner

Oct 2, 2014



Real Food !

Red Sauce,

White Sauce

Mac Gander

Oct 1, 2014



Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Eugene Uman

Sep 30, 2014



Column

Open Mind

Recommendations for Controlling Lobbying

In the

Vermont Legislature

Offie Wortham

Sep 29, 2014



A Word In Your Ear

Khaleesis replacing Amelias?

Not hardly

Sep 26, 2014


Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute

Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014



Column

Old Lady Blog

The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014



Column

Energetics 

US and World Energy News

George Harvey

who is stopping us?

Sept 24, 2014



Column

4our

The Lastlings

Nanci Bern

Sep 22, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Fall

Tasneem Tawfeek

Sep 20, 2014



Column

Natural Inclusivity

Mistaking emotion for lack of reason

Alan Rayner

Sep 19, 2014




Vermont Diary


Strange brew

Sep 18, 2014




Column

Untitled Work

The Language of the Tribe

Mac Gander

Sep 17, 2014



Non Profit of the Month


Turning Point

Sep 14, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak


Matrix…Nine…Words…Eleven

Nanci Bern

Sep 11, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

A note from the author

Aug 26, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Two Poems,

Personal Hawaiian and Heartsong of Hawaii Nation

Jeri Rose



Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Double barreled slingshot 7

Jeri Rose

Sep 8, 2014


2014


Column

Old Lady Blog

Amazing GRACE:

Global Citizens and Artists for Social Change

Toni Ortner

Sep 4, 2014


Open Mind

"Over Forty, Over Educated, and Underemployed"

Offie Wortham

Aug 31, 2014


Old Lady Blog

OUR MAN IN BLACK

Toni Ortner

Aug 29, 2014


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Len Emery

Aug 27, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

Review by

Phil Innes

Aug 26, 2014



Vermont Diary

News

Aug 25 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

The Battle of the Somme River and the Story of Atlantis

Aug 21, 2014


Reviews Old & New

Voices Like Wind Chimes

By Arlene F. Distler

Reviewed by: Mary W. Mathias

 Poet With a Painter’s Eye

Aug 9, 2014



Write On!

Martha M Moravec

VERMONT HIPPIE ZOMBIES

Aug 5, 2014



100 Years Ago

Feature: August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014




Curious Topics

Vermont Zombie Hunting — a true story

Jul 28 2014


Articulate

Kate Anderson

Leadership

Jul 15, 2014


StudioONE

Len Emery

Goffstown Slaughterhouse

Jul 11, 2014



The Great Adventure

Terri Kneipp

Like a girl

Jul 1, 2014



Beer & Bangers

J.D McCliment’s and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Jun 30 2014



Monthly Feature

Photo Essay

William Hays,

print maker

February, 2014

 

Column in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 16, 2014


Today I had the first Open House event at Golgonooza Letter Foundry & Press since losing my partner, Dan Carr. I did not know whether anyone would make the effort to come because of the weather, and I was prepared for a small turnout, having no idea who would come. That morning, as I made homemade eggnog with the fresh glass bottled milk from local Manning Hill Farm, I tried to keep up with all that needed doing by myself, crossing off items one by one on my to do list. People arrived throughout the afternoon despite the light  but steady snowfall, and I found myself surprised by each person that crossed my threshold and felt blessed by their presence. The love and caring they brought, their open hearts waiting to be warmed, deeply touched me and opened my own heart.


The absence of one person so very much a part of this place is something I never forget; it is as if the invisible world that we cannot describe opens up—that place of feeling, which is indeed the real place we live in. Whether a loved one is here or now only within us, this depth of the experience of loss, this acute awareness of the preciousness of this life—of these people, of these moments—is a thing to value.


I had the experience a few days ago, of thinking with my brain “oh, what really is this season of the holidays?” feeling ambiguous about its meaning—as if it is really just a different season, nothing that special in actual fact—then my feelings spoke up and answered to my thinking brain—that this season is a time when we as flawed and sometimes broken humans reach out to make efforts to bring others cheer, joy, happiness and comfort (ideally) and that this effort is something—in light of the short space of time we have here on earth—where we try to be in touch with our best selves. How can that be wrong or trite at its root? The beauty of simple generosity, caring and love, are some of our best attributes when expressed with truth and honesty.


<extracts> Read More ➤

 
Column 4our

Writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Our Eyes

Matti Salminen

Dec 13, 2014


Two books are significant to my learning path right now as I sit writing this essay.  Both began with the premise that they would further my understanding of self-education.  Both serve the purpose of my writing for this column.  However, they are otherwise quite dissimilar from one another.  One is a history book while the other is a workbook for “creative recovery.”  Three weeks ago now, I began reading The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron.  While I’ve had this book for well over two years, for whatever reason, I’ve felt hesitant to immerse myself in it.

 

Learning renewed its importance in my life when I began writing—that was in the spring of 2012.  Thinking along the lines that writing would help me cultivate greater creativity, I picked up a journal, and began jotting down my thoughts.  At the time I was living in a group home…another group home.  Writing, in a short time, would become top priority in my life, and to my recovery.

Writing has opened doors to a more synchronistic life; on many occasions, when I thought I was done with writing, someone would give me just the right encouragement and I’d keep on.  These words of encouragement came from readers, often, but from other writers too.  And then the opportunity to work with a publisher, Phil Innes, came about.  At the time that I began writing for Vermont Views I was hardly a polished writer.  But I kept working at it.  Soon, another writer—who also writes for Vermont Views—took me under his wing, and introduced me to the finer points of grammar and style.

 

Getting published in Vermont Views gave me further reason to dig deeper into my understanding of my own madness.  My first column on this magazine was called My Side of Madness; it was a social commentary which targeted our broken mental health system.  I was seven months into writing for publication when I signed on to write My Side of Madness.  Not knowing how I was going to continue my writing regarding mental health without having a great deal of overlap with my first blog—I started blindly writing.  But soon, I was doing lots of research, and in all I read thirty books to keep My Side of Madness going.


Now, I’m researching self-directed learning to create a better base from which to write for this column—4our.


<extract> Read More ➤

 


Caption It




Winner

No winners for the dancing chairs




New Caption below: if you feel brilliant, send in your caption to onechess@comcast.net





New Competition


“Whatever happened to good ol’ fashioned sitting on a log?”




 

Monkey’s Cloak

Is This What Christmas is All About?




Terri Kneipp


Lights are all hung and twinkling bright.

The tree is up, what a glorious sight.

Presents are expected, as all the commercials loudly shout.

Is this what Christmas is all about?


Hints being given, wishes made known.

Catalogs open, shiny bauble shown.

Mall Santas’ knees busy…oh what a smile, what a pout!

Is this what Christmas is all about?


A child was born a long time ago,

The gift of love for the world to know.

Do we remember or truly embrace?

Is this what Christmas is all about?


Praying for a sign, a glimmer, a hope

A heart full of sadness to anything will grope.

A kind word, a simple smile, a helping hand, a gentle soul reaching out

This is what Christmas is all about!