vermont views magazine

Home page

“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Vermont Views Magazine

Home Page

Photos of the Day


Not unlike a dancer

&

Red!

Photos of the day is sponsored by

Vermont Artisan Designs

Fine Art & Contemporary American Craft

106 Main St.   Brattleboro, VT 05301  

www.vtart.com    (802) 257-7044

New Features, Articles & Columns


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


The Great Adventure

The Fairer Sex

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Returning to Place

Angel

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Guest Article

New Morning


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Returning to Place

Adam and Eve’s Lament. Etching and letterpress,

11” x 15”, 1997

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Returning to Place

Tree Trunk (Douglas fir)

Brian D. Cohen


If You Lived Here

Tour de Heifer


If You Lived Here

Stroll, technology group plan "Tech Salad"


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers

a feline alphabet

MM Kizi


Story Page

Berry’s Story

a  complete 24 frame slide show graphic story

MM Kizi


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Returning to Place

The Wood

Brian D. Cohen


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Story Page

A new graphic novel

Berry’s Story, now with 12 of 24 frames

MM Kizi


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


O Citoyen!

Meet the Selectboard candidates

Robert Oeser


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


O Citoyen!

Community survey on future fire and police buildings

Robert Oeser


Vermont Diary

Weeding out the truth about “It”


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Monkey’s Cloak

Broken Promise

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


100 Years Ago

November & December

From nude cinema to Einstein, to sinking of hospital ships in WWI


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Studio 4

Now Showing

December Works at

Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Monkey’s Cloak

Snake

D. H. Lawrence


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Post Oil Solutions

Climate Change Café Hosts Carbon Pollution Tax Presentation

Tim Stevenson


ART & SOUL

See article on this page

TIME AND THE RITUAL ACT OF ART


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Monkey’s Cloak

CARACOL OF SOULS

Terry Hauptman


World & US Energy News

Just one days news

in mid-November

George Harvey


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


If You Lived Here

Gallery at The Garden

Two new exhibits in November


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


StudioTWO

Featuring Cai Xi

November Paintings at Vermont Artisan Designs


Monkey’s Cloak

Five Haiku

Andrea Wallens Powell


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


If You Lived Here

Brattleboro Winter Farmers’ Market


O Citoyen!

Restorative Justice

Robert Oeser


Monthly Feature

Picasso sculpture at MoMA

Marnie Innes


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


100 Years Ago

Edith Louisa Cavell

Pioneering nurse executed October 1915


Weekly Feature

In conversation with Kathy Leo


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


REAL FOOD !

Tomatoes galore

Phil Innes


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay


Consolation of History

A hundred things to hide

Martha M Moravec


The Great Adventure

What will your daughters see?

Terri Kneipp


StudioOne

The Plains Indians, America’s Early Artists, at the Met

Marnie Innes






Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE


Major Sponsors


Vermont Artisan Designs

Brattleboro Food Coop

Delectable Mountain Cloth

Emerson’s Furniture

Friends of the Sun

Zephyr Designs

Neil Taylor

"The Blind Masseur"

 

In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





Vermont Diary goes Over The Mountain




We received an invitation to visit the joint libraries of some friends, two literature professors, Laura Stevenson and the late Franklin Reeve, up there above Wilmington, Saturday morning, and bring a book bag, since it was Laura’s intend to disperse some 2,500 books into the community — no charge, but no dealers, take a dozen of whatever you like.


The air was spectacularly clear and dry, best day of the year so far, and up there it was so quiet you could hear a distant peak breathing.


I acquired the following:—


Johnson’s Dictionary

A handsome book on the Hudson River painters

A Cornish romance set in Elizabethan times, and

The Badianus Manuscript (Codex Barberini, Latin 241) from the Vatican Library, being An Aztec herbal of 1552, printed in Baltimore in 1940.


I also picked up some CDs;

Jacqueline du Pre’s 5 Beethoven cello sonatas, Barenboim conducting

Vivaldi’s 6 cello sonatas, Pieter Wispelwey

A Gershwin collection, &

A 21 hour audio recording of All the King’s Men [how topical!] by Robert Penn Warren


On the way back we stopped at Hogback Mountain and I could see some 60 miles into Massachusetts clear to Wachusett Mountain, more than half way to Boston.


Read On >>



The First Lady of the World is the title of  Elizabeth Hill’s May column in Love In Action




In February 1960, Collingswood High School was graced by a visit from none other than Eleanor Roosevelt.


The arrangements had come through Mr. Palmer, who had been the custodian of the Roosevelt’s Hyde Park residence for twenty years. He was also the father of a Collingswood High School student.


At that time, Mrs. Roosevelt was known as “The First Lady of the World”, and served also as the US Ambassador to the United Nations. Not surprisingly, the whole of Collingswood was involved in making careful preparations for this auspicious occasion.


One of our School’s teachers, known affectionately as Mr. D, was chosen to be Mrs. Roosevelt’s escort. Also, New Jersey’s Governor Kean was to be on hand to do the introductions.


On that special day, the High School gymnasium was packed solid with almost 3,000 students and teachers layered up the side walls on multi-tired bleachers as well as rows and rows of folding chairs that covered the entire floor of the huge space. Excitement and noise level escalated in anticipation, as our esteemed guest was a bit late arriving.


The story that our host teacher told years later in his novelized memoir was that arrangements had been made for Mrs. Roosevelt’s personal comforts. To that end, the Women Coaches’ bathroom had been thoroughly spruced up for her with all the comforts of home. However, to everyone’s horror and embarrassment, when Mrs. Roosevelt and her British Aide were escorted to the comfort facility, the door was locked. To make matters worse, Mr. D had no key.

Read the full article.



A poem by Charles Monette,  “May I”, in Monkey’s Cloak




May I ?, Can I ?, Should I ?


opening a loving heart, I am ready to question

relaxing, trusting my intuition, my judgment

I allow information to flow thru me


May I?

do I have the appropriate permission?

does the universe give its okay?


Can I?

do I have the ability to ask?

am I ready to query?


Should I?

is it proper? is it suitable to dowse in this area?

will it be for the best good of myself and all beings?


May I ?, Can I ?, Should I ?

the answer is Yes

you may, you can, and you should


dowsing has begun

the question is asked

the pendulum begins to swing


...<extract>...



Overheard looks at HOLLOW and HOLY




Halwende. HALWE is A. Sax.: to hallow; to consecrate [by circulatory and kinetic means].


Usage is generally in common speech similar to HALANTOW [still celebrated in Cornwall] A procession which used to survey the parish bounds, singing a song with that burden, and accompanied with ceremonies somewhat similar to Furry-day. (In my youth this was called 'Rogation Sunday' by the Methodists who edged away from all this Celtic or Pagan stuff) 


There is still a Furry Day celebration in Helston, Cornwall where the citizens dance together and process in and out of the houses in a serpentine route and to a serpentine tune said to be the same one as played in 1200, but the Celtic part of it remembers Romans and Dragons! Read the entire article



Tim Stevenson addresses “Tipping Point” as the subject of his column Post Oil Solutions

  



March Madness was not simply about the NCAA basketball tournament this year. It was also about the revelations that February was the hottest month on record, that the oceans are rising faster than had previously been thought, and that our nation is leaking methane into the atmosphere in massive quantities as a result of the fracking boom.


It also included the research that showed that the West Antarctic ice sheet that is larger than Mexico and thought to be vulnerable to disintegration from a relatively small amount of global warming, and therefore capable of raising the sea level by 12 feet or more in so doing, is much closer to this disaster scenario than had been previously thought. Read On >>



Jeri Rose writes in her column  Archetypal Hippie Speaks about her voting experience in Hawaii in an article titled “How Drumpf (original family name for Trump) wins”




I went to my local library to vote. I was like all the throng there; I thought my vote counted.  I discovered that I was not registered. My partner’s name was on the list, but I, who had registered the same day as he, was not. So I had to go to another table and get a form to re-register. I handed that paper in and got a ballot. Then I went to the room where I had no idea what to do next. I walked up to a table where three people sat. They had a pile of Hillary posters in front of them. I thought it was the Hillary table. I thought there was not supposed to be a Hillary table. I asked the people at the Hillary table what I was supposed to do. They told me to mark my ballot and put it in the box. I had not noticed the box.


               I went to cast my ballot. Bernie Sanders was the choice directly above the last choice which was “Undecided”. Hillary Clinton was the first name and there were two or three other names of people I did not know were running. How had those other names gotten on the ballot? I wondered but did not ask.                              

 I walked over to the Hillary table and asked when the ballots would be counted and they said after all the voting was done and the delegates were chosen for the precincts. I asked how that was managed and they told me that they were for precinct one and the other table was for another precinct. I was surprised to realize that there were three precincts voting at this polling place and only two had tables. Again being somewhat a dumbed down sheep, I did not ask about that. Read on >>



Terri Kneipp titles her recent column in THE GREAT ADVENTURE “The Fairer Sex.”




What’s Fair about Discrimination?


Equality under the law. Justice is blind. An interesting concept, but is this true in any shape or form? Are women treated equally by our legal system, by the laws established or carried out? We are horrified at how women are regarded in “other” countries, but how about right here in the good ole’ U.S. of A.? Surely we are far superior: women can work, vote, own property, get divorced, and even run for President. However, are laws slanted against women? Lately, my blood has boiled seeing some of the glaring examples of inequality play out right before my eyes.


Let’s look at a topic that affects us all, equal pay. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 states that men and women should be given equal pay for equal work in a given establishment. As well, discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability is prohibited in Title VII, the ADEA and the ADA. But, do any of us truly believe pay inequality has been eliminated? When a woman makes 77 cents for every dollar a man makes, the facts speak for themselves. So, what did our dutifully elected officials do? Read on



Brian D. Cohen’s Returning to Place features  ‘Angel’. Etching on handmade paper, 9” x 7” (image), 12” x 9 “ (sheet), 2007




In addition to religious and devotional images among the several uses of the earliest prints made in Europe in the 15th C. were as Tarochi cards. The game of Trionfi (Triumphs) played with Tarochi cards was a sort of Renaissance allegorical “The Game of Life” with all its virtues and temptations, the cards each depicting emblems in a succession of “triumph” over the preceding image. The trump (picture) cards evolved into the 22 major arcana, representing archetypes of a path of spiritual ascension and evolution, and over the past 500 years successive artists would create new decks on that set pattern.

Read on>



REAL FOOD ! has a recipe for parsnip soup, with or without cream.




The thing is, try not to add cream. I would also recommend more than sautéing the carrots otherwise when you blend them they are more chunky than the more malleable parsnips — so blanche them additionally but separately in a little water or the chicken broth. Naturally you can triple the garlic if you wish or substitute with shallots, and a good substitute for thyme is sage. If you don't like nutmeg, substitute mace or allspice. If you REALLY want cream don't mix it in, but get the French version of sour cream [creme fraiche] and add marsala. Pour it in to the plated soup in artistic phi spirals from the back of a spoon intoning Ooo la! Ooo la la! as you do so. Read ingredients and preparation, read on



Resident Urban Naturalist Lloyd Graf begins his current column entry titled AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION with a report on the strangeness of the season,



but soon we get to newly emerging critters: Last, but far, far from least, are the rock stars of South Vermont's (and the entire region's) spring Bacchanal:   the amphibians. These unique and exquisite creatures have wriggled and hopped their ways into the hearts, not just of naturalists and conservationists, but of jewelers and artists who deal in their likenesses, puppeteers, folk singers, MacBeth-ian witches, and pretty much anyone who's ever encountered them.  Moreover, they are anatomically, physiologically and behaviorally astonishing creatures in more ways than I can begin to address here.



Julia Ferarri choses “One hundred and twenty six years” for her column title in in between




Feb 28, 2016

Tonight after a full day inside with a cold,

I did manage to walk up to the covered bridge in town and a bit beyond, and as I came back in the darkness the lights on the bridge reminded me of the image of the nineteenth century photo I found of the covered bridge as seen from the road I was walking down, one hundred and twenty six years ago. It was that photo that I chose to use when I designed the poster for my envisioned International school of Typography & Letters, exactly 3 February’s ago, the winter after my partner, Dan Carr died. In the poster, the sky above the bridge is distributed with letters like stars, falling all around … an atmosphere of potential, and the few words on it propelled out of me with a propitious vision and hope. That winter I was more alone than I’d been in forty years, alone here in this place where all my surroundings reflected the life I’d previously lived, in happiness and sorrow, making a life of printing books by hand with my partner ... Taking me from a youth who, believing in the impossible, stepped out into an unlikely journey, to a full grown “living the impossible”—life. I was one with my life and work, living the dream. Read on



Introducing a 2nd column by Brian D. Cohen View From A Bridge with and a lead article titled ‘Golgonooza.’ Photo circa 1983. Printing on a Hacker Hand Press, in Ashuelot




At the start of any visit, after 45 minutes on politics, local to national and back to local, and after admiring Bear and Mr. Clark, their two very fine and very ample cats, we would seek out unoccupied level space on which to place whatever project of mine I wanted to show Dan. It would take another ten minutes to find a clearing, usually by shoving to the side something I’d rather be looking at, a Spanish and English setting of poems by Pablo Neruda, a poem by Li Po printed from Chinese characters cast by Dan from recently discovered matrices, or one of Dan’s own poems exquisitely printed with an etching by Julia on Japanese paper as a keepsake for friends.  <extract> Read On



A complete new story is appearing by MM Kizi on Story Page 




Berry’s Story has 24 frames in the graphic novel in slide show format. Just click through or view as a slide show here.



Continuing the column 100 Years Ago with Literary Events of the year 1916. Illustrated is Margaret Mitchell




March 22 – Marriage of J. R. R. Tolkien and Edith Bratt at St. Mary Immaculate Roman Catholic Church, Warwick, England. They will serve as the inspiration for the fictional characters Beren and Lúthien. Tolkien leaves for military service in France at the beginning of June.


April–June – Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry live as neighbours to D. H. and Frieda Lawrence at Higher Tregerthen, near Zennor in Cornwall (England).  Read on




Just one day in the Energy life of the Planet is the topic of World & US Energy News written by  George harvey. There are some 20 entries, and here is one of them:




¶ Renewable energy developer SunEdison has commissioned 146 MW of Solar PV plants in the southern Indian states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Energy from the solar power plants will be sold via 25-year power purchase agreements to local distribution companies and private corporations. [PV-Tech]



A consideration of Bernie Sanders, in the light of Dr. Martin Luther King’s heritage is the topic Offie Wortham examines in his column OPEN MIND, in an article “Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”




Many of the presidential candidates, Republican and Democrat, tell their followers that if Dr. King were alive today he would be supporting them. However, it is more likely that he would be supporting only one person whose position on issues was more akin to his own. It would now not only be about civil rights for minorities, but economic rights for all Americans. This assumes that King would’ve stayed on the same trajectory he was following in 1968, as far as his activities and passions.


At the time of his death, Dr. King was planning another march for the poor. It was to be a march not just of African-Americans, but of Latinos, Native Americans, and whites, of all people in the country to march on Washington to demand fundamental changes in our national priorities. MLK would almost certainly still be considered a “race hustler” by today's right wing.  Read on>


 

Passages

Jane Goodall

Sponsored by the oldest furniture store in New England 

https://www.facebook.com/finefurniturenaturally

Hours M-F 10-5 Sat 10-4  (802) 257 7166





My mother always used to say, 'Well, if you had been born a little girl growing up in Egypt, you would go to church or go to worship Allah, but surely if those people are worshipping a God, it must be the same God' - that's what she always said. The same God with different names.


You cannot share your life with a dog, as I had done in Bournemouth, or a cat, and not know perfectly well that animals have personalities and minds and feelings.


When you meet chimps you meet individual personalities. When a baby chimp looks at you it's just like a human baby. We have a responsibility to them.


I think my message to the politicians who have within their power the ability to make change is, 'Do you really, really not care about the future of your great-grandchildren? Because if we let the world continue to be destroyed the way we are now, what's the world going to be like for your great-grandchildren?'


Chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans have been living for hundreds of thousands of years in their forest, living fantastic lives, never overpopulating, never destroying the forest. I would say that they have been in a way more successful than us as far as being in harmony with the environment.


It's been proven by quite a few studies that plants are good for our psychological development. If you green an area, the rate of crime goes down. Torture victims begin to recover when they spend time outside in a garden with flowers. So we need them, in some deep psychological sense, which I don't suppose anybody really understands yet.


There are certain characteristics that define a good chimp mother. She is patient, she is protective but she is not over-protective - that is really important. She is tolerant, but she can impose discipline. She is affectionate. She plays. And the most important of all: she is supportive.


Also see below “Notes on Photo of the Day”



Not Quite Daily

See more MM Kizi in Wondering Tales and at https://mmkizi.org


mouse on a bike



 


It could be daily, but not strictly.



Returning to Place

A weekly image and text by Brian D. Cohen


Angel

Etching on handmade paper, 9” x 7” (image), 12” x 9 “ (sheet), 2007

  




In addition to religious and devotional images among the several uses of the earliest prints made in Europe in the 15th C. were as Tarochi cards. The game of Trionfi (Triumphs) played with Tarochi cards was a sort of Renaissance allegorical “The Game of Life” with all its virtues and temptations, the cards each depicting emblems in a succession of “triumph” over the preceding image. The trump (picture) cards evolved into the 22 major arcana, representing archetypes of a path of spiritual ascension and evolution, and over the past 500 years successive artists would create new decks on that set pattern.


The Renaissance notion of cosmography, that pictures can be a simulacrum of the world and not just a representation of it, appeals to me. I am fascinated by the attempt to embrace philosophical themes through visual images and by the historic conflation of physics and metaphysics. It is a naïve or at least anachronistic view.


The Fool’s Journey is a book of twenty-three etchings of the major arcana of the traditional tarot deck (and including a title page). Modeled on Renaissance cosmography, the book is a visual portrayal of a philosophical world-view, each card presenting a universal archetype of human experience and a parallel, symbolic element or quality of the physical world. In my interpretation I took the major arcana more or less as is, inserting the four elements in place of the emperor, empress, priestess, and hierophant, who didn’t really play much role in my life, and using my own image as the Fool. The text for the book is the titles of the cards themselves. Angel is the second to last card and the apogee of spiritual ascent, while the last card, World, returns us to the place we started and discover anew.  Read more or

see more works in this series Returning to Place


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers, an Alphabet by MM Kizi


  

Here is a Complete Cat Alphabet — one image a day plus an invitation to rename the cat and also the description.


For example, for “A” I might choose Alice’s Aristocratic Air


You get the picture? To see the entire alphabet visit Wondering Tales, or is it tails?


This should take us all a month to do, and remember, dogs have owners, cats have staff!




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



Taurus 1

The Image: A clear mountain stream

Keynote: The pure uncontaminated and spontaneous expression of one’s own nature

Keyword: Its Own Nature


Taurus 2

The Image: An electrical storm

Keynote: The cosmic power able to transform all the factors of natural existence

Keyword: The Visitation


Taurus 3

The Image: Natural steps lead to a lawn of clover in bloom

Keynote: The gradual expansion of individual consciousness after a fecundating experience

Keyword: Natural fulfillment


Taurus 4

The Image: The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow

Keynote: Riches that come as result of linking the celestial and earthly nature

Keyword: Communion


Taurus 5

The Image: A widow at an open grave [Illus.]

Keynote: The impermanence of all material and social bonds

Keyword: Discard the past




Image groups comprise a 5-fold sequence

(1° to 15° TAURUS in Scene 3 ‘SUBSTANTIATION’

in Act 1 of 4, Differentiation)



Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


Minimalism

  




The work of minimalist artists, writers, and musicians was so tightly buttoned down that there was no place for their anger to go except into their lives. Edward Lucie Smith calls it “the art of the blocked drain... an art of anger.”



Notes on Photo of the Day — May 4

Jane Goodall


  


Dame Jane Morris Goodall, DBE born Valerie Jane Morris-Goodall, 3 April 1934), formerly Baroness Jane van Lawick-Goodall, is a British primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and UN Messenger of Peace. Considered to be the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees, Goodall is best known for her 55-year study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania. She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and the Roots & Shoots program, and she has worked extensively on conservation and animal welfare issues. She has served on the board of the Nonhuman Rights Project since its founding in 1996.


Among hundreds of anecdotes here is one with cartoonist Gary Larson


One of cartoonist Gary Larson's more famous Far Side cartoons shows two chimpanzees grooming. One finds a blonde human hair on the other and inquires, "Conducting a little more 'research' with that Jane Goodall tramp?" Goodall herself was in Africa at the time, and the Jane Goodall Institute thought this was in bad taste, and had their lawyers draft a letter to Larson and his distribution syndicate, in which they described the cartoon as an "atrocity." They were stymied by Goodall herself when she returned and saw the cartoon, as she stated that she found the cartoon amusing. Since then, all profits from sales of a shirt featuring this cartoon go to the Jane Goodall Institute. Goodall wrote a preface to The Far Side Gallery 5, detailing her version of the controversy, and the Institute's letter was included next to the cartoon in the complete Far Side collection. She praised Larson's creative ideas, which often compare and contrast the behaviour of humans and animals. In 1988, Larson visited Gombe.


The photo above is dated 2015.



Now, here, this!  April 19


Fed Flag Warning + Frost

  




This notice as of April 19. RED FLAG WARNING POSTED FOR CENTRAL/WESTERN MASS, SOUTHERN VT, ALL OF CT, AND SW NH THIS AFTERNOON...FROST POSSIBLE NEXT 2 NIGHTS...WE RETURN TO SEASONABLE WEATHER NEXT WEEK...


Good morning everybody, the cold front has pushed through our region after some light showers overnight, but we are quickly drying out. Behind the front, winds will gust out of the northwest up to 30mph this afternoon, and given how dry it is, a Red Flag Warning has been posted for the entire region. Outdoor burning or fires of any kind are discouraged today.

Highs will reach into the low to mid 60s today, and even though it's mostly cloudy now, partly sunny skies will develop with time. A secondary cold front moves through tonight and clears us completely out, with lows near 30 degrees.


As high pressure builds in tomorrow, we repeat the same high and low temps as we'll experience today, though calmer winds are expected.

Thursday will be the peak of the warmth for the next 7 days, most likely, with highs in the mid 70s and plenty of sunshine.

By Thursday, a shortwave will be diving southeast out of Canada and will attempt to merge with an upper level low pushing east through the Great Lakes.


This should allow for showers to break out in the pre-dawn hours of Friday morning, through Friday itself, with highs in the low 70s. Some downpours are possible.


Behind this cold front, we'll cool down to seasonable levels well into the next week. Highs this weekend should fall on either side of 60 degrees with partly sunny skies.


Next week we should remain in the 50s, and more showery weather could enter the region.