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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Contributors To Vermont Views Magazine


Alex Gyori


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Photograph by Vermont Views

This page is sponsored by Neil Taylor "The Blind Masseur"


Special Feature

DROLL OF THE MEREMAID



Hundreds of years ago, there lived somewhere near the Lizard Point a man called Lutey or Luty, who farmed a few acres of ground near the seashore, and followed fishing and smuggling as well, when it suited the time. One summer's evening, seeing from the cliff, where he had just finished his day's work of cutting turf, that the tide was far out, he sauntered down over the sands, near his dwelling, in search of any wreck which might have been cast ashore by the flood; at the same time he was cursing the bad luck, and murmuring because a god-send worth securing hadn't been sent to the Lizard cliffs for a long while.


Finding nothing on the sands worth picking up, Lutey turned to go home, when he heard a plaintive sound, like the wailing of a woman or the crying of a child, which seemed to come from seaward; going in the direction of the cry, he came near some rocks which were covered by the sea at high water, but now, about half ebb and being spring tides, the waves were a furlong or more distant from them. Passing round to the seaward side of these rocks, he saw what appeared to him a fairer woman than he had ever beheld before. As yet, he perceived little more than her head and shoulders, because all the lower part of her figure was hidden by the ore-weed which grew out from the rocks, and spread around the fair one in the pullan (pool) of sea-water that yet remained in a hollow at the foot of the rocks. Her golden-coloured hair, falling over her shoulders and floating on the water, shone like the sunbeams on the sea. The little he saw of her skin showed that it was smooth and clear as a polished shell. As the comely creature, still making a mournful wail, looked intently on the distant and ebbing sea, Lutey remained some minutes, admiring her unperceived. He longed to assuage her grief, but, not knowing how to comfort her, and afraid of frightening her into fits by coming too suddenly on her, he coughed and ahem’d to call her attention before he approached any nearer.


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Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Eugene Uman



Phil: Good acoustics in this room according to this recorder.


Eugene: This room is built for sound. We can get 150 people in here pretty comfortably, over 200 if they’re squeezed in.  The size of the space is about 2,000 square feet, it’s a great room. We put up behind the curtains there, carpeting, behind these and those wall hangings, and the stage also has heavy carpeting, and what we’ve done is reduce the liveness of the room until it sounds really good, to just the right amount so that things sound live but not overbearingly so.


Phil: How long have you been in this space?


Eugene: About 14 years.


Phil: And the space is at Cotton Mill Hill, with huge old wooden floors and high ceilings in a brick building which used to be a … [laughter]


Eugene: Right, a cotton mill, then the Dunham’s shoe factory, and some of these markings on the floor come from old machinery. This building has seen a lot of action. I remember when my wife and I were looking for space for the Vermont Jazz Center, we looked at a lot of spaces around town, and were thinking of buying a house, building an extension to it, and then we found this space. It was smaller at first, but we thought, this is it! One of those spaces that you walk in and you know it’s right. Very high ceilings, good sound quality, aesthetically pleasing.


Phil: When you say you were looking for a place does that mean you were moving here and looking for a place to start up?


Eugene: The thing is that Attila Zoller started this place, a magnificent guitarist from Hungary, and he started it 36 years ago. This place(the jazz center) has a venerable history; Zoller is a very famous person in the world of jazz. He had a place up in Newfane but most of his time was spent in Queens, New York City, where he had an apartment.  He was originally from Hungary and fled, on foot to Austria in 1948 after the Russian occupation.  He kicked around Europe for a while and then he moved to the United States in 1959 due to invitations from Lee Konitz and Oscar Pettiford, and partly to play with Benny Goodman…


Phil: Oh yeah?!


Eugene: Yeah! And partly because he received a scholarship to attend a school called the Lenox School, one of the first jazz schools to ever exist (in the late 50s).   He apparently roomed with the great saxophonist Ornette Coleman, but he himself was highly regarded at the time.  He has now passed on. He asked me to take over the the Vermont Jazz Center before it had an actual physical location. It existed as a non-profit that presented concerts and workshops in different locations.  For example, they did a summer workshop at Marlboro college one year, and did it at the Putney school another year, and they would hold concerts at let’s say the West Village Meeting House, or at the Mole’s Eye. [laughter] All over the place and when he asked me to take over as what he called executive director I was moving here with different ambitions because I didn’t have the kind of recording career that he had — I wanted it to be more focused on education, and he had the Summer workshops but I wanted education to be a year-round program.  We needed a location and I also wanted to host concerts here, so that’s the reason we looked around and we are now here in this space.

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Publisher’s Challenge

Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here

Selected responses will appear in this column.




Challenge #5

Aug 10, 2014


Fantasy Island



In 750 words or less write a short story about being marooned on this tidal island during a storm. You and a small group of strangers have to spend the night on St. Michael’s Mount, Cornwall...


Old


or by an older name, the Roman ‘Ictis.’ In recent history the island It was a site of a monastery in the 8th – early 11th centuries and Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman abbey of Mont Saint-Michel. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien houses by Henry V, when it was given to the abbess and Convent of Syon at Isleworth, Middlesex. It was a resort of pilgrims, whose devotions were encouraged by an indulgence granted by Pope Gregory in the 11th century.


Even Older


Its Cornish language name – literally, "the grey rock in the wood" — may represent a folk memory of a time before Mount's Bay was flooded. Certainly, the Cornish name would be an accurate description of the Mount set in woodland. Remains of trees have been seen at low tides following storms on the beach at Perranuthnoe, but radiocarbon dating established the submerging of the hazel wood at about 1700 BC. The chronicler John of Worcester relates under the year 1099 that St. Michael's Mount was located five or six miles (10 km) from the sea, enclosed in a thick wood, but that on the third day of November the sea overflowed the land, destroying many towns and drowning many people as well as innumerable oxen and sheep; the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records under the date 11 November 1099, "The sea-flood sprung up to such a height, and did so much harm, as no man remembered that it ever did before"



View Contributions to this

and other Challenges


Guest Article


An excerpt from the forthcoming title:

Magnificent Obesity: My Search for Wellness, Voice and Meaning in the Second Half of Life,

published August 26 from Hatherleigh Press/Random House.


Martha M Moravec


When the shock of a heart attack at age 55 accelerates my midlife crisis into a nightmare of phobias and panic attacks, my doctor suggests that I ask my friends to organize themselves into a support team to help me through the trauma. Sadly, it occurs to me that with the exception of one best friend, I have lost touch with all the friends and social groups I had relied upon during my 35 years in Brattleboro.


So you see, there had always been a gang. But not at this time, not now. Entire casts of friends, acquaintances, and extras had disbanded; I had moved on or they had moved on; we had separated as a matter of course or blithely drifted apart. At the time of my heart attack, after a year and a half of unemployment and mostly solitary writing, I was working at another nonprofit, mission-driven organization with a wide array of services and programs but only two staff: the executive director and me.


My solution was to try rounding up one of the old gangs, members of the bar crowd from 30 years before who still lived in the area, people I occasionally ran into on the street and occasionally celebrated birthdays with, all women, some younger than me, some older, some married, some not.


I called the elder, the one we might consider the leader of the pack, whose thriving pub on Main Street had supplied us with employment and a stomping ground as bartenders, waitresses, and cooks. When I asked her to put out the word about my situation and perhaps organize a lineup of gatherings and good times, I should have sensed trouble in her hesitation and slight befuddlement. I did not, however, because I was having a vision of something so natural I assumed that everyone would spontaneously and joyously share it.


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Non Profit of the Month

Turning Point


People passing through downtown Brattleboro the last few months have been captivated by the bustle of construction activity and excavation at the corner of Elm and Flat streets. The Turning Point recovery center is restoring the 39 Elm Street property, severely damaged in Tropical Storm Irene, to use as our new permanent facility for serving our local recovery community. This restored and renovated building will give us a downtown home again, we hope before the year is out. This relocation brings us back closer to the community of people we serve. We love the idea that this building will experience a renaissance of its own while center guests enjoy their own personal recoveries from addictions. Our new home also brings us full circle, back to Elm Street where our story began more than seven years ago.


Our volunteer-led center has served this community since late 2006 as one of eleven linked yet independent recovery centers in Vermont, affiliated through the Vermont Recovery Network. Some guests go through treatment programs, and some have histories with the correctional system due to their addictions. Others find recovery through 12-step and other supportive, spiritual programs. Last year, guests made about 7,690 visits to our Center. About 6,550 were drop-in guests seeking peer support or a sober environment; about 1,140 attended 12-step and other mutual support groups. Attendance in programming has steadily increased as we have added services, although our visits dropped significantly after leaving our downtown location.


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Vermont Diary

Strange brew




Can there be anything funnier and simultaneously more inane than the heads of state of former British colonies pronouncing negatively on a current colony’s right to govern itself? President Obama has weighed in with his ‘not a good idea’ on behalf of the United States and for all the reasons the Royalists at the time were proposing in 1777, that the colonies should knuckle under to the stamp tax — citing economic woes ahead for any independence, and besides, aren’t we all friends?


NPR today picked an academic with personal connections with Scotland several generations ago, who was born in Canada now lives in the US, to interview and what he came up with was sentimental — just because the English are a bit heavy handed these past 300 years, was his theme, that’s no reason…


But it was for India, Australia and the 13 colonies in 1775. So if Scots want out of this Union why are so many ex-colonial people so interested in keeping them in it, all chanting, as it were, ‘for their own good?’


Two interesting things have happened during the secessionist escapade; that England has granted Scotland a broad range of powers if it stays in the Union, and these have backfired since any reasonable person would ask why Scotland didn’t possess this broad range before — Where was this equitable arrangement the past 300 years?


And the second thing is that in Scotland 16 and 17 year olds will be allowed to vote — the thinking behind this is that it will be their own future they are deciding, and this is real equity in the culture — and this commits the future of the country to these young folk to struggle and to make it, entirely reminiscent of the 13 colonies in 1777, and the natural right of countries to determine their own fate.


This strange brew of factors is as strange as scotch — the brew that Scotland made when the resident English declared that Scots were not good enough to drink wine.


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Monthly Feature


William Hays, print maker


A visit with William Hays in his studio in Brattleboro. To accompany this article the current print he is working on now appears in a 7 stage slide show at Studio 3, click the link and press ‘play slideshow’.


I had previously interviewed the subject for an hour on January 21, 2011 almost exactly 3 years ago. Readers might like to read the transcript here. Then we progressed from art to the universe and all that.


This time we conspired to be more disciplined and attempt to illustrate a print in progress and something of the nature of the art.


Where better to start than with the inks themselves? An immediate question I had was if the materials the artist used were generally the same as had Gutenberg (c. 1395 – February 3, 1468)? And they were. Stand oil, I discovered, is a base for the ink made from linseed oil thickened by heating in an oxygen deprived chamber, and linseed comes from flax and is a good drying oil for a process known as polymerizing.

Extracts Read More ➤


Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute


Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014


I first met Pete Seeger when I moved to Beacon, NY in 1999. On the first Friday of every month he held a meeting at his Sloop Club in Beacon. The Sloop Club was an offshoot of the Clearwater, which Pete had formed to clean up the pollution in the Hudson River. I made up my mind to meet Pete, and within a year I was the treasurer of the Sloop Club and even lived with my family in Pete’s original small house right next to his home at the top of a private mountain.

I enjoyed accompanying him on the train, or driving him to visits to his doctor in Manhattan or to visit friends. It was amazing to see the crowds of people that gravitated to him in Grand Central Station, or walking down the street wherever we went.

Pete was so humble and kind to everyone he met, inviting some of us to Thanksgiving Dinner with his family. Mickey and I spent weekends with Pete and Toshie and their daughter Tinya. The guest room was on the top floor of the barn that Pete had built himself. It was crowded with boxes of letters, instruments, awards and photographs which were eventually heading to the Smithsonian. There were instructions written on the walls of the bathroom in magic marker on how to flush the toilet and turn on the shower. Mickey was horrified when Pete showed us to the small room, and then expected us to sit down and sing with him. He introduced us to a new song, “God’s counting on You”, and the three of us sang the 8 verses together for the next hour. 

It is still difficult to comprehend that Pete and Toshie are no longer physically with us. Their partnership, their vision for a just and clean planet, and his music and her drive, affected the world for the better, and we will never forget them.


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Monkey’s Cloak


The slightest notice

Charles Monette

                             


Consider slanders, shoulder slights

Utter rants and slobber away my little sleepy head

Indeed be fond enough to detest freethinkers

Their worthless, although occasionally earnest beliefs


Be content, don’t let bickering create a desert round your heart

Beware the confidence man’s sad regrets meant to confuse you

A quarrel, an isolated row, goes by without the slightest notice

Tolerate the intolerable, spare further trouble


Let me have my say

Never doubt your way

Truly stand up and take account of your actions

Reproach the obstinate for the sake of appearances


Count yourself fortunate whenever questions alter your mood

Follow your enemy calmly, decisively and humanely

Behave sensitively, surely sincerely… belittle sympathy

Absolutely refuse censoring, attach importance for instance


Certainly something apart, perhaps between, or even amiss

Naturally goodness flies on a whim despite the fix

Delivering far flung affairs of little importance

Astonishing remedies fling systematically to the winds


Offer apologies for nothing

For reasons usually kept quiet, shout to the mountaintop

Perfectly acquired morality, recently rumbling aside

Casts a dry formal style often thwarted by salty language


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Column Untitled Work


The Language of the Tribe

Mac Gander

Sep 17, 2014


We watch a video-clip in which Marshall McLuhan explains to a group of college students that they are faced with the choice between civilization and literacy, or tribalism and what he calls “rock.” It is something like 1968 or 1970 in the clip, and in my classroom, 2014, we are talking about the third revolution in writing language, the digital age, and how it relates to the first and second revolutions.


The students do not know what McLuhan means by “rock.” They know it is a word for a kind of music, although they have a much more nuanced vocabulary for music now than existed in the 1960s, when rock is what it was. I play a live version of Jimi Hendrix’s “Machine Gun.”  I think that this song is what McLuhan means when he talks about tribalism vs. civilization and literacy vs. rock.


My students like it a lot when I play clips like this. It is like a bridge between them and me, me a neo-Luddite, my head filled with words and books, and they with their images and sounds, the acoustic world (as McLuhan termed it) in which they have grown up as natives. It is fun for them to imagine that even though I am making them read bits of Homer and understand Walter J. Ong’s concept of primary orality, I was once like them, grooving to Jimi in a dorm room filled with smoke.


Then I explain how in 1969 there are two discourses regarding Vietnam, the discourse of the editorial pages of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal, and the discourse of Jimi Hendrix’s “Machine Gun,” and that in McLuhan’s view one of these discourses is literate, visual, and civilized, and the second is acoustic and tribal. It’s starting to make sense to all of us—including me, it’s a new course and while I put it together I’m still learning as we go. What we’re really focused on is Socrates’ indictment of writing in Plato’s Phaedrus, where he tells the Egyptian myth of Thoth.  Thoth brings a number of wondrous new things to the Pharaoh, including the invention of the written word, but the Pharaoh (and Socrates) reject writing because it will destroy the capacity of memory, replacing it with mere reminiscence, and also substitute empty knowledge for wisdom, and tiresome discourse for original thought.


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Column 4our

Writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Meandering knows no mean

Charles Monette

Sep 30, 2014

                     


Another 4Our is calling, come on…. your turn to churn in.  So, I’ll walk you through two labyrinths, one left, one right in between.


New joy discovered in Newport, New Hampshire, back of a Kelley yard, a labyrinth so enchanting. It brought awe and a morning nod.  Granite gates and portals abounded, Buddha surrounded every tree and my shoes came off, then alpaca socks in gracious harmony.


I was with new friends who made it even better, so I followed their lead to the center.  Along the way, the meander, green moss swallowed feet down somewhere.  A cushioning carpet of green, cool wet with dew lightened my dance, dropping weightlessly.  Smiles were easy as talk while we looked to see. 


Close to the Equinox, summer’s change into fall, I keep coming back to easy as I try my best to recall.  So, Wayne counsels to bring in new vision on a turn by a sycamore tree, and the light lightens, begins to set you free.


So all this might read non-earthshaking a walk round a bonsai tree, but it was simply captivating, engaging my feet and me.  The stones circled round as they do in the granite state.  Live free, then die, a hope for humanity. 


Yet, I was truly alightened, another new word by me, like beable, red-underlined google-wronged like a teacher’s remark used to be.


All changed this morning, as it is often wont to do.  Back in Vermont, just a jaunt in Jerry’s, yard a morning ritual that’s become habitual.  Alone here, with the quiet now. 


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Pilgrimage — Part 1:

Len Emery

Sep 1, 2014

                                                                        


I have lived adjacent to or very near the Atlantic Ocean and its estuaries most of my life. I have been fortunate enough to be able to spend some of that life enjoying the bounty and occasionally the fury of that ocean. Throughout those years I've been able to photograph and more often simply watch the ocean and lately have been able to travel back to the ocean from my home in southeastern Vermont. This series of short essays each with an accompanying photo I hope will give some insight into my enjoyment and respect for the ocean, its moods, its bounty and the men and women that live nearby. I have taken my short working vacations in Machias Maine for the last two years and have made it my base of operations. I chose Machias for its central location and close proximity to the various fishing villages along this vast and sparsely populated coast. I have been privileged to talk with and photograph the fishermen of this region.



I begin this adventure with a short drive along US Rt. 1 then join Maine Rt. 187 in Jonesboro for my short ride to the harbor of Jonesport but first a definition:


"reach (oceanic): An arm of the sea extending up into the land"



As you turn off US 1 and onto Rt. 187 the narrow road begins its slow decent toward the ocean. The day is gray and sullen not at all a vacation day as one would like it to be. Through low rolling hills, scrub pine and birches and vast fields of wild blueberries the road winds along. Occasionally there is a small settlement, not quite a town not quite a village but a settlement. As you pass through each settlement there are large stacks of small cages of wire mesh and netting, boats of all sizes in various states of repair and brightly colored Styro-foam floats with numbers painted on them skewered on wooden pikes. And still the road descends toward the sea with brief glimpses of Englishman Bay and an occasional rain shower.


Suddenly you come up over a rise and there it is, the settlement of Peasly Corner. There area few dozen houses scattered around on a low hillside here. One or two long forgotten farms, some small cottages and homesteads and an out of place retirement villa. There's a small kiosk erected by an optimistic blueberry picker with a cooler of berries and a coffee can, "blueberries $3" it proclaims. Peasly Corner disappears behind me as quickly as it had appeared.


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Column Articulate

Leadership

Kate Anderson

Jul 15, 2014

      

I tend to think leadership asks us to be willing (though it's not prescribed) to also take on the fool's role.  By that I mean Hamlet as fool.   Push, confront, place it out there, demand evidence of some good grappling with the grand what ifs.   Failure?  Yes, and of course, to be expected. 


Let things be muddied and watch the joy and vigor by which they sort themselves.  

An arts district.  A name is a rose,  is a rose.  It is wise to call the question, is it important, useful, good to designate such such, that which is.  Are we to petition the State for formal designation of an Arts District, a Cultural District?  Brattleboro is that already.  And an arts campus, and a de facto arts colony.   Or, it can be that we are no more an arts town than a sports town or a retail haven.


What  does matter is for us to see how we function.  Take  the engine apart.  Look at all the pieces. Tinker.   How do they work with one another.  Oops ?? Did we just innovate to another compound?   Ah yes, and now we have Worpsewede, Bloomsbury.   And we can call on a fertile fertile field.   And we might name it, too. It doesn't matter.  The field yields its own harvest


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This column is sponsored by Friends of the Sun


Column Open Mind

Recommendations for Controlling Lobbying

In the

Vermont Legislature

Offie Wortham

Sep 29, 2014


1.Require former legislators must wait a year before lobbying their ex-colleagues.

2.Deprive lawmakers-turned-lobbyists of privileges such as unfettered access to otherwise "members only" areas such as the House and Senate floors and the House gym.

3.One year ban on government employees from lobbying on issues they had worked on.

4.All qualified candidates should have access to public funding –at the very least they could spend more time on the issues and less time dialing for dollars.

5.The Office of the Vermont Secretary of State should expand the present website that displays every piece of legislation that is introduced to become a de facto online forum and clearinghouse, accessible to the general public, for purposes of transparency and accountability. This will be a forum for lobbyists, constituents, and other interested parties to come together to publicly and debate legislation, and in the process provide congressional staff, journalists, and the public access to the best available arguments, information, and ideas about public policy in a way that is easily searchable and sortable. Separate pages would exist for each bill introduced. Some pieces of legislation are incredibly complex, and may require multiple sub-pages for separate titles, sections, and amendments.

6.The Vermont Secretary of State will hire innovative thinkers and programmers to help develop and guide the architecture of these sites as they evolve. (Existing online forums such as Wikipedia, Yelp, and Reddit have all developed innovative mechanisms to usefully aggregate information and could serve as models.)

7.The system must allow individuals to update their comments as new information becomes available, and it has adequate functionality to aggregate, sort, and dis-aggregate comments based on who is writing and what they are saying.

8.Registered lobbyists will be required to first briefly state their client organization’s position on the bill (or amendment or section of the bill), and if they wish, to provide a simple aye-or-nay recommendation.

9.In order for this process to be effective, it must become the required conduit for lobbying.

10.Lobbyists have to file quarterly reports listing their clients, issues, and institutional targets and compensation?


Conclusion:—


The public and other interested parties will now be able to see who is advocating for what, what their arguments are, and what information they are basing those arguments on. Rather than endless reporting speculating about who is saying what behind closed doors and how special interests are twisting arms, this could shift public debate more to the actual arguments by making those actual arguments and facts more easily accessible and comparable. Public interest groups who can’t afford to hire enough lobbyists to schedule multiple meetings with every office will now have a more level playing field on which to compete. They also will be able to see what corporations are arguing, and will more easily be able to respond to these allegations. Likewise, corporations can respond to any unfounded allegations their critics might be spouting.

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Fall

Tasneem Tawfeek

Sep 20, 2014




For so many parents, teachers, and students, the month of September marks the official start to the academic year. For some, it is a dreaded time...after all, it also marks the end of summer vacations and time spent relaxing. It marks the temporary end of serene moments on the lake or relaxing by the ocean side while witnessing yet another one of nature's beauties. For others, it can also be a bittersweet moment of time. Yes, another fun-filled summer might be over but returning to a sense of routine is almost welcomed and invited. In addition, the change of seasons becomes something to look forward to, and although the beauty of summer ends in this month, we all know that the autumn season lies ahead of us. We might miss the sounds of waves crashing, yet we also look forward to the splendor that accompanies yet another season. We trade sun-filled days for cool, gentle breezes. We trade lemonade for apple cider, and we trade those walks on the beach for telling camp stories around a cozy fire. Most of all, we trade those picture perfect views consisting of lush, green forests for another type of serenity...the serenity that hides behind almost every color of the rainbow during the autumn season. Every year, that fall foliage that nurtures us so greatly stands before us as another reminder that nature serves to soothe us more than we realize. Unfortunately, what remains the same throughout each season is the reality that we need to be more actively engaged in ensuring that we are doing our part in nurturing the very nature that we rely on in our everyday lives. When it comes to the beauty of fall foliage, I can't help but to think of the bigger picture. Take global warming as an example. Is it possible that an environmental concern such as global warming could have a direct impact on the stunning array of colors that we look forward to each autumn? According to environmental experts, the answer is yes.

The fact that our planet is becoming warmer, and that human activity has pretty much caused it, has prompted many scientists to take a closer look at the impact of global warming on our health, economy, and environment. Through the act of burning fossil fuels, greenhouse gases are added to the atmosphere, thereby trapping heat which results in a steady rise in the temperature of our planet. The effects of this are constantly being discussed, reported, and brought to our attention. Heat waves, air pollution, wildfires, rising sea levels, flooding, respiratory health...all of these topics have been studied in detail and are causes for concern. It is only in recent years in which scientists have added yet another impact of global warming to this list and have made the link when it comes to global warming and fall foliage. With warmer temperatures on the rise, the autumn season becomes shortened and leaves continue to maintain heat. Typically, leaves change color when their production of chlorophyll decreases as the days get shorter every year. This whole process is dependent on temperature and levels of moisture, and with global warming now becoming a factor in autumn, the production of chlorophyll becomes prolonged in the leaves. This means the process of leaves changing their colors will ultimately happen later and later each year. This, in turn, brings cause for concern as it can introduce invasive species to a particular area and it can directly impact the economy since many states rely on the revenue brought in by tourism during the fall months.

So, as another start to the academic year rolls around, what practical measures can we take to do our part?

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The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014

                                                                        

Avid readers find themselves drawn to a book even though they are not familiar with the writer’s work or subject matter. Oddly enough, insights gleaned from that book relate precisely to the reader’s current circumstance and or/ questions. The brain works by physical connections. Memory works by connection.  People work by connection too. We are not isolated from others. Writers, painters, biologists, physicists arrive at similar theories although they have no connection with one another’s work and reside at opposite sides of the earth. We are all moving to a higher level of consciousness and if a piece of new information facilitates that process, it is vital to convey it to others even if they do not wish to hear it or accept it.


Dr.Rollo May, the famous psychoanalyst, in his book titled The Courage to Create points out that innovative creative thinkers have always been a threat to established society because the new ideas they champion destroy the structure and conventions of the established society. Picasso is quoted as having said that” to create means first to destroy.” We cannot forget those who have been crucified for ideas that challenged the norms of their times. The list is endless.  Although the individual is burnt at the stake or crucified, the idea he/she proposed, the vision remains intact and blooms like a flower over centuries.  Apes do not have a Jesus Christ or Joan of Arc.


Dr.Rollo May was fascinated with the creative process and the work produced through the fusion of the conscious and unconscious. He speaks of the “heightened consciousness” experienced when one is immersed in the act of creation: the feeling of floating suspended in time, the lack of appetite, the increase of heartbeat, the intense concentration, the sheer joy as if one were flying; indeed, one is released temporarily from our conception of time and space that Einstein regarded as illusion or our way of coping with our short life span by dividing time into past, present, and future. We cannot travel at the speed of light while here in our bodies on earth, but the artist and writer in the act of creation feels he/ she moves at the speed of light. Everything that has been muddied or dim is suddenly clarified and abnormally vivid: long buried memoires surface as if they are occurring now. Ideas that seemed vastly different form solid rational connections.


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Column in between

Julia Ferrari

May 27, 2014



Every time I begin to feel lost or overwhelmed, I take a moment to slow down and look outside of myself to see other lives around me and to reflect on how each of our lives comes together, despite problems, to allow us choices— to live this life to reach our potential & meet our challenges. I believe each of us carries with us a direction, with lessons to learn and fires to light within ourselves. Many paths stretch out in front of us as we start our lives, some are painful and others are fulfilling but they each can bring us closer to our interior life. We don’t always take those forays into the unknown, those roads we can’t see the end of, because what we don’t know can scare us, and fear can be a strong entangler … However, through paying attention to our intuition, that inner voice that nudges us in certain directions (if we listen close enough) we can catch a glimpse of a possibility that is not mapped out.


For me, art was one of the first interests I followed as a youth, despite being discouraged by a kindergarten teacher for not measuring up, and it continued to press at me at the edges of my life. I remember being twenty-four and not knowing what I wanted to do as a career, there were so many possibilities and no clear path to my identity, it seemed. Painting, calligraphy, and poetry became threads that started to be woven. Then, while living in Boston, I responded to an ad in the “Real Paper” involving letterpress and the small press movement, and that began, most unexpectedly the direction of my life.

Within the context of the hand printed books I was encountering, printmaking began to interest me, but then one day I saw a title page—as a shape, not just as information, and the world of typographic design opened up in front of me.


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Column Beer & Bangers

On the Road: A Visit to J.D McCliment’s Pub and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Terri Kneipp

Jun 30, 2014


The Beer & Bangers crew has been adventurous venturing far from their usual confines of the Big B into such foreign territory as Putney and Chester, VT.  The crew chooses locations based on the possibilities of either a good selection of brews and grub from past personal experience, word of mouth or sheer luck of stumbling upon an establishment. Not all who participate enjoy beer, so other beverages are explored including wine, cocktails and good ole ice tea being a connoisseur of the latter myself still learning the finer nuances of the heartier brews.


J.D. McCliment’s Pub (http://www.jdmcclimentspub.com/) in Putney is well established with a steady stream of customers, both local and visitors. Along with a casual, indoor dining area with a pool table upstairs, weather permitting there is an inviting outdoor deck. The beer selection was minimal with mostly bottled domestic beers with a Shale being one exception which was excellent. Ice tea was freshly brewed and decent, nothing exciting but fine. Now, the meat of the meal, so to speak, received mixed reviews. The Turkey Burger was thought good with the Ruben being perfectly acceptable. After that there was debate, one member thought the Fish and Chips fine, while one indicated the fish was over cooked. The Bratwurst was passable, but would not be had again with the Corned Beef being too salty. Overall the atmosphere was pleasant with adequate service, albeit slow which seems to be the rule in local pubs rather than the exception. The crew agreed they might to go back to enjoy an evening outside with lively conversation and a beverage of choice where food wasn’t the focus but accessible. It was noted that an authentic Scottish pub it was not; for that, one need only head to Chester.


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The double barreled slingshot 7

Jeri Rose

Sep 8, 2014


Really? Bra straps distract males, then the next fashion statement is the Burqa because that is the battle cry, or brattle cry of the notion that women must defer to male uncontrollable lust. I have always wondered at the availability that skirts provide for male entrance and yet often women are prevented from wearing pants. Growing up in the cold North East, I had to wear leggings under my required skirts to keep warm. As for men making the rules about female adolescent attire, that signals to me that there is still a preponderance of males in positions of authority in the Brattleboro school system. However, I would not be sanguine that were women the deciding factor about this bra strap fiasco that the perception about these strips of cloth would result in a sane response. I would like to ask the prurient among you whether you think you have a right to demand that females wear the double barreled slingshot? I recall that a young high school man was expelled because his face sprouted hair that the school required him to shave. I suppose you could also demand that young women bind up their breasts requiring them to only protrude a given amount. There are so many insane responses from adults toward the young possible due to the abuse of the prurient imagination merged with the controlling authoritarian impulse of the powerful.


          Might I modestly suggest that adults realize that children grow away from parents to become themselves. Give them a basis in morality that you yourselves reflect and having done your job, trust that they will not harm others and have the awareness of self preservation that is necessary to get them passed teen-hood to become members of society that might astonish and yet will be acceptable if you will just get over your fear of having them be odd. In fact, were you to be an adult, you might have gotten over that adolescent fear of being different that now manifests in some still cleaving to notions of “what the neighbors will say”.


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Column Chess

Math and Chess for America’s Schools

Columnist: Phil Innes

Aug 23, 2014


A letter addressed to Lady Michelle Obama, by Rob Mitchell, Murfreesboro, TN, cited a Canadian report:


Case Studies

 

As reported in Developing Critical Thinking Through Chess, Dr. Robert Ferguson tested students from seventh to ninth grades from the years 1979-1983 as part of the ESEA Title IV-C Explore Program. He found that non-chess students increased their critical thinking skills an average of 4.6% annually, while students who were members of a chess club improved their analytical skills an average of 17.3% annually. Three separate tests to determine how chess affects creative thinking were also done as part of the same study. It concluded that on average, different aspects of creative thinking had improved at a rate two to three times faster for chess playing students, as opposed to their non-chess playing counterparts.

Subsequent studies by Dr. Ferguson further supported these original conclusions. In the Tri-State Area School Pilot Study conducted in 1986 and Development of Reasoning and Memory Through Chess (1987-88) chess-playing students showed more rapid increased gains in memory, organizational skills, and logic.


In Zaire the study Chess and Aptitudes, was conducted by Dr. Albert Frank at the Uni Protestant School, during the 1973-74 school year. Using sufficiently large experimental and control groups, Dr. Frank confirmed there was a significant correlation between the ability to play chess well, and spatial, numerical, administrative-directional, and paperwork abilities. The conclusion was that students participating in the chess course show a marked development of their verbal and numerical aptitudes. Furthermore, this was noticed in the majority of chess students and not only those who were better players.


"Can chess promote earlier intellectual maturation" was the question posed in the Chess and Cognitive Development study directed by Johan Christiaen from the 1974-76 school years in Belgium. The results again clearly confirmed that the group of chess playing students showed significantly more improvement then the non chess-playing students. In 1982, Dr. Gerard Dullea mentioned this study and proclaimed "…we have scientific support for what we have known all along-chess makes kids smarter! (Chess Life, November 1982) In a similar study done in a test series in New Brunswick, Canada called Challenging Mathematics, the mathematics curriculum used chess to teach logic from grades 2 to 7. The average problem solving score in the province increased from 62% to 81%.


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Column Energetics  US and World Energy News

George Harvey   

¶ who is stopping us?


September 24 Energy News


Opinion:

¶   “300,000-Plus People March for Climate Action, In Pictures” The Sunday morning rush hour is not usually known for packing people into subway cars like sardines. But September 21, 2014 was not your average Sunday commute as hundreds of thousands showed up for the People’s Climate March. [Scientific American]


¶   “A strong economy depends on climate action” When we act on climate, we seize an opportunity to retool and resurge with new technologies, new industries and new jobs. We owe it to our kids not just to act, but to lead. When we do, we’ll leave them a cleaner, safer and opportunity-rich world for generations to come. [The Hill]


¶   “Climate action – who is stopping us?” Fossil fuel industries are the only obstacle to a safe future and a stable climate, says Greenpeace International executive director Kumi Naidoo. But even the rich in industrialized countries know that they can’t hide from devastating climate change in their gated communities. [eco-business.com]


Science and Technology:

¶   Growing use of natural gas fails to benefit the environment because it slows the spread of renewable energy sources, according to a study released today. While natural gas releases less carbon dioxide than coal when burned to produce electricity, it hampers growth of cleaner energy such as wind and solar. [Mynextfone]


World:

¶   The Ernst & Young Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index ranks 40 markets worldwide on the attractiveness of their renewable energy investment and deployment opportunities. China is in first place, ahead of the US. Political uncertainty in the UK and Australia have dropped them in the rankings. [CleanTechnica]


¶   Mexico is facing an energy problem. A growing population and an expanding middle class are driving energy demand to increase 4% per year.  Mexico has a 60 GW energy demand, but that number will expand to 110 GW by 2024. And they want to solve this dreary problem with renewables. [Energy Collective]


¶   David Cameron announced at the Climate Summit that shale gas is part of Britain’s solution to tackling global climate change. Friends of the Earth however slammed Mr Cameron’s speech saying promoting fracking at a climate change summit “is like trying to sell cigarettes at a hospital.” [Energy Live News]


¶   The sub-Saharan African region is set to commission 1.8 GW of renewable power capacity in 2014. The region is emerging as an “exciting market” for investments in renewable energy technology such as onshore wind, small-scale and utility-scale solar and geothermal power. [African Review]


¶   In New Zealand, the new chief executive of the country’s Petroleum Exploration and Production Association told Radio New Zealand this morning that his industry is ready and willing to adapt to “the transition that we know will ultimately occur.” This leaves political climate change deniers out in the cold. [Scoop.co.nz]


US:



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Column O Citoyen!

Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast

“Health and Aging: a Federal Policy Update”

Robert Oeser

Aug 22, 2014


Report from: August 15, 2014

Gibson-Aiken Center, Brattleboro
                                  

Presenter: Sophie Kasimow  Sophie_Kasimow@help.senate.gov

US Senate Health Education, Labor and Pensions Committee

Staff Director, Subcommittee on Primary Health & Aging

Chairman Bernie Sanders (I-VT)

Phone: (202) 224-5480

www.sanders.senate.gov/help


Sophie Kasimow is Staff Director of the Subcommittee on Primary Health & Aging, one of three subcommittees which fall under the umbrella of the US Senate Health Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee. Sen. Sanders chairs this subcommittee which deals with community health centers; access to medical, dental, and mental health care; the primary care provider workforce; social services for seniors and the Older Americans Act; preventing and addressing elder abuse; among other health and aging policy issues.


The subcommittee was formed in May 2011 and Sophie joined the staff in June 2011 and became the subcommittee’s staff director in September 2012.


When it comes to health care, Vermont is doing better than other states.[1]  But health care in the US costs twice as much as in  other countries and US health outcomes are not particularly good by comparison.[2]


We also lack a sufficient number of primary care physicians. One out of five Americans experience a shortage of primary care providers and one out of four have  lack of access to mental health care. In addition, there is a need for access to dental care.


Sen. Sanders was instrumental in the expansion of Federally Qualified Health Centers in Vermont and across the country. Vermont now has 11 community health centers with over 50 delivery sites, and by the end of this year they will serve one in four Vermonters (over 160,000 Vermonters);[3] there are gaps in access in parts of the state, including the southern part of Vermont.  The National Health Service Corps has provided help for loans and scholarships to encourage primary care providers with federal matching funds in underserved communities.


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21 September


Tim Stevenson

Aug 31, 2014

  

   "Hope is not about peace of mind. Hope is action.

Hope is doing something.”

Chris Hedges

The social fabric of our world is increasingly unraveling.

Gaza, Syria, Iraq, and the wars without end against civilians. The Ukraine, and the return to the Cold War:  Ebola. Central American refugee children seeking sanctuary in the land of the free.  The rape epidemic.  Ferguson, Missouri. The twilight of democracy and human rights and the rule of the national security corporate state. The 1%.


And then, of course, there’s climate change. This is the issue that dwarfs all others because of its very real and imminent threat of mass extinction. Climate change is the one issue we have to somehow resolve (or there won’t be any other issues for us to worry about!); it’s also the one that must include the other issues as a necessary condition for its own resolution. Even more than the question of renewable energy, a successful transition to a viable and sane post oil society is about the values we choose to live by.

What needs to be done?


As we’ve emphasized often in this column, we need to develop resilient, collaborative communities and mutual aid neighborhoods that are founded upon compassion, courage, and social justice. We must learn to take care of ourselves and each other, adapting to the changes we’ll have no choice about making. For Vermonters, this will include dealing with greater precipitation, heavier rainfalls, and weather extremes that pose threats to floodplains, agriculture, infrastructure and transportation systems, not to mention tight state and municipal budgets.


And then there are the dangers that we’re not thinking about, the ones we feel we’re immune to, like inundation from the rising seas. But what about all those future climate refugees who live in New York, Boston, and elsewhere who will be seeking higher ground? How are we going to accommodate this flood of people, and their need for food, housing, and other basic necessities?


We need to come together as families and neighbors, communities and towns, and begin planning and acting strategically for a future that is already here. In the end, it’s the solidarity that arises from community activism that is our ultimate asset. <extract>


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Column The Great Adventure

The Feminine in the Twenty-first Century

Like A Girl

Terri Kneipp

Jul 1, 2014


Yes! Like A Girl


Wow. I feel remiss. Evidently I was supposed to feel responsible for the inappropriate ways men have ogled me since I was 12 or to think only girls should have to dress conservatively for school. This week has been full of stereotypical negative phrases, images and responsibilities about or toward girls and women being bandied about, discussed in multiple arenas, debated ad nauseam in other words, my mind is spinning. Between school dress codes to a broader discussion on modest dress to limiting phrases, let’s dive into the deep end.


Early in the week on a ladies forum, the talk turned to modest dress: what was appropriate, how to help men behave themselves, should cleavage be shown or not, etc. This in itself is a powder keg ready to start a maelstrom. My first thought was that it’s not my job to “help men” control their impulses; but, also that it was demeaning to men, assuming they couldn’t control themselves. Give the guys some credit: they all aren’t lecherous, leering dolts who are unable to be respectful using common decorum in every day life. Luckily, I found a video for Christian men from a Christian man (http://johnpavlovitz.com/2014/06/20/young-men-sex-and-urge-ownership-and-why-its-not-the-girls-problem/), so if you are not a Christian, you may not see an issue, that isn’t the point. My point is taking the responsibility for any action off of anyone other than the person who is committing the action. If a crime is committed, it should never be the victim’s fault.  If I choose to wear a tank top that shows a little cleavage, heaven forbid, because it is summer, I have an ample chest and it’s freaking hot and some man stares, that’s on him. I am not dressing a certain way to elicit a given response, but I am also not going to over react unless the behavior is obnoxious and intrusive. Being bundled from head to toe in puffy ski gear, I have had men make comments that weren’t appreciated and I dealt with them as any mature woman would, swiftly, clearly and leaving no doubt of my meaning. With that said, dressing fairly modestly is what works for me.


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This column is sponsored by Delectable Mountain Cloth

Mistaking emotion for lack of reason

Alan Rayner

Sep 19, 2014


Detachment of the observer from emotional involvement with the observed has been recognised as a requirement of objective reasoning since the Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution. This emotional detachment has been thought to be so essential to the making of impartial judgements that any expression of emotion has become inimical to abstract scientific methodology and discourse. Charles Darwin put it this way:-


"A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections, - a mere heart of stone."

Objective science and its underpinning definitive logic have hence gained a reputation for cold-heartedness, which is as off-putting to romantics as romanticism is to those who regard themselves as ‘hard scientists’. The resulting alienation of emotionality from science and vice versa has been psychologically, socially and environmentally damaging – a crippling negation of what truly ‘natural’ science has to offer for understanding of our place in the world as it actually is, and is a source of dreadful cruelty in the treatment of ourselves and other living creatures as ‘machines’.


The fallacy in alienating emotion from reason resides in the fact that there is good reason for the existence of emotion:  emotion is no more and no less than an expression of the natural energy flow (‘e-motion’) responsible for the emergence of living form.


The alienation of emotion from our natural understanding of life is hence, quite literally, deadening. It numbs us from awareness of what it means to be alive, by closing the door on the possibility of appreciating ourselves as inextricable natural dynamic inclusions of our neighbourhood. It renders our view partial and prejudiced, not comprehensively impartial.


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Op Ed

Witness to Genocide: Israel/ Palestine: A JOURNEY TO PEACE

The Op Ed writer is

Namaya

Aug 24, 2014



We are all tremendously saddened by the ongoing wars in Israel and Palestine, but it is a war that few Americans and outsiders can full understand.  Namaya, the poet and performance artist, has created this program “Witness to Genocide:ISRAEL/ PALESTINE: A JOURNEY TO PEACE and would like to present this at your school, church, or community center.


A trailer sample can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CltHSUoHr0&feature=plcp


This is a multimedia performance on the narrative of the Jewish Diaspora, the Palestinian people, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine (West Bank and Gaza.)  The performance combines stories, music, poetry, photography, and art based on Namaya’s story of living and working in Yemen, Morocco, and his travels through Palestine, Israel, and the Islamic world.  Namaya also speaks of his Jewish family’s journey out of Eastern Europe through such stories as “L’Chaim” and of Jewish life during the Diaspora.


Caption: Witness – in commemoration of Krystallnacht and the occupation of Palestine, in the witness that there can be peace in Palestine and a future for the children of Israel & Palestine.


Namaya said, “I tell this story out of necessity. In witnessing the destruction of our Jewish communities through pogroms and the holocaust, having touched the walls of Prague and Budapest with the names of my extended family who perished, and also seeing the present inhumane occupation of Palestine… I am obligated to tell this story. In telling I hope to create an opportunity for a future for the children of Israel and Palestine.”

The  program is a one person performance with multimedia, art work, and music.  It can be performed in a theater, school, or gallery space. At the end of the performance, there is an opportunity for discussion of the performance in the spirit of compassionate listening.


<extracts> Read More ➤


Real Food ! 


Recipes for Simple Meals

Red Sauce, White Sauce

Mac Gander

Oct 1, 2014



Basic Red Sauce

Saute chopped garlic and onion in a pan big enough to hold a couple of cans of tomatoes

Add peppers (red and green) if you want

Add some meat—Italian sausage, ground pork, or ground beef—and cook until browned

Add a couple of cans of crushed tomatoes, or else whole tomatoes that you crush with your hands

If the sauce is watery, add tomato paste

Add basil and oregano, maybe a little salt and pepper

Simmer for a while—at least 20 minutes, up to a couple of hours


Basic White Sauce

Saute chopped garlic and olive oil

Add other veggies (red peppers, broccoli, zucchini, carrots, fresh cherry tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes) along with cooked chicken or else seafood (e.g., clams or scallops)

If you are using uncooked chicken, cut it up and cook it with the onions and garlic before adding vegetables

When veggies have started to soften, add some basil and salt and pepper, and then add heavy cream or sour cream. You can also use lighter cream or milk, but then you have to first add some corn starch to thicken the sauce

Cook until the sauce is nice and thick, but don’t over-cook or the veggies will get mushy

Graphic Traffic

An orientation to illustration and illustrated books for writers

By Marlene O’Connor on Jan 16, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views

Street Dance – Flight, personal piece


Here are illustrations of Marlene’s work and she has also contributed notes on how to sensibly engage graphic artists, illustrators and publishers as a generous addition to orienting the writer to the subject.  

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This column is sponsored by www.zephyrdesignsvt.com


Dec 28th, 2011

Photo Brooks House Fire


Things started quietly enough with normal amounts of snow but the people in the municipal building could hardly anticipate multiple disasters in 2011  

Read More


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Last Entry Mac Gander

Photo Rudyard Kipling at Naulakha near Brattleboro.


130 years ago in 1880/81 Rudyard Kipling completed the 26 question questionnaire. Kipling subsequently moved to Brattleboro and Dummerston, living here from 1892 to 1896.


At the time it is said that Kipling was known by more people in the world than was any other person. I would like to publish your own responses in Vermont Views Magazine to the very same questions Kipling answered.




Please add your answers below the 26 questions on the questionnaire page, or write in for a set of emailed questions.


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StudioONE

Len Emery



The Project:


Goffstown Slaughterhouse



Here is a small representative sample of a fairly large project at a slaughterhouse in Goffstown.


The Photographer


Len Emery


"I come from an engineering background with all of its inflexibility and predefinition. Conversely, photography is often fleeting and very much undefined. I try to capture the image as it happens, the instant framed from my perspective for all to see my interpretation. I try to use the environment as an element of the image, allowing it to enhance and sometimes be the image. I then try to draw the viewer into the image as I was drawn in when I first saw it.


I am a pilot as well as a photographer and use my flying skills and camera together when doing contract aerial photography. All of my photos are typically of Vermont and in particular the villages and valleys of the Black River basin area.


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Studio TWO

Featuring

April at Gallery 2 Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works.

Featured in this photo exhibit are blue glass by Ed Branson [illustrated]; painting of sugaring by Paul Madalinski; horse by Joseph Fichter; circus photos by Jeffrey Lewis; stained glass canoe by David Wissman; paintings by Dane Tilghman. See More ➤


Studio 3

A seven color print, ‘Migration’, by William Hays


William Hays, printmaker

To view the images sequentially, click the link to Studio 3 and press ‘Play Slideshow.’

To illustrate a companion article on print making by Brattleboro artist William Hays, the subject kindly forwarded me these 7 images of a print in the making. The full article will appear as a Monthly Feature.  See More ➤


Studio 4

Featuring 6 Photographers



Len Emery

Phil Innes

Rich Holshuch

Merritt Brown

Ray Bates

Greg Worden



See More ➤


If You Lived Here

Brattleboro – A Comeback Town

Brooks House Grand Opening, Ribbon Cutting and Open House

Sep 30, 2014 


 WHO:             The Honorable Peter Shumlin, Governor of Vermont, Bob Stevens and Larry Cassidy, Brooks House Development and Joyce Judy, President, CCV, Dan Smith, President, VTC

 WHAT:            Grand Opening of the 24 million dollar redevelopment of the Brooks House

 WHEN:            Friday, October 3

 TIME:              5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

 WHERE:           Atrium, Brooks House

                        Main Street, Brattleboro


Background: Paris has its Eiffel Tower, Sydney has its Opera House, but Brattleboro, Vermont (pop. 12,000) has its own iconic building—the Brooks House. Built in 1871, the Brooks House has played a pivotal role in Brattleboro’s history. In its day, it was one of the premier hotels in New England and possibly the largest Second Empire style building outside of New York City, was a popular summer resort, well known in both Boston and New York, and the ballroom hosted lavish parties. It’s also had its fair share of fame. Rudyard Kipling used to play poker in the Tower Room and sip lager in the Tavern.


 April 17, 2011. The Brooks House suffers a five-alarm fire that nearly destroys the landmark building, along with the economic and aesthetic life of Brattleboro. A few months later Tropical Storm Irene slammed the downtown area, causing significant flooding.

 Since that summer, the block-long Brooks House in the middle of Main Street has been boarded up and surrounded by tarps and scaffolding. Bob Stevens of Stevens & Associates, Craig Miskovich of Downs Rachlin Martin, and Ben Taggard, Pete Richards and Drew Richards of The Richards Group joined together to buy, restore and renovate this downtown treasure. The investors saw a way forward by making use of Federal and State tax credits and a host of other financing sources. They turned to the community members to become shareholders. The State of Vermont supported the fit up of State College space. Vermont Rural Ventures and The Massachusetts Housing Investment Corp helped the Brooks House Development Team access New Market Tax Credits — federal tax credits available for projects in certain eligible population centers across the United States. 

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If You Lived Elsewhere

Rough Tor

  Aug 20, 2014



Rough Tor


Rough is pronounced ‘row’ to rhyme with ‘cow’. Rough Tor (/ˈraʊtər/ row-ter), or Roughtor, is a tor on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. The site is composed of the tor summit and logan stone, a neolithic tor enclosure, a large number of Bronze Age hut circles, and some contemporary monuments.


From the summit of Rough Tor, many signs of settlements and field systems are visible, indicating that it was a well populated area in former times.

Neolithic


The summit of Rough Tor once had a neolithic tor enclosure. The summit is encircled by a series of rough stone walls that align with natural stone outcroppings on the tor. The walls would have originally completely encircled the tor. The walls would have had numerous stone lined openings. In the interior of the circle there are remains of terraces leveled into the slopes, which archaeologists believe formed the foundations of circular wooden houses. There are also cleared areas near the terraces that have been garden plots.

Bronze Age


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Khaleesis replacing Amelias? Not hardly.


Worried about naming your child Khaleesi — Perhaps she will sue you in twenty years? Far safer to stick with Amelia. When it comes to popular baby names, Amelia has held the top spot since 2011.




At last count there were only 146 Khaleesis in the US, compared to five in 2010. In 2013 in the UK there were 50 Khaleesis and  11 Theons.


And as for Bilbo, I found this letter on an on-line baby-naming site:— <read on if you dare>


More in your ear ➤



Curious Topics


Vermont Zombie Hunting — a true story

Jul 28, 2014

They say true stories are best, so here is one from Zon Estes.


A new Vermont experience.
I'm working in the yard. I hear people talking, yelling. (Occasionally people walking on trails around find their way toward our house.) When they were clearly in the yard, I walked over toward them.


Them is about a dozen guys. What caught my eye was the shirtless fellow wearing a pink tutu, leading a few of his buddies off a slight distance. Then I saw that most were painted--either on the face or all over. Oh, and sunglasses.


When they saw me, they explained that they were looking for Zombies. By now, there must've been two dozen mostly naked, jazzed up guys, ready to roll.
I directed the Zombie hunters toward a commonly missed turn. I can still hear them in the woods, up on the hillside. Blowing whistles and bellowing.
“Where the hell am I?”

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send any answers or comments to onechess@comcast.net

100 Years Ago

Feature:  August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014





Caption: German soldiers embarking for the front


August 1

The German Empire declares war on the Russian Empire, following Russia's military mobilization in support of Serbia; Germany also begins mobilization. France orders general mobilization. New York Stock Exchange closed due to war in Europe, where nearly all stock exchanges are already closed.


August 2

German troops occupy Luxembourg in accordance with its Schlieffen Plan. A secret treaty between the Ottoman Empire and Germany secures Ottoman neutrality. At 7:00 pm (local time) Germany issues a 12-hour ultimatum to neutral Belgium to allow German passage into France.


August 3

Germany declares war on Russia's ally, France.

At 7:00 am (local time) Belgium declines to accept Germany's ultimatum of August 2.



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Local History

May 5, 2013


A lyrical homage by Charles Monette



With 1878’s best intentions, some sturdy men began

Building Brattleboro’s narrow gauge in the southeast kingdom

Upside verdant country, the West River, to South Londonderry

Financed by bankers’ bonds bought in towns’ river valleys

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Sep 7, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views


A photo essay of 40 images and caption


“Before The Fall”



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Reviews Old & New


 
Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

By Christian McEwen, Illustrations by Laetitia Bermejo


A note from the author on her new title.

 

In the fall of 2011, I published a book called World Enough & Time: On Creativity and Slowing Down. It could be read from start to finish, like any regular book. But because it was composed of 115 short sections, it could also be used as a source of daily prayer or meditation, focusing on one short portion at a time. In other words, it could serve to practice lectio divina or “divine reading.” As time went on, I was delighted to learn that it was indeed being used in just this way.

 

However, the book itself is fairly bulky, and several friends suggested that a more compact version would be welcome: a diary perhaps, or daily reader. This was the origin of the Tortoise Diaries: a mini treasure-house of poems and quotations, centered, like the original text, on creativity and slowing down.

 

Because World Enough & Time contained twelve chapters, and there are twelve months to every year, it seemed natural to transfer the structure from one book to the other, focusing in turn on different subjects, so that the month of January is used to introduce “the art of slowing down,” February to consider good company and conversation, March to investigate “child time,” and April, the joys and relaxation to be found in walking. Those who are familiar with the original text will recognize many of the entries, which have been arranged so as to flow smoothly from one to the next, helping to deepen and clarify each particular theme.


<extracts>  Read More ➤


Brattleboro Skyline

A massive photo essay with captions

Jun 11, 2014


The Slow Living Summit and The Strolling of the Heifers 2014


Read More ➤


Localvore Directory

Click this link for locally grown and manufactured food products and how to find them directly

Mar 24, 2013


To add your business to the free listing of Localvores — contact the publisher at onechess@comcast.net


Phone numbers, websites, e-mails, travel directions and hours of business of a few dozen local farms and businesses making Vermont food products. Support your local food economy!


Just Added — Full Plate Farm

 

Full Plate Farm is a one acre vegetable farm conveniently located one and a half miles from downtown Brattleboro, VT.  We grow over 100 varieties of delectable, nutritious veggies using organic practices. We offer a CSA which includes all of our veggies, as well as berries and sweet corn from a few other local farms. We offer 12 different share options, so that you can choose how much produce you get and when. We also offer options between some of the veggies in your share as well as a “swap box” so that you will always have a choice to trade out a veggie you don’t like for one you do. Every week we include recipes and cooking suggestions. 


Read More ➤


This column is sponsored by the Brattleboro Food Coop http://brattleborofoodcoop.coop


Write On!

VERMONT HIPPIE ZOMBIES

Martha M Moravec

Aug 5, 2013


Three years ago, Hurricane Irene surprised Vermonters – we who have grown complacent over our temperate, mostly gentle environment – with eleven quick inches of rain that led to the worst flooding the state had seen in eighty-four years. The rising waters forced evacuations, knocked out bridges, tore up roads, destroyed houses, left thousands of people stranded and in one case, took out an entire town, or most of it, and fiendishly wrecked the state’s emergency operations center. Three years later, people are still telling stories about the damage and in some cases, still rebuilding.

The story that sticks with me concerns the added injury suffered by Rochester, Vermont, where, according to one newspaper account, “a gentle brook swelled into a torrent and ripped through Woodlawn Cemetery, unearthing about twenty five caskets and strewing their remains throughout downtown.”

They now say that fifty graves were rooted out. I’ve no doubt that my imagination (and yours) can conjure up images far more gruesome than what actually surfaced that day. Even so, because aid and rescue teams were busy assisting the living in dozens of distressed towns (Rochester being one of the most distressed), an open casket with its remains plainly visible lay in the middle of the main thoroughfare for an indecent amount of time.

Eventually, volunteers ventured forth to try to identify the resurrected. Led by a former state trooper who just happened to have reinvented himself as a funeral home director, they marked and covered the muddy disarray of cracked vaults, overturned coffins, body parts, bones and tatters of clothing with blue tarp and little red flags.


<extract> Read More ➤


B.E.S.T

Are you wearing Dhaka?

Photo by Vermont Views Shop Window

This article is an extract from The Guardian, UK


When it comes to fashion, applying even the most modest ethical criteria is ridiculously hard. All the big chains – including Primark, which had a supplier in the destroyed Rana Plaza building on Dhaka's outskirts, and has promised "to provide support where possible" to the families of the 187 workers known to have died – have ethics policies that can be viewed online. None has a clearly labelled and readily availably Fairtrade or equivalent line on the shop floor.


Read More



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  Passages Daily  Obedience




“He who joyfully marches to music rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder.”

Albert Einstein


“Whatever you choose, however many roads you travel, I hope that you choose not to be a lady. I hope you will find some way to break the rules and make a little trouble out there. And I also hope that you will choose to make some of that trouble on behalf of women."

[Commencement Address, Wellesley College, 1996]”

Nora Ephron


“The greatest crimes in the world are not committed by people breaking the rules but by people following the rules. It's people who follow orders that drop bombs and massacre villages.”

Banksy


“The smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion, but allow very lively debate within that spectrum....”

Noam Chomsky


“Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.”

Henry David Thoreau


“I finally know the difference between pleasing and loving, obeying and respecting. It has taken me so many years to be okay with being different, and with being this alive, this intense. (xxvi)”

Eve Ensler, I am an Emotional Creature: The Secret Life of Girls Around the World

 

To This Degree


An image a day every day of the year

   


Today: Three “Old Masters” hanging on the wall of a special room in an art gallery


The need to return to source during a confused search for new value in a chaotic society


Oct 1 2014 Libra 9°  (1° to 15° Libra is TRANSFIGURATION in Act 3; GROUP INTEGRATION)

 
Column 4our

Writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Meandering knows no mean

Charles Monette

Sep 30, 2014

                     


Another 4Our is calling, come on…. your turn to churn in.  So, I’ll walk you through two labyrinths, one left, one right in between.


New joy discovered in Newport, New Hampshire, back of a Kelley yard, a labyrinth so enchanting. It brought awe and a morning nod.  Granite gates and portals abounded, Buddha surrounded every tree and my shoes came off, then alpaca socks in gracious harmony.


I was with new friends who made it even better, so I followed their lead to the center.  Along the way, the meander, green moss swallowed feet down somewhere.  A cushioning carpet of green, cool wet with dew lightened my dance, dropping weightlessly.  Smiles were easy as talk while we looked to see. 


Close to the Equinox, summer’s change into fall, I keep coming back to easy as I try my best to recall.  So, Wayne counsels to bring in new vision on a turn by a sycamore tree, and the light lightens, begins to set you free.


So all this might read non-earthshaking a walk round a bonsai tree, but it was simply captivating, engaging my feet and me.  The stones circled round as they do in the granite state.  Live free, then die, a hope for humanity. 


Yet, I was truly alightened, another new word by me, like beable, red-underlined google-wronged like a teacher’s remark used to be.


All changed this morning, as it is often wont to do.  Back in Vermont, just a jaunt in Jerry’s, yard a morning ritual that’s become habitual.  Alone here, with the quiet now. 


<extract> Read More ➤

 

Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Eugene Uman



Phil: Good acoustics in this room according to this recorder.


Eugene: This room is built for sound. We can get 150 people in here pretty comfortably, over 200 if they’re squeezed in.  The size of the space is about 2,000 square feet, it’s a great room. We put up behind the curtains there, carpeting, behind these and those wall hangings, and the stage also has heavy carpeting, and what we’ve done is reduce the liveness of the room until it sounds really good, to just the right amount so that things sound live but not overbearingly so.


Phil: How long have you been in this space?


Eugene: About 14 years.


Phil: And the space is at Cotton Mill Hill, with huge old wooden floors and high ceilings in a brick building which used to be a … [laughter]


Eugene: Right, a cotton mill, then the Dunham’s shoe factory, and some of these markings on the floor come from old machinery. This building has seen a lot of action. I remember when my wife and I were looking for space for the Vermont Jazz Center, we looked at a lot of spaces around town, and were thinking of buying a house, building an extension to it, and then we found this space. It was smaller at first, but we thought, this is it! One of those spaces that you walk in and you know it’s right. Very high ceilings, good sound quality, aesthetically pleasing.


Phil: When you say you were looking for a place does that mean you were moving here and looking for a place to start up?


Eugene: The thing is that Attila Zoller started this place, a magnificent guitarist from Hungary, and he started it 36 years ago. This place(the jazz center) has a venerable history; Zoller is a very famous person in the world of jazz. He had a place up in Newfane but most of his time was spent in Queens, New York City, where he had an apartment.  He was originally from Hungary and fled, on foot to Austria in 1948 after the Russian occupation.  He kicked around Europe for a while and then he moved to the United States in 1959 due to invitations from Lee Konitz and Oscar Pettiford, and partly to play with Benny Goodman…


Phil: Oh yeah?!


Eugene: Yeah! And partly because he received a scholarship to attend a school called the Lenox School, one of the first jazz schools to ever exist (in the late 50s).   He apparently roomed with the great saxophonist Ornette Coleman, but he himself was highly regarded at the time.  He has now passed on. He asked me to take over the the Vermont Jazz Center before it had an actual physical location. It existed as a non-profit that presented concerts and workshops in different locations.  For example, they did a summer workshop at Marlboro college one year, and did it at the Putney school another year, and they would hold concerts at let’s say the West Village Meeting House, or at the Mole’s Eye. [laughter] All over the place and when he asked me to take over as what he called executive director I was moving here with different ambitions because I didn’t have the kind of recording career that he had — I wanted it to be more focused on education, and he had the Summer workshops but I wanted education to be a year-round program.  We needed a location and I also wanted to host concerts here, so that’s the reason we looked around and we are now here in this space.

<extracts> Read More ➤

 

Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute


Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014


I first met Pete Seeger when I moved to Beacon, NY in 1999. On the first Friday of every month he held a meeting at his Sloop Club in Beacon. The Sloop Club was an offshoot of the Clearwater, which Pete had formed to clean up the pollution in the Hudson River. I made up my mind to meet Pete, and within a year I was the treasurer of the Sloop Club and even lived with my family in Pete’s original small house right next to his home at the top of a private mountain.

I enjoyed accompanying him on the train, or driving him to visits to his doctor in Manhattan or to visit friends. It was amazing to see the crowds of people that gravitated to him in Grand Central Station, or walking down the street wherever we went.

Pete was so humble and kind to everyone he met, inviting some of us to Thanksgiving Dinner with his family. Mickey and I spent weekends with Pete and Toshie and their daughter Tinya. The guest room was on the top floor of the barn that Pete had built himself. It was crowded with boxes of letters, instruments, awards and photographs which were eventually heading to the Smithsonian. There were instructions written on the walls of the bathroom in magic marker on how to flush the toilet and turn on the shower. Mickey was horrified when Pete showed us to the small room, and then expected us to sit down and sing with him. He introduced us to a new song, “God’s counting on You”, and the three of us sang the 8 verses together for the next hour. 

It is still difficult to comprehend that Pete and Toshie are no longer physically with us. Their partnership, their vision for a just and clean planet, and his music and her drive, affected the world for the better, and we will never forget them.


Read More ➤

 

If You Lived Here

Brattleboro – A Comeback Town

Brooks House Grand Opening, Ribbon Cutting and Open House

Sep 30, 2014 


 WHO:             The Honorable Peter Shumlin, Governor of Vermont, Bob Stevens and Larry Cassidy, Brooks House Development and Joyce Judy, President, CCV, Dan Smith, President, VTC

 WHAT:            Grand Opening of the 24 million dollar redevelopment of the Brooks House

 WHEN:            Friday, October 3

 TIME:              5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

 WHERE:           Atrium, Brooks House

                        Main Street, Brattleboro


Background: Paris has its Eiffel Tower, Sydney has its Opera House, but Brattleboro, Vermont (pop. 12,000) has its own iconic building—the Brooks House. Built in 1871, the Brooks House has played a pivotal role in Brattleboro’s history. In its day, it was one of the premier hotels in New England and possibly the largest Second Empire style building outside of New York City, was a popular summer resort, well known in both Boston and New York, and the ballroom hosted lavish parties. It’s also had its fair share of fame. Rudyard Kipling used to play poker in the Tower Room and sip lager in the Tavern.


 April 17, 2011. The Brooks House suffers a five-alarm fire that nearly destroys the landmark building, along with the economic and aesthetic life of Brattleboro. A few months later Tropical Storm Irene slammed the downtown area, causing significant flooding. Since that summer, the block-long Brooks House in the middle of Main Street has been boarded up and surrounded by tarps and scaffolding. Bob Stevens of Stevens & Associates, Craig Miskovich of Downs Rachlin Martin, and Ben Taggard, Pete Richards and Drew Richards of The Richards Group joined together to buy, restore and renovate this downtown treasure. The investors saw a way forward by making use of Federal and State tax credits and a host of other financing sources. They turned to the community members to become shareholders. The State of Vermont supported the fit up of State College space. Vermont Rural Ventures and The Massachusetts Housing Investment Corp helped the Brooks House Development Team access New Market Tax Credits — federal tax credits available for projects in cer­tain eligible population centers across the United States. 


 In 2013, New Hampshire’s Mascoma Bank agreed to become a lender to the project, along with Brattleboro Savings & Loan. The group closed on the deal in July 2013.


 The 80,000-square-foot building includes an 18,000-square-foot academic center for the Community College of Vermont and Vermont Technical College and classes have already begun. Oak Meadow home schooling will occupy the old ballroom space in the Brooks House.


 The building also features 23 upscale apartments, 4,000 square feet of office space and 32,000 square feet of a mix of retail, restaurants, cafes and shops, including Duo, the esteemed Denver restaurant and Wow Frozen Yogurt, Brilliance rugs and jewelry shop, and Turquoise Grille. The building will be mostly completed and occupied by the grand opening. The newly restored formal lobby leads to a dramatic two-story atrium that connects to shops and a renovated plaza.


Read More ➤

 
Column Open Mind

Recommendations for Controlling Lobbying

In the

Vermont Legislature

Offie Wortham

Sep 29, 2014


1.Require former legislators must wait a year before lobbying their ex-colleagues.

2.Deprive lawmakers-turned-lobbyists of privileges such as unfettered access to otherwise "members only" areas such as the House and Senate floors and the House gym.

3.One year ban on government employees from lobbying on issues they had worked on.

4.All qualified candidates should have access to public funding –at the very least they could spend more time on the issues and less time dialing for dollars.

5.The Office of the Vermont Secretary of State should expand the present website that displays every piece of legislation that is introduced to become a de facto online forum and clearinghouse, accessible to the general public, for purposes of transparency and accountability. This will be a forum for lobbyists, constituents, and other interested parties to come together to publicly and debate legislation, and in the process provide congressional staff, journalists, and the public access to the best available arguments, information, and ideas about public policy in a way that is easily searchable and sortable. Separate pages would exist for each bill introduced. Some pieces of legislation are incredibly complex, and may require multiple sub-pages for separate titles, sections, and amendments.

6.The Vermont Secretary of State will hire innovative thinkers and programmers to help develop and guide the architecture of these sites as they evolve. (Existing online forums such as Wikipedia, Yelp, and Reddit have all developed innovative mechanisms to usefully aggregate information and could serve as models.)

7.The system must allow individuals to update their comments as new information becomes available, and it has adequate functionality to aggregate, sort, and dis-aggregate comments based on who is writing and what they are saying.

8.Registered lobbyists will be required to first briefly state their client organization’s position on the bill (or amendment or section of the bill), and if they wish, to provide a simple aye-or-nay recommendation.

9.In order for this process to be effective, it must become the required conduit for lobbying.

10.Lobbyists have to file quarterly reports listing their clients, issues, and institutional targets and compensation?


Conclusion:—


The public and other interested parties will now be able to see who is advocating for what, what their arguments are, and what information they are basing those arguments on. Rather than endless reporting speculating about who is saying what behind closed doors and how special interests are twisting arms, this could shift public debate more to the actual arguments by making those actual arguments and facts more easily accessible and comparable. Public interest groups who can’t afford to hire enough lobbyists to schedule multiple meetings with every office will now have a more level playing field on which to compete. They also will be able to see what corporations are arguing, and will more easily be able to respond to these allegations. Likewise, corporations can respond to any unfounded allegations their critics might be spouting.

<extract> Read More ➤

 

Real Food ! 


Recipes for Simple Meals

Red Sauce, White Sauce

Mac Gander

Oct 1, 2014



Basic Red Sauce

Saute chopped garlic and onion in a pan big enough to hold a couple of cans of tomatoes

Add peppers (red and green) if you want

Add some meat—Italian sausage, ground pork, or ground beef—and cook until browned

Add a couple of cans of crushed tomatoes, or else whole tomatoes that you crush with your hands

If the sauce is watery, add tomato paste

Add basil and oregano, maybe a little salt and pepper

Simmer for a while—at least 20 minutes, up to a couple of hours


Basic White Sauce

Saute chopped garlic and olive oil

Add other veggies (red peppers, broccoli, zucchini, carrots, fresh cherry tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes) along with cooked chicken or else seafood (e.g., clams or scallops)

If you are using uncooked chicken, cut it up and cook it with the onions and garlic before adding vegetables

When veggies have started to soften, add some basil and salt and pepper, and then add heavy cream or sour cream. You can also use lighter cream or milk, but then you have to first add some corn starch to thicken the sauce

Cook until the sauce is nice and thick, but don’t over-cook or the veggies will get mushy

Read On and for More Reader’s Recipes ➤

 

Weather

Oct 1, 2014





from NOAA

The National Weather Service


Brattleboro:


A chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 65. Northeast wind 3 to 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.


Tonight
A chance of showers, mainly before 1am. Cloudy, with a low around 51. Northeast wind 3 to 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 40%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.


National:


Severe weather possible for parts of Plains on Wednesday


The NWS Storm Prediction Center is forecasting a risk of severe thunderstorms Wednesday afternoon and evening across portions of the central Plains and mid-Missouri Valley, with a higher concentration of severe storms possible in parts of eastern Kansas and far southeast Nebraska. Large hail and damaging winds could occur with the stronger thunderstorms. A tornado or two will be possible as well.


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Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack from her title

Art & Soul

Extending the boundaries


I always wanted to draw realistically. For me, art is a continuous discovery of reality, an exploration of visual data, that has been going on for centuries, each artist contributing to the next generation’s advancement. I wanted to go a step further and extend the boundaries. I also believe people have a deep need to understand their world, and that art clarifies reality for them.


—from an interview in Art Talk, with Cindy Nemser, 1974

 

The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014

                                                                        

Avid readers find themselves drawn to a book even though they are not familiar with the writer’s work or subject matter. Oddly enough, insights gleaned from that book relate precisely to the reader’s current circumstance and or/ questions. The brain works by physical connections. Memory works by connection.  People work by connection too. We are not isolated from others. Writers, painters, biologists, physicists arrive at similar theories although they have no connection with one another’s work and reside at opposite sides of the earth. We are all moving to a higher level of consciousness and if a piece of new information facilitates that process, it is vital to convey it to others even if they do not wish to hear it or accept it.


Dr.Rollo May, the famous psychoanalyst, in his book titled The Courage to Create points out that innovative creative thinkers have always been a threat to established society because the new ideas they champion destroy the structure and conventions of the established society. Picasso is quoted as having said that” to create means first to destroy.” We cannot forget those who have been crucified for ideas that challenged the norms of their times. The list is endless.  Although the individual is burnt at the stake or crucified, the idea he/she proposed, the vision remains intact and blooms like a flower over centuries.  Apes do not have a Jesus Christ or Joan of Arc.


Dr.Rollo May was fascinated with the creative process and the work produced through the fusion of the conscious and unconscious. He speaks of the “heightened consciousness” experienced when one is immersed in the act of creation: the feeling of floating suspended in time, the lack of appetite, the increase of heartbeat, the intense concentration, the sheer joy as if one were flying; indeed, one is released temporarily from our conception of time and space that Einstein regarded as illusion or our way of coping with our short life span by dividing time into past, present, and future. We cannot travel at the speed of light while here in our bodies on earth, but the artist and writer in the act of creation feels he/ she moves at the speed of light. Everything that has been muddied or dim is suddenly clarified and abnormally vivid: long buried memoires surface as if they are occurring now. Ideas that seemed vastly different form solid rational connections.


<extracts> Read More ➤

 

Monkey’s Cloak


The slightest notice

Charles Monette

                             


Consider slanders, shoulder slights

Utter rants and slobber away my little sleepy head

Indeed be fond enough to detest freethinkers

Their worthless, although occasionally earnest beliefs


Be content, don’t let bickering create a desert round your heart

Beware the confidence man’s sad regrets meant to confuse you

A quarrel, an isolated row, goes by without the slightest notice

Tolerate the intolerable, spare further trouble


Let me have my say

Never doubt your way

Truly stand up and take account of your actions

Reproach the obstinate for the sake of appearances


Count yourself fortunate whenever questions alter your mood

Follow your enemy calmly, decisively and humanely

Behave sensitively, surely sincerely… belittle sympathy

Absolutely refuse censoring, attach importance for instance


Certainly something apart, perhaps between, or even amiss

Naturally goodness flies on a whim despite the fix

Delivering far flung affairs of little importance

Astonishing remedies fling systematically to the winds


Offer apologies for nothing

For reasons usually kept quiet, shout to the mountaintop

Perfectly acquired morality, recently rumbling aside

Casts a dry formal style often thwarted by salty language


extract

Read More ➤

 

Daily Articles

To This Degree

An image a day for every day of the year.


Passages

& Quiz Quote


Weather

Local & National


Pretty Often

Art & Soul

Notes on Creating


New

Feature

Articles


Real Food !


Red Sauce,

White Sauce

Mac Gander

Oct 1, 2014




If You Lived Here

Brattleboro – A Comeback Town

Brooks House Grand Opening, Ribbon Cutting and Open House

Sep 30, 2014 




Column

4our

Meandering knows no mean

Charles Monette

Sep 30, 2014




Weekly Feature


In Conversation with Eugene Uman

Sep 30, 2014



Column

Open Mind

Recommendations for Controlling Lobbying

In the

Vermont Legislature

Offie Wortham

Sep 29, 2014



A Word In Your Ear

Khaleesis replacing Amelias?

Not hardly

Sep 26, 2014


Selected Letters

Pete Seeger Tribute

Offie Wortham

Sep 25, 2014




Column

Old Lady Blog

The Courage to Create

Toni Ortner

Sep 25, 2014




Column

Energetics 

US and World Energy News

George Harvey

¶ who is stopping us?

Sept 24, 2014


Monkey’s Cloak

The slightest notice

Charles Monette

Sep 23, 2014




Column

4our

The Lastlings

Nanci Bern

Sep 22, 2014



Column

Nurturing Nature

Fall

Tasneem Tawfeek

Sep 20, 2014



Column

Natural Inclusivity

Mistaking emotion for lack of reason

Alan Rayner

Sep 19, 2014




Vermont Diary



Strange brew

Sep 18, 2014




Column

Untitled Work

The Language of the Tribe

Mac Gander

Sep 17, 2014





Column

Post Oil Solutions

21 September

Tim Stevenson

Sep 16, 2014




Weekly Feature


In Conversation with Julia Ferrari

Sep 15, 2014


Column

4our

Friends With Benefits

Laura Momaney

Sep 14, 2014



Non Profit of the Month


Turning Point

Sep 14, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak


Matrix…Nine…Words…Eleven

Nanci Bern

Sep 11, 2014



Column

Open Mind

"Over Forty, Over Educated, and Underemployed"

Offie Wortham

Pt 2 — Sep 11, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

A note from the author

Aug 26, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Two Poems,

Personal Hawaiian and Heartsong of Hawaii Nation

Jeri Rose



Column

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Double barreled slingshot 7

Jeri Rose

Sep 8, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Can we talk? 

Charles Monette

Sep 6, 2014


Column

Old Lady Blog

Amazing GRACE:

Global Citizens and Artists for Social Change

Toni Ortner

Sep 4, 2014


Column

4our

No Sword School

Matti Salminen

Sep 4, 2014



New Column Littoral Sojourn

Pilgrimage Part 1:

Len Emery

Sep 1, 2014


Open Mind

"Over Forty, Over Educated, and Underemployed"

Offie Wortham

Aug 31, 2014


Old Lady Blog

OUR MAN IN BLACK

Toni Ortner

Aug 29, 2014


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Len Emery

Aug 27, 2014



Publisher’s Challenge #5

“places of disinhabitation”

Mac Gander

Aug 19 2014



Reviews Old & New

Tortoise Diaries: Daily Meditations for Creativity and Slowing Down

Review by

Phil Innes

Aug 26, 2014




Vermont Diary

News

Aug 25 2014



OP ED

Namaya

Witness to Genocide: Israel/ Palestine:

A JOURNEY TO PEACE

Aug 24, 2014





Chess

Phil Innes

Math and Chess for America’s Schools

Aug 23, 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

The Battle of the Somme River and the Story of Atlantis

Aug 21, 2014



Selected Letters

Vidda Crochetta

Kissin’ Cousins

Aug 14, 2014



Special Feature

DROLL OF THE MEREMAID

Lutey of The Lizard




Publisher’s Challenge

In 750 words or less

Fantasy Island

Aug 10, 2014



Reviews Old & New

Voices Like Wind Chimes

By Arlene F. Distler

Reviewed by: Mary W. Mathias

 Poet With a Painter’s Eye

Aug 9, 2014




Open Mind

Offie Wortham

IBM 1960

Aug 8, 2014



Write On!

Martha M Moravec

VERMONT HIPPIE ZOMBIES

Aug 5, 2014



100 Years Ago

Feature: August 1914

The First World War Begins

Aug 3, 2014





New Column

Nurturing Nature

Tasneem Tawfeek

Air

Jul 31, 2014



Weekly Feature

The Wild Mountain Thyme

Jul 28, 2014



Curious Topics

Vermont Zombie Hunting — a true story

Jul 28 2014


New Column

Articulate

Kate Anderson

Leadership

Jul 15, 2014


StudioONE

Len Emery

Goffstown Slaughterhouse

Jul 11, 2014


Guest Article

Christian McEwen

Teach Slow

Jul 11, 2014



The Great Adventure

Terri Kneipp

Like a girl

Jul 1, 2014



Beer & Bangers

J.D McCliment’s and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Jun 30 2014



Monthly Feature

Photo Essay

William Hays,

print maker

February, 2014