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Across the pond: The equestrian ladies belong to a group called ‘Cornwall Heavy Horse Society’

Plus

Pictures of St Mawes, near Falmouth Cornwall where the climate is a semi-tropical zone 9, approximately the same as Northern Florida.

IMAGES COURTESY: www.cornwallcam.co.uk

Photos of the Day sponsored by:

Fine Art

&

Contemporary American Craft

106 Main St.   Brattleboro, VT 05301  

www.vtart.com    (802) 257-7044

  Passages Daily  Antonio Gramsci



Antonio Gramsci ( 22 January 1891 – 27 April 1937) was an Italian Marxist theoretician and politician. He wrote on political theory, sociology and linguistics. He was a founding member and one-time leader of the Communist Party of Italy and was imprisoned by Benito Mussolini's Fascist regime. Gramsci is best known for his theory of cultural hegemony, which describes how states use cultural institutions to maintain power in capitalist societies.


“I hate the indifferent. I believe that living means taking sides. Those who really live cannot help being a citizen and a partisan. Indifference and apathy are parasitism, perversion, not life. That is why I hate the indifferent.


The indifference is the deadweight of history. The indifference operates with great power on history. The indifference operates passively, but it operates. It is fate, that which cannot be counted on. It twists programs and ruins the best-conceived plans. It is the raw material that ruins intelligence. That what happens, the evil that weighs upon all, happens because the human mass abdicates to their will; allows laws to be promulgated that only the revolt could nullify, and leaves men that only a mutiny will be able to overthrow to achieve the power. The mass ignores because it is careless and then it seems like it is the product of fate that runs over everything and everyone: the one who consents as well as the one who dissents; the one who knew as well as the one who didn’t know; the active as well as the indifferent. Some whimper piously, others curse obscenely, but nobody, or very few ask themselves: If I had tried to impose my will, would this have happened?


I also hate the indifferent because of that: because their whimpering of eternally innocent ones annoys me. I make each one liable: how they have tackled with the task that life has given and gives them every day, what have they done, and especially, what they have not done. And I feel I have the right to be inexorable and not squander my compassion, of not sharing my tears with them.


I am a partisan, I am alive, I feel the pulse of the activity of the future city that those on my side are building is alive in their conscience. And in it, the social chain does not rest on a few; nothing of what happens in it is a matter of luck, nor the product of fate, but the intelligent work of the citizens. Nobody in it is looking from the window of the sacrifice and the drain of a few. Alive, I am a partisan. That is why I hate the ones that don’t take sides, I hate the indifferent.”

 

To This Degree


An image a day every day of the year



Today: A woman wrapped in a large stole of fox fur.


The use of intelligence and mental subtlety as a protection against storms and trials.


PROTECTIVE SHIELDING


Mar 3 2015 Pisces 14

(1° to 15° PISCES is FEDERATION in Act 4, CAPITALIZATION)

 

Make a note of it


It’s not over until the black flies sing!


 

Column  Open Mind  Offie Wortham

Why Do Some Of Our Brightest Fail In High School?





“I believe that any kid that is having a hard time with life will have trouble in school.”

                                                                  16 year old boy


There are many reasons why teenagers who have the ability and intelligence do poorly in school. This is nothing new, but will always continue to be a problem for educators and family members even as times change. I would like to focus on underachieving boys who have just entered high school, and offer a few reasons for their poor performance, and some possible solutions.


Many boys feel that high school is too hard and getting harder, as standards are raised, and pretty boring, and therefore they don't like school all that much and can't see how it is related to their future. As other parts of their young lives become more interesting, such as girls, and being cool, they may seem to develop an allergy to the high school environment, even if we knew them to be smart and good students in elementary school.

They may do enough homework to get by, but they dislike the physical experience of being in a class all day, the psychological experience of having a teacher controlling everything, the frustrations of having to sit still, and the humiliation of low grades are simply intolerable to a some students. He will need teachers who understand and can work with boys like him without taking his lack of engagement personally. Otherwise, he is going to struggle just to keep going until he graduates.


Over thirty-five percent of American boys are being raised in a home without both of their biological parents. Many have no male role model and research shows that boys from single-parent homes are statistically at risk. However, even in homes where a boy has a dad, he may not have a father who helps with homework, reads with him, or ever comes to a PTA meeting. The only time some boys see their father is when he is watching sports on TV or playing a violent video game. If these are the only thing the father cares about, well… boys aren't stupid. They are going to focus on the things that win them their father's love, respect and partnership in their own lives.


Unfortunately, the students doing poorly or the ones that are the biggest behavior problems are the ones whose teachers get the least support from the student's home. Many students refuse to do any work, even refusing to take any tests, but are still allowed to have cell phones and cars. Our culture today has washed away most childhood expectations from our society, to the point that being lazy, rude, or a jerk is considered funny by their peers, or even sometimes by their parents. While video games are often cited as the main cause of the decline in a boy's performing in school, it is the parent's responsibility to oversee how their child manages their time.


Some Suggestions to parents and guardians:—


Read This Article

 

Weather

Mar 3





from NOAA

The National Weather Service


Brattleboro:


A chance of snow, mainly after 4pm. Increasing clouds, with a high near 27. Wind chill values as low as zero. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 40%. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.


Tonight
Snow and sleet before 3am, then rain and sleet likely. Temperature rising to around 34 by 5am. South wind 9 to 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow and sleet accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.



Looking ahead:



Wednesday

A chance of rain and sleet before 9am, then a slight chance of rain between 9am and 10am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 39. West wind 8 to 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. Little or no sleet accumulation expected.


Wednesday Night
A chance of snow, mainly after 2am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 19. West wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.


Thursday
A chance of snow, mainly before 1pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 23. Calm wind becoming northwest 5 to 7 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 30%.


Thursday Night
A slight chance of snow showers before 8pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 0. Chance of precipitation is 20%.


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Art & Soul

Notes on Creating


Make a note of it




 
Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack from her title

Art & Soul

Lunch with Bill de Kooning


Winter in East Hampton can become lonely. The cold, violent ocean, white sky, and barren trees create a stark landscape. Damp, raw air chills your bones, and fog rolls in and slowly enveloped everything.  The conditions are good for working. Artists visit each other for warmth and companionship.

I went to Bill de Kooning’s for lunch today. Tom, his assistant, made delicious vegetable omelettes and I bought (at Tom’s request) a decadent-looking double-chocolate mousse cake, shaped like a bowler hat. As well as my book Audrey Flack on Painting.

Bill was very admiring of the starkly realistic technique and asked me many questions, particularly about acrylic paint, which he was interested in trying/ He remembered his days at the Academy and proudly showed me a still-life painting from that time.

There were many canvasses stacked around his cavernous, glass enclosed studio. I felt they were there for his own personal referral and contact. Old paintings are company. Seeing Bill again brought back memories of my days at the Cedar Bar, the Artists Club, and the now defunct Sagamore Cafeteria. I had cut my teeth on abstract expressionism, Bill de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, and Franz Kline were my heroes. I studied their work intensely, memorizing individual paintings. De Kooning’s Attic and Excavation greatly influenced my vision.

I focused and asked Bill if he thought one of the new works was finished. It looked thin and incomplete to me/ The canvas was painted white, on top of which were two red and blue, curved vertical stripes, looking as if they were applied in one long stroke with a four inch wide brush. There were a few other marks, but not much more. He responded, “Well, I could work on it more, it could use more work, but I think I’ll leave it and do another.”

A painting can be finished at many stages, and sometimes it is good to let a painting complete itself at an early stage of development. Abandon, freedom, and looseness are necessary at times, but not at the expense of a too-thin or incomplete painting.

When every mark an artist makes is considered significant and is sent into the marketplace, it must have an effect on the psyche and nature of the work the artist produces. I don’t believe de Kooning’s primary concern was ever money. Something else had happened to him through the years, something to have to do with both maturation and aging — aging of the eyes, the body and the mind— patience and impatience., absence of self, and of being a public figure of such renown. He was subjected to the bombardment of words, both praise and criticism, of demand for work, and of his paintings becoming an international commodity.

In the life of an artist, one can become too tight or too loose. When the pendulum swings to extremes, it wants to find its natural center.

Many abstract expressionists went too far and never came back, committing one form of suicide or another. They had painted themselves outside of their own lives and had lost their ability to return to their center.

 

Article  Monthly Feature

Got Lagoon?


[Caption: a 5-mile lagoon wall extending 1.5 miles from the shore.] The UK wants to lead the world in this new sustainable technology, which has big up-front costs, but inexpensive energy ever after. Plans to generate electricity from the world's first series of tidal lagoons have been unveiled in the UK. The six lagoons, four in Wales and one each in Somerset and Cumbria, will capture incoming and outgoing tides behind giant sea walls, and use the weight of the water to power turbines. The series of six lagoons could generate 8% of the UK's electricity for an investment of £30bn.


Contrastingly in the USA on a ‘hot demand day’ wholesale electricity prices briefly touched as high as $230 per megawatt-hour in New England, highest in the US. Interestingly New England would be a good site for a similar project but government at State and National levels are entertaining no such plans. The US Department of Energy [DOE] has a more retail focus, and together with environmental cleanups has announced such programs [Feb, 2015] as turning the Manhattan Project site into a national park. Its other focus seems to be in prosecutions, such as this report “Department of Energy Cites the University of California and Pacific Data Electric, Inc., for Worker Safety and Health Program Violations.”


'Energy dance'

The £90 figure compares favourably with the £92.50 price for power from the planned Hinkley nuclear station, especially as the lagoon is designed to last 120 years - at a much lower risk than nuclear. Mr Davey told BBC News: "I can't make a decision on this yet because discussions are ongoing. But I'm very excited by the prospect of tidal power.

"We have got some of the biggest tidal ranges in the world and it would be really useful if we could harness some of that clean energy." Read This Article

 


New

Feature

Articles


Feature

Monkey’s Cloak


DRIFTING INTO LIGHT

Julia Ferrari





Column

In Between

LIFE LOOKING BACK AT US

Julia Ferrari




Article

Monthly Feature

Got Lagoon?




Column

Vermont Diary

Poldark is coming, my ‘ansomes!

Editorial




Column

Old Lady Blog

THE BULLIES IN BLACK SUITS

Toni Ortner




Column

4our 


The Mind Watershed

Matti Salminen




Column

Open Mind


Why Do Some Of Our Brightest Fail In High School?

Offie Wortham




Feature 

Monkey’s Cloak


Passenger

Michael Cioffi





Article 

Weekly Feature

Bawdlerizing the Bible?

Noah Webster’s contribution



Column

Old Lady Blog


Dresden

Toni Ortner

Feb 16, 2015




Column

4our

Something Dead and a Glass of Red

Nanci Bern

Feb 14, 2015



Monkey’s Cloak

Love…You are


Nanci Bern




Column

O Citoyen!


Brattleboro Memorial Hospital Center for Wound Healing 

Robert Oeser

Feb 12, 2015 



Which Store Was Where on Main Street When

Martha M Moravec

Feb 11, 2014



Column

O Citoyen!


Breakfast with the new Brattleboro Chief of Police   

Robert Oeser

Feb 10, 2015



Feature

Curious Topics

The Mystery of Indian Queens



Column

Post Oil Solutions

Spirituality and Climate Change: 24 February Climate Change Café


Tim Stevenson

Feb 8, 2015




Column

4our

Profound Experience


Matti Salminen

Feb 7, 2015




Monkey’s Cloak

Influx and Stillness


Alan Rayner




Vermont Diary

Pantry liners




Column

Old Lady Blog

The Bridge


Toni Ortner

Feb 4, 2015



Feature

Retrograde

Brown girl in the ring





Column

Nurturing Nature

30 billion water bottles can all be wrong

Tasneem Tawfeek

Jan 29, 2015



Selected Letters

A Question to Persons of Color


Curtiss Reed, Jr. of Vermont Partnership responds

Jan 28, 2015



Column

Articulate

      Gander’s New Artists’ Collective Presents Two-Night Performance

to Benefit Morningside Shelter


A review by Phil Innes

Jan 26, 2015


Column

Untitled Work

Letter from

Costa Rica

Mac Gander

Jan 25, 2015



Weekly Feature

Iona Iona! Mother of Dreams






Feature

Selected Letters

Addressing racial bias in Vermont law enforcement

Curtiss Reed, Jr.

Jan 22, 2015



Curious Topics

The Pirate

Queen of Ireland





Studio TWO

Featuring




Column

Chess

Never Back Down in the King’s Gambit

Phil Innes

Jan 18, 2015




Column

4our

Creative Learning

Matti Salminen

Jan 17, 2015




Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Together


Michael Cioffi



Column

A Brief History of Natural Inclusion

Alan Rayner

Jan 13, 2015




Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

A Modern Modest Proposal  number10

Jeri Rose

Jan 11, 2015



Special Feature

“Virtually There”


The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 3 — West Penwith to The Mount



Write On!

Cantaloupe


Charles Monette

Jan 5, 2015



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak


Never Got to Say

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary


A Schorr Thing



Column

Open Mind


In What Direction Would Dr. King

Be Leading His Followers Today?

Offie Wortham

Dec 30, 2014




Special Feature

“Virtually There”

The South-West of England Coastal Path

Part 2 — West Penwith



Column

Natural Inclusivity

Estrangement and Reconciliation

The liberating and healing influence of natural inclusionality

Alan Rayner

Dec 19, 2014



Write On!

The Month of Kislev

Nanci Bern

Dec 18, 2014



Feature

Guest Article

Fog on the River

a poem inspired by an image

Terry Kneipp



Column

in between

Thankfulness in the Midst of Difficulties

Julia Ferrari

Dec 16, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Is This What Christmas is All About?

Terri Kneipp



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Secondhand Nightmare

Mac Gander




NEW Column

Consolations of History

DUSTY DEATH (Part 1)

Martha M Moravec

Dec 5, 2014



Feature

Selected Letters

Enough Whining

Paul Truong

Dec 4, 2014


Column

Articulate

The order of chaos

Kate Anderson

Dec 1, 2014



Column

4our

A Ride Through the Mist

Nanci Bern

Nov 30, 2014



Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

An Exhale of Air

(A Ferguson Poem)

Nanci Bern



Feature

Write On!

Swirlin’ shadows of the moon

Charles Monette

Nov 18, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Beyond the Horizon

Tasneem Tawfeek

Nov 17, 2014


Column

Post Oil Solutions

Protest Rally at Brattleboro TD Bank

Tim Stevenson

Nov 16, 2014


Article

Overheard

Aural, Oral,

Verbal, Spoken


Feature

Monkey’s Cloak

Late Autumn

Andrea Wallens Powell



Feature

Write On!

Words For Translation Into Any Language

Mac Gander

Nov 11, 2014



Column

4our

Rear View Mirror

Laura Momaney

Nov 10, 2014


Column

in between

“When you are in Tune with the Unknown, the Known is peaceful.”

Julia Ferrari

Nov 9, 2014




Vermont Diary

Why Shumlin Only Squeaked Through

Nov 6, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Two poems I AM and Romantics

Michael Cioffi




Monkey’s Cloak

THE GEOGRAPHY OF DESIRE

Terry Hauptman




Monkey’s Cloak

run’way

Phil Innes



Column

Untitled Work

True Story with Metaphor

Mac Gander

Oct 26, 2014



Column

4our

Upon Getting Ready for Samhain (Halloween)–Why Are There No Mirrors in Tarot Cards?

Nanci Bern

Oct 25, 2014



Studio 4

Group Photo Shoot

October 20, 2014

“Not far from

Main Street”



Real Food !

White Stew

Phil Innes

Oct 19, 2014



Real Food !

Meatballs

Mac Gander

Oct 16, 2014



Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute

Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014



Column

Energetics 

US and World Energy News

George Harvey

who is stopping us?

Sept 24, 2014





Column

Untitled Work

The Language of the Tribe

Mac Gander

Sep 17, 2014



Non Profit of the Month


Turning Point

Sep 14, 2014



Kipling’s Questionnaire

Len Emery

Aug 27, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Voices Like Wind Chimes

By Arlene F. Distler

Reviewed by: Mary W. Mathias

 Poet With a Painter’s Eye

Aug 9, 2014



100 Years Ago

Feature: August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014



Beer & Bangers

J.D McCliment’s and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Jun 30 2014

 


Which Store Was Where on Main Street When

Martha M Moravec

Feb 11, 2014


I remember a time when I thought that Brattleboro’s true strength and spirit came to light in the peaceful coexistence of three establishments now defunct but once thriving within spitting distance of each other: when Colors, the gay bar and disco, stood across the street from The Common Ground, where hippies and granola-heads ate tahini and sprouts almost directly across the street from Ransom Hastings, a rowdy “locals” bar famous for breaking out into late-night fights.


There is a Facebook page called “I Grew Up in Brattleboro” that sometimes plays the game of remember this - when it was here? And where did it go from there?


[Caption: in the 1988 photo below: where is this person going?]


Does anyone remember Dunklee's Machine Shop on Flat Street? Go in and ask for a 3/4" grade 8 bolt 6" long and old man Dunklee or his son would walk directly to the location. I was always amazed by how they knew where their inventory was.


Anyone recall the big fire that took Woolworths?.... Yup, I could see the smoke all over town from the high school ……. I thought, there goes my childhood…. That store held a lot of great memories for me. I got my first fish tank there. But mostly I remember the soda fountain shop they had, that was a real treat.


A lot of people remember that soda fountain. A lot of people remember that fire.


After the fire you could no longer see who was coming up Main Street by the reflection in the window, while sitting on the front steps of the Baptist Church. That was a real loss for some of us.

Whether it’s the hushed footfall of eleventh-century monks reporting to prayer, the first timorous sighs between Victoria and her beloved prince, the plaintive aria of a contemporary one-act opera or the clang of bolts being pulled from the drawer of a machine shop, every place still standing, every ruin we can see and all the sites we cannot see, the demolished buildings, lost graves and buried cities, contains the echoes and murmurs of lives we lived and lives we have trouble recalling and the many millions of lives we will never know but could still relate to in some fundamental human way, if given the chance. History offers that chance.


I think Cushman's was on Elliot Street. They had bicycles…...Wait, wasn't that Red Circle, with all the bikes on the main floor and the toy and hobby department downstairs?...... No, the toy store was in a building on Elliot Street. I bought lots of model antique car kits there……..Red Circle was further out Elliot, on the other side of the street…….I don't remember a toy shop but do remember a cab stand.


<extract> Read More ➤

 

Feature  Monkey’s Cloak


DRIFTING INTO LIGHT




Julia Ferrari


The mist that falls as snow, Covers the mountain,

And I see the trees drifting into light

Getting lost in the soft damp haze.

Details get erased into clouds

As if the mountain

Was sky with no end.

Only five birds

Who live in this element of air

Know how to travel in it.



       J. Ferrari  Nov 26, 2014

 Poem Copyright  Julia Ferrari, from a series of poems for an upcoming book on the transformative experience of sorrow.


Read This Article

 

Column  Old Lady Blog  Toni Ortner

THE BULLIES IN BLACK SUITS

Day Book

8/15/2014 l0 pm

New Swedish Sport



THE BULLIES IN BLACK SUITS with bill sticks to bludgeon and bloody the dolphins

ride the crest of the waves

one at the prow

cradles binoculars like a silver challis.


The team rows with steady practiced synchronicity

searing the sea

carrying the boat into depths deeper than they imagine.


What they seek cannot be obtained from man or beast.

The viewer on the computer sees a blot of red that widens into a lake but is puzzled since water is not red. There are mountains in the distance. There is a crowd on the dock waving flags and cheering. When the red widens from a lake into a sea, the killing does not stop. They have a quota.

“This is so much fun. Better than lacrosse. This is a club I am proud to be a member of,” one hunter says.


This is the 3rd extract from Toni Ortner’s forthcoming new title ‘Day Book’


Read This Article

 

Column 4our  Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern


The Mind Watershed – Matti Salminen



                    

Self-directed learning should not be solely about cramming knowledge into your brain.  Our mind is an interface stemming from our spiritual-center that allows us to explore the world we live in.  Skills are vital to making the most out of our minds.  The skills we cultivate serve as pathways for us enact our mind-source into our work, our lives, and our relationships.  Building skills for independent learning requires that you cultivate a scholarly practice.  And it is from practice that our mind/world interface is utilized—skill development assists intellectual emancipation.


Skill building not only feeds the mind but gives the independent scholar an avenue to explore ideas learned from books.  About six years ago, I decided to study chess; I bought books and subscribed to a chess magazine; I took an online chess course; and I joined my first chess club.  Each of these helped me to build thinking skills as they applied to the game.  Improving took work.  I spent at least an hour improving my game each day for many months.  Today, I am better at chess than ever before with no need to study to maintain my skills.  Chess skills did not assimilate to my natural state of being right away.  There was a time after my initial push to study chess in which my interest receded—as did my ability.


Learning persists.  After my stint at studying chess I developed skills at working on bicycles.  For two seasons, I worked on bikes almost full-time.  The learning of bike maintenance that I did at my trade school provided the necessary background for me to build skills in the workplace.  Repetition of diagnosing and resolving the mechanical failure of a great variety of bikes allowed me to yield something from the knowledge I gained at school.

Read This Article

 

Column  In Between  Julia Ferrari

LIFE LOOKING BACK AT US


 
I sit here today in the streaming sunshine, warm and well enough. The cup of green tea in my hands becomes a meditation on just being here, being present. I am amazed at the fluid layers of our lives, what each thing is tied to in memory in this current moment … the future, the past, the present, all one if we can bear to stand still long enough to experience it. A brown oak leaf on my table reaching in three directions, left, right, and ahead/behind, as a single manifestation, helps me understand this idea and I pause at its simple beauty.


   Recently I was in my print shop, working alone, as I do recently, and I was setting by hand the letters that comprised a poem. Letter by letter, space by space, the object took form and I found myself observing self within both my present mundane activity and as a person watching to see where the work was going. Could I complete this with the skill that I knew had been there when I worked in a team? I remember chewing gum with intensity to ease the stress and then recalled seeing my partner Dan Carr, when I first met him, smoking his unfiltered Camels, and I thought of how if I was a smoker, I would have been chain smoking that afternoon, as I struggled to get it right. Read This Article

 

Column  Vermont Diary  Editorial

Poldark is coming,

my ‘ansomes!


Forty Four years ago in the late 1970s a British TV program completely dominated the broadcast programming such that churches rescheduled services to avoid conflict with the program. At its peak Poldark achieved audiences of fifteen million [population of England is fifty-five million].


Set in [my native] Cornwall in the late C18th century there is the wild, romantic and elemental landscape much made use of, as well as concomitant romance — Downton Abbey it is not. About time someone at BBC thought to continue the series, which I understand will come to the USA via PBS Masterpiece in June.


Oddly, I am just reading in the same period, when John and Abigail returned to Massachusetts from England, thinking they would settle in Braintree into comfortable retirement.


A trailer for the Poldark series is here http://blogs.weta.org/tellyvisions/2015/01/22/watch-first-trailer-splashy-new-poldark-remake-here


A good cast includes Aidan Turner a brooding British officer returning to Cornwall from the American Revolutionary War in 1793, who finds his home life much changed. He discovers that his father is dead, the family mine is long since closed, his sweetheart is pledged to marry his cousin…

(Postscript, the image above is not me, but some ill-looking actor)

Read This Article

 

Please chill while some reorganization of the Home Page is taking place below.

Note demo- chilling pictures

Column  Vermont Diary  Phil Innes
Poldark is coming, my ‘ansomes!
 
Forty Four years ago in the late 1970s a British TV program completely dominated the broadcast programming such that churches rescheduled services to avoid conflict with the program. At its peak Poldark achieved audiences of fifteen million [population of England is fifty-five million]. Set in [my native] Cornwall in the late C18th century there is the wild, romantic and elemental landscape much made use of, as well as concomitant romance — Downton Abbey it is not. About time someone at BBC thought to continue the series, which I understand will come to the USA via PBS Masterpiece in June. Read This Article ➤

Column  Nurturing Nature  Tasneem Tawfeek
30 billion water bottles can all be wrong
 
I remain hopeful that actions will replace the notion that one person can make no difference. As awareness is raised, especially when it comes to the environment, the actions of every person counts and makes all the difference towards establishing a healthier planet. Brooke Medicine Eagle is quoted as saying, "There is hope if people will begin to awaken that spiritual part of them, that heartfelt knowledge that we are caretakers of this planet.” Read This Article ➤

Column  Consolations of History  Martha M Moravec
Which Store Was Where on Main Street When
 
We froze when we first heard the sound. It was like a swarm of bees, but we knew it was the planes. Fascinated, we watched them come in towards the shore in a huge inverted V like a flock of Canadian geese. Why are they coming here? Can’t they see it is the wrong target? I yelled. They must be idiots. Don’t they have maps? There are no military installations here. As they came closer in that huge impersonal V, we scurried to take shelter. Nothing like this had ever happened before.  Suddenly there was too much glass, too many windows and not enough walls. The carved wooden lattice framework over the bed had holes.  Read This Article ➤

Column  Old Lady Blog  Toni Ortner

THE BULLIES IN BLACK SUITS


Day Book, 8/15/2014 l0 pm, New Swedish Sport

THE BULLIES IN BLACK SUITS with bill sticks to bludgeon and bloody the dolphins
ride the crest of the waves
one at the prow
cradles binoculars like a silver challis.
The team rows with steady practiced synchronicity
searing the sea
carrying the boat into depths deeper than they imagine. Read This Article ➤

Column  Post Oil Solutions  Tim Stevenson
Spirituality and Climate Change: 24 February Climate Change Café
 
The Climate Change Café will host its monthly gathering on the subject of Spirituality and Climate Change: Values for a Post Oil Age, featuring the film, “Joanna Macy and the Great Turning.” Using the 26 minute Joanna Macy film as our inspiration, we will then have a discussion about the values we will need in order to successfully transition to  a sane and resilient post oil society, and how we can begin to realize these now in our everyday lives.  Read This Article ➤

Column  4our  Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern
The Mind Watershed – Matti Salminen
                     
Self-directed learning should not be solely about cramming knowledge into your brain.  Our mind is an interface stemming from our spiritual-center that allows us to explore the world we live in.  Skills are vital to making the most out of our minds.  The skills we cultivate serve as pathways for us enact our mind-source into our work, our lives, and our relationships.  Building skills for independent learning requires that you cultivate a scholarly practice.  And it is from practice that our mind/world interface is utilized—skill development assists intellectual emancipation.  Read This Article ➤

Column  Open Mind  Offie Wortham
Why Do Some Of Our Brightest Fail In High School?

 “I believe that any kid that is having a hard time with life will have trouble in school.”
                                                                  16 year old boy

There are many reasons why teenagers who have the ability and intelligence do poorly in school. This is nothing new, but will always continue to be a problem for educators and family members even as times change. I would like to focus on underachieving boys who have just entered high school, and offer a few reasons for their poor performance, and some possible solutions. Read This Article ➤

Column  In Between  Julia Ferrari
LIFE LOOKING BACK AT US
 
    Recently I was in my print shop, working alone, as I do recently, and I was setting by hand the letters that comprised a poem. Letter by letter, space by space, the object took form and I found myself observing self within both my present mundane activity and as a person watching to see where the work was going. Could I complete this with the skill that I knew had been there when I worked in a team? I remember chewing gum with intensity to ease the stress and then recalled seeing my partner Dan Carr, when I first met him, smoking his unfiltered Camels, and I thought of how if I was a smoker, I would have been chain smoking that afternoon, as I struggled to get it right. Read This Article ➤

Article  Curious Topics 
Mrs. Adams
 
It is a curious thing reading on John Adams’ second visit to Europe when his wife Abigail joined him, and where in France they both entertained Jefferson. Abigail seemed to Jefferson the complete intellectual and even political equal of her husband, and having never before met a woman ‘with a mind’ could only refer to her as ‘androgynous.’ This was not a sexual reference as much as a gender one, and a significant indicator of the life of their times that even Jefferson’s lexicon contained no words for ‘intelligent woman.’  Read This Article ➤



Article  If You Lived Here 
RIVER GALLERY BROWN BAG LUNCH SCHED 
 
All Brown Bag Lunch events take place from noon to 1 p.m. at the Robert H. Gibson River Garden, 157 Main St., Brattleboro, and are free and open to the public.

On Monday, March 9, From the early 1980s to now, Daniel Sicken has been writing songs about his experiences: non-violently resisting nuclear weapons, war taxes, and cooperation with endless war, plus courts, trials, county jails, and federal prisons. The songs, accompanied by unamplified acoustic guitar and harmonica with a fingerpicking blues style, have a personal historical component he'll happily share if requested.  Read This Article ➤


Article  Weekly Feature 
Bawdlerizing the Bible? Noah Webster’s contribution
 
Meeting. 1 Sam. 9.14. The importance of avoiding the use of words and phrases of equivocal signification must be obvious. When I was examining the proof sheets of this work, my grand daughter, fourteen years of age was reading the passage above referred to; at the words “Samuel came out against them,” she remarked that it was strange “Samuel should come out against Saul,” when they were friends. Her first impression was, that the words express enmity, as that is the most obvious signification of the phrase. I availed myself of the suggestion, and inserted the word meeting before them.

Escape and return are sometimes transitive and sometimes intransitive. Return, when transitive, admits of the passive form. “The letter was returned.” But the passive form of the verb when intransitive, is improper, as, “If she is returned to her father’s house.” Escape, though sometimes transitive, never I believe, admits the passive form. Read This Article ➤

Article  Monthly Feature 
Got Lagoon?
 
[Caption: a 5-mile lagoon wall extending 1.5 miles from the shore.] The UK wants to lead the world in this new sustainable technology, which has big up-front costs, but inexpensive energy ever after. Plans to generate electricity from the world's first series of tidal lagoons have been unveiled in the UK. The six lagoons, four in Wales and one each in Somerset and Cumbria, will capture incoming and outgoing tides behind giant sea walls, and use the weight of the water to power turbines. The series of six lagoons could generate 8% of the UK's electricity for an investment of £30bn. Read This Article ➤

Feature  Monkey’s Cloak 
DRIFTING INTO LIGHT
Julia Ferrari

The mist that falls as snow, Covers the mountain,
And I see the trees drifting into light
Getting lost in the soft damp haze.
Details get erased into clouds
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