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New Features, Articles & Columns


Ponder me

We’ve Come Undone: 

Our Gender Problem

Shanta Lee


in between

FEAR

Julia Ferarri


Post Oil Solutions

Integrity in the time of

climate change

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Last leaves leaving

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Braveheart

Elizabeth Hill


Ponder me

Moonlight or “I, too, Am America” for a New Era?

Shanta Lee


Urban Naturalist

Hogle in Fall:

a Subdued Sanctuary Hunkers Down for Winter

Lloyd Graf


Guest Article

Trimalchio in the White House: The American Dream Comes True

Mac Gander


Vermont Diary

Quality of Life


An A-musing Life

11/12 and Counting

Nanci Bern


World & US Energy News

Nov 15 Just one day in the energy life of the planet

George Harvey


Meanderings

As if

Charles Monette


Open Mind

What Will Become Of The Trump Faithful?

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Clouds

Charles Monette


Write On!

Castle Dor


Vermont Diary

Words or Deeds


SCREENplay

Sully

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Living in the Twilight Zone

Elizabeth Hill


100 Years Ago

Births

in 1916


Chess

Susan Polgar:

Little Known Feminist Icon

Alicia Colon


Natural Inclusivity

What is ‘Natural’ Science?

Alan Rayner


Meanderings

Evil frog monsters

Charles Monette


Special Feature

Halloween

Robert Burns


SCREENplay

The Girl on the Train

Lawrence Klepp


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Who Sleeps Daily in S.C.?

&

S.C. City Council

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Why just now

Charles Monette


Returning To Place

PRIUS

Brian D. Cohen


in between

After a Fire Puja

Julia Ferarri


Vermont Diary

Out of the closet


Old Lady Blog

LESBOS, GREECE

Toni Ortner


The First Glass

Journal Entry –

October 3, 2016

Vincent Panella


Meanderings

Another way up

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

The Light Between Oceans

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Déjà Vu at Asteroid Chasm

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Café Society

Lawrence Klepp


An A-musing Life

A Snow Bunny in Summer

Nanci Bern


Meanderings

The mountain was soft

Charles Monette


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Malaise

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Out of time


The First Glass

Who Art In : Moment : Youth

Vincent Panella


Urban Naturalist

THE HOGLE PANORAMA

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

The Pony Man

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Lots of words to it


Monkey’s Cloak

Beyond the pale

Charles Monette


Chess

World Chess Championship to take place in New York

Phil Innes


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of observations and poems by Alan Rayner, part 7

‘Bridestones’


Love In Action

“The Missionary of Water”

Dr. Masaru Emoto

Elizabeth Hill


Selected Letters

Marbles

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

from a forthcoming work...

Toni Ortner


in between

A QUIET RAIN FALLS

Julia Ferarri


STORY PAGE

Rose’s Spring

A graphic novel in slide show format by MM Kizi


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s energy news, July 2016 “Setbacks

George Harvey


Open Mind

The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Frost in the Summer

Nanci Bern


Returning To Place

Emblem

an essay and 5 images

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

Birthday boy


Love In Action

Neptune and Jupiter

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of poems

by Alan Rayner, part 5

Howard’s Castle


Selected Letters

In Memoriam

Dorothy M. Rice, 1919 - 2016


Open Mind

Malcolm and Ali

Offie Wortham


Vermont Diary

SHOCK of the Present


Open Mind

Can we bite the bullet until after November?

Offie Wortham


Returning To Place

Interlude, New Book & Kickstarter

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

SHAVUOT

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

five directions, five fingers, five roots

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

US Politics for Forns from Yurp [part deux]


Monkey’s Cloak

UP NORTH

Phil Innes


Write On!

Women of the Mounds

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Colleges where your child can earn a Degree for Free

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Ticks and Tourism


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early May

George Harvey


Untitled Work

Hitler’s Secret Diaries, Or, Some Bullshit Happening Somewhere

Mac Gander


Old Lady Blog

Lights out or the weather of the apocalypse

Toni Ortner


Write On!

Daniel Berrigan

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


The Great Adventure

The Fairer Sex

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Returning to Place

Angel

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Returning to Place

Adam and Eve’s Lament. Etching and letterpress,

11” x 15”, 1997

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Returning to Place

Tree Trunk (Douglas fir)

Brian D. Cohen


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers

a feline alphabet

MM Kizi


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Returning to Place

The Wood

Brian D. Cohen


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


O Citoyen!

Community survey on future fire and police buildings

Robert Oeser


Vermont Diary

Weeding out the truth about “It”


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Monkey’s Cloak

Broken Promise

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


100 Years Ago

November & December

From nude cinema to Einstein, to sinking of hospital ships in WWI


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Studio 4

Now Showing

December Works at

Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Monkey’s Cloak

Snake

D. H. Lawrence


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Post Oil Solutions

Climate Change Café Hosts Carbon Pollution Tax Presentation

Tim Stevenson


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Monkey’s Cloak

CARACOL OF SOULS

Terry Hauptman


World & US Energy News

Just one days news

in mid-November

George Harvey


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


StudioTWO

Featuring Cai Xi

November Paintings at Vermont Artisan Designs


Monkey’s Cloak

Five Haiku

Andrea Wallens Powell


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


If You Lived Here

Brattleboro Winter Farmers’ Market


O Citoyen!

Restorative Justice

Robert Oeser


Monthly Feature

Picasso sculpture at MoMA

Marnie Innes


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


100 Years Ago

Edith Louisa Cavell

Pioneering nurse executed October 1915


Weekly Feature

In conversation with Kathy Leo


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


REAL FOOD !

Tomatoes galore

Phil Innes


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay


Consolation of History

A hundred things to hide

Martha M Moravec


The Great Adventure

What will your daughters see?

Terri Kneipp


StudioOne

The Plains Indians, America’s Early Artists, at the Met

Marnie Innes






Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






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In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





Shanta Lee

We’ve Come Undone: 

Our Gender Problem

Ponder me 




PART 1: While flipping through the pages of this week’s New York Times Fashion Magazine, I became transfixed by an androgynous blank face staring back at me.  This particular model appeared several more times with the same unchanged expression in a Spartan fashion shoot accompanied by the words,  “She’s Come Undone.”  The title and photographs added to my observations about the current state of gender in America.  The truth is that we are all becoming undone amidst the debate over gender especially as we engage language in our attempt to erase categories. 


Private spheres of confusion: My eyes adjusted to the image of a young face in short hair dressed soft pinks and blues while trying to figure out if I was looking at a woman or a man.  My internal questioning did not negate my appreciation of the androgynous presentation of the traditionally gendered colors pink and blue.  In one frame, a pale pink shirtdress hung off of the model’s body in a stance that was not wholly feminine with a hint of street masculinity.   


By today’s standards, I am wrong for questioning the categories of this image yet my mind continues to raise the question.  Who am I looking at?


[Image: New York Times, Photographer Martin Perlaki]


The photographs reminded me of an early 90’s Duran Duran song, “Come Undone.”  Perhaps there is no connection yet the music video provides the perfect visual to our state of being undone around gender.   Among the disparate images within this particular music video, we see a guy in a suit and tie tugging off his coat mid-stride.  In another shot, he rips off his tie and unbuttons the pinstripe shirt to expose a black lacy slip.  The scene ends with the guy in a red dress and red lipstick that he begins to smear all over his face.

Read on here >



Julia Ferarri

Fear

in between




Recently I’ve been reminded of the power of fear—our collective and our individual fears: of moving forward, of the unknown, of change. Trauma in life hits us with such unexpected force, catching us unaware or unprepared and sometimes leaving us seemingly incapable of dealing with the after effects: the path ahead, the new normal. Are there ways we can steer ourselves ahead within a state of uncertainty, and still manage to steady ourselves (and others) without putting the brakes on and abandoning our reality? Can we take small steps forward and even watch our potent reactions and aversions to our circumstances?

 

Life keeps changing, nothing we relied on in the past can absolutely be relied on in the future, because everything in the universe moves, spins, unfurls, closes, disappears, reappears—without our control. Beloved trees are cut down, sources dry up, hopeful candidates lose, and people die, but just as importantly, new seedlings survive and grow, new sources of inspiration or substance appear, and new people or opportunities enrich our lives.

 

Life hits us, life hurts. … it can’t be avoided. Sometimes our physical selves just want to stop us from moving on. Armies within us who want to protect us cry out, we panic, we cry, we can’t breathe, we face what seems like the end of the world … we step on the brakes… Read On >>



Tim Stevenson addresses

“Integrity in the time of climate change”

Post Oil Solutions




On the same day this past August when President Obama was in Baton Rouge offering condolences to victims of a disastrous 1000 year, climate-powered storm, his Department of the Interior was a few miles away in New  Orleans accepting bids at an auction for new oil drilling leases in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of that auction, British Petroleum, whose Deepwater Horizon drilling platform had exploded only four years earlier, killing 11 workers and causing more than 200 million gallons of oil to spew into the Gulf, was awarded 24 new leases in the Gulf.


It is tempting to dismiss this egregious disconnect between being the “Climate President” he wants to be known as, and the “all of the above” enabler of continued fossil fuel drilling and extraction he has often been as just another instance of the hypocrisy that unfortunately has often characterized the Obama Administration around climate change. While valid, to leave it at that would be to overlook something that is important for all of us to understand, not only about our President, but more importantly, about ourselves. 


Read On>>>>


Jeri Rose address

Racism vs Sexism in

Archetypal Hippie Speaks




I know that I have something to explore because I just said a hasty good-bye and hung up on a person feeling an uncomfortable tightening in my gut. What we were talking about started with him going on about his favorite topic. He is an African American and his experience is that people in this society react to him negatively.

               He went on about how they think he is going to steal from them. They grab their purses and cell phones as a response to his presence. We are living in Hawaii and there are not a lot of African Americans here so whatever prejudice has settled into the pale people over here from the forty-eight states seems to have also seeped into the mélange of mixed people here of Philippine, Hawaiian, Portuguese, Japanese, heritages. There are plenty of pale European people here, but their number is far less than in America. This is the Pacific Islands here and part of the United States, but we are not America. Therefore there are a number of subtle niceties in language and attitude that differentiate this little third world economy embedded into the first world economy of the most powerful country on earth. One might think that the attitudes of racism would not have made it here, but they did. They made it with the Europeans who set up the plantations and hired and imported workers. Even the Portuguese, who are European, were subjected through their poverty and their browner coloring to being held to the lower class status that is part of the racism stamp.

Read more Here



On the trail with Charles Monette in Meanderings

Last leaves leaving




After a mostly cloudy weekend with a forecast of rain on the way, I drove to Black Mountain into a clear blue day. 


On the road just prior to the trail’s entryway, I passed a bucolic pond resting in a bygone grass green meadow.  A weathered wood plank dock jutted into the water for about 13 feet, and I envisioned a kid running barefoot, leaping out into a cannonball’s summer splash. 

              

Today the pond was placid, mirroring the sky.


Dressed in slightly warmer wool, I donned my yellow reflective bike-riding vest and headed up.  Not 50 meters in, a beautiful woman came bounding down the trail with two similarly vested dogs.  We talked of precautions in hunting season.  She conceded that maybe she should have invested in yellow or orange cloth too!


This lady said she was off to a shower then to sell real estate, lamenting being too busy to spend more time on the mountain.  I was thankful that I had all the time I needed.


Read On Here >>>



Braveheart

is Elizabeth Hill’s December column for

Love In Action




Earlier this Fall, I received a picture via email from my daughter Kate, asking if I’d be interested in fostering or adopting a sweet senior Jack Russell Terrier who needed a forever home. True enough, the dog in the picture was very cute, but in spite of an instant quiver in my gut that hinted this was somehow meant to be, my initial answer was No Thanks! I was told her name is Annie and that she is nine and three-quarter years old.


A couple weeks later I got another note from Kate. She expressed to me: Mom, I think she’s right for you. She has lots of energy, and is very affectionate. If she doesn’t find a home, she may have to go to a shelter. The family she’s with here in Brooklyn has three other large dogs and a brand new baby. Though she’s very good with the baby as well as the other dogs, they feel badly for her because they can’t give her the attention she needs.


Kate promised to go meet Annie and make sure that we’d be a good fit if I would consider fostering her. Needless to say, Kate’s visitation report convinced me to give it a try. During the six weeks before her arrival here, Annie’s story began to emerge bit by bit. With each new detail, the initial ‘gut quiver’ I’d felt with that first picture began to make perfect sense, and I knew in my heart Annie had found her forever home.


According to what I was told, Annie was two when an elderly woman named Eleanor Ross rescued her from a Florida shelter. Eleanor had apparently been attracted to the senior dog because Annie was a beloved family name. So, Annie the dog became known as Annie Ross.

Read the full article.


Lloyd Graf

Urban Naturalist

Hogle in Fall:

a Subdued Sanctuary Hunkers Down for Winter




The Hogle Sanctuary, whose exuberant warm weather charms I praised in Vermont Views a couple of months ago, has presented a more subdued facade of late.  Most deciduous trees have been barren for a month now.  Even Maple saplings that had remained green for weeks in the shadows of their largely denuded parent trees at the Eaton Place end of the Sanctuary trail, started yellowing as October kicked over into November. By now they, too, have contributed most of their leaves to the dense underfoot mat. Factor in the still depressing (to me) stunted appearance of the Sanctuary acres south of the boardwalk, where the once lush mix of wildflowers, tall grass and plain weeds has been so closely cropped down by Foundation groundskeepers as to invite scalping analogies, and the composite visual effect is stark, austere; impressive in its severity, but not my style.


Naturalistically (zoologically) speaking, Hogle has also moved toward austerity during the past month or more.  No longer does each visit to the Sanctuary offer a likelihood of sassy entertainment by high energy avian choruses.  The catbirds, those cheeky,  insouciant jeer-mongers, have been AWOL since the choke cherry yield gave out in mid October.  Once-abundant  robins and redwings (I never thought I'd miss the latter), kingbirds and assorted flycatchers had all departed earlier. The vulture flock with its virtuosic aerial maneuvers far above nearby Putney Road/CT River Valley area roosts,  all vanished in one fell swoop about a month ago. The once-reliably observable resident fishing bird contingent with their eccentric-appearing, but highly effective predatory gambits, also dwindled.  For example, I haven't seen a once regularly present Great Blue Heron stalking its prey in shallows by islands to the northwest of the Sanctuary jetty for at least a month (a surprise given prior experience with Midwestern Great Blues, who tended to hang around their hunting ponds even after hard freezes if any open water remained). The Kingfishers have become progressively less of a presence:  not all gone, but strangely reticent about cutting loose with their endearingly strident rattle calls or launching daredevil splash dives. (Osprey, the other  high-wire fish diving birds known to frequent the Sanctuary and Retreat Meadows, have not revealed themselves to me during my half-year of Sanctuary visits).

Read on>>>



Trimalchio in the White House:

The American Dream Comes True

Guest Article

Mac Gander




After the election I spent much time reading accounts in the establishment press and following the stream of memes and alternative news articles in my Facebook feed. I spent two weeks writing through the lens of political journalism, and I can tell you where those votes for Clinton disappeared in the precincts of Michigan and Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. I am sick of it.


This is the last thing I will write about the election, obsessed with it as all of us still must be. There are other lenses than the considered demographics of Nate Silver’s 538 and “Upshot” in The New York Times. Perhaps this is one worth looking through.


The American Dream

Since Donald J. Trump was elected to the presidency, I have been re-reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, that quintessential rendering of the American Dream.

It is not sufficient in itself, but Fitzgerald’s masterwork provides a lens through which to regard Trump’s ascension to the most powerful position in the world—a masterwork of his own, though a writer for a different stage, one that tells us just how much darker the dream has become since Fitzgerald wrote his version of it, dark enough as it was.

There is no exact analogy between Fitzgerald’s creation of Gatsby and Trump’s self-creation as president of the United States. But Gatsby in Fitzgerald’s novel was as self-created as Trump is, and both men embody a kind of Promethean energy—not to steal fire from the gods but to seize the American Dream and hold it captive.

We know how Gatsby’s story turned out—that corpse floating in a cold swimming pool at the end of an endless summer. We don’t know how Trump’s story will turn out, but I doubt that it will have a happy ending.

Read on>>>>


Quality of Life

Vermont Diary




No ovens at the community kitchen Loaves and Fishes this week. Same as last week when we entertained two state senators, a Bernie Representative, the town manager and 20 others who had jurisdiction on the fate of the hungry and homeless. Under a program organized by Sandglass Theater, all these visitors mixed with our clientele with same food, same line, same tables — on Tuesday and Friday on twin colloquia with topics of food security and homelessness… first time in 10 years we had seen any of these folks — and we had one of our two ovens out.


Both local newspapers declined to show up, so I will have to report to you myself.


Our oven is estimated to be 80 years old. True, there were flames coming out of the front, but we got that fixed at expense of current situation where both ovens were gonzo.


We trucked our stuff over to the Senior Center and cooked it there — we have done same for them, but dammit, this is playing light with people’s welfare, no?

Read More



Nanci Bern writes about the election in

An A-musing Life

in Tuesday to Saturday diary form




<extract> Friday:

In a need for some relief of growing fears I wondered “What would be in my swag bag from this new venue of the Un-United States?” The grips dissolved in my hands when I picked it up. Clearly, I didn’t have a handle on this thing yet.

But then there were the swastikas.  I remembered learning about Nazis as a child, and being afraid to go to the bathroom at night because I would see two Nazis there with guns.

The hatred and bigotry is not only pointed toward Jews, I know this; but because the Nazi Swastika is still the symbol used, as it has become a container for all hatred; I cannot help but feel the time when I was in third grade and had rocks thrown at me for being Jewish.

The darkness of generational pain and loss again stops my breath, but it also sharpens my eyes and makes my feet want to walk hard on the path to join in the fixing.

We cannot become quiet and still after the first spate of protests fade, and our everyday lives call us back. What is ahead is daunting. It is bigger than each of us. It has also happened before. We have to look at history and finally learn from it. I fear that if we do not do this, and do not work together in a committed, compassionate and smartly strategic way, we will become the country of our nightmares.


Read on >>>>



Nov 15 Just one day in the energy life

of the planet

World & US Energy News

George Harvey



Science and Technology:

¶ The World Meteorological Organization said that 2016 will “very likely” be the hottest year on record and blamed climate change for the growing frequency of extreme weather events. The WMO’s report blamed climate change for melting Arctic glaciers and rising seas, just as the US’ president elect threatens to abandon climate efforts. [CNN]


¶ The top US negotiator told a packed COP22 news briefing that the passion and dedication displayed in the effort to deliver the Paris treaty was strong enough to withstand whatever impacts may come of a Trump presidency. He said, however, that he had no news on who might lead on climate change issues in a Trump administration. [BBC]


¶ Businesses reported $14 billion of losses in 2015 due to water scarcity, droughts, and tightening environmental regulations, a report released at the climate summit in Marrakech said. Of over 1,200 of the largest listed companies exposed to water risk, just about half responded, so the loss figure is clearly underreported badly. [The Guardian]


¶ Civil societies from across the globe converged at the UN’s COP22 conference, demanding that world leaders halt fossil fuel extraction and make an urgent just transition to a clean energy future to slow climate change. Experts say the reductions needed to limit warming to 1.5° C will require more reductions than have been pledged. [NorthEast Today]

<extract>    Read On >>>



Offie Wortham asks

What Will Become Of The Trump Faithful?

OPEN MIND




Most of the material in this short article came from two books. One, Strangers in their own land, by Arlie Hichschild, and the other Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance. Both of these writers give similar explanations for the massive following of whites, predominantly working-class males, who have come to see Donald Trump or Bernie Sanders as their saviors. Because I feel that the messages coming from these two books is crucial in our understanding of the appeal of Mr. Trump and Mr. Sanders, I have attempted to synthesize the two books down to a short article by paraphrasing and taking some literary license. I have tried to avoid plagiarizing or giving the reader the impression that most of these ideas are my own.


According to these authors, Obama looks like an alien to many working-class whites for reasons that have nothing to do with his skin color.  They admit that…”The president is brilliant, wealthy, and speaks like a constitutional law professor … He conducts himself with a confidence that comes from knowing that the modern American meritocracy was built for him. Even though some of them claim that Obama is a liar, a crypto-Muslim, an articulate, teleprompter-dependent affirmative action baby, they still know in their gut that, in this new world, he is better than they are. He is a good father while many of them are not. He wears suits to his job while they wear overalls, if they’re lucky enough to have a job at all. His wife tells them that they shouldn’t be feeding their children certain foods, and they hate her for it—not because they think she’s wrong, but because they know she’s right.”

Read on >



Charles Monette

“Clouds”

Monkey’s Cloak





sitting grey-bottomed gray o’er haloed ground

animated clouds’ withering look, nary a sound

Shelley’s. “islands on a dark blue sea”

mesmerizing azure pockets peak out a pongee

if they were vermillion, the sky would shut down


cartoon characters condense, play…skate on icy droplets

suspended in atmosphere’s far ranging orbit

all around cloud-hidden mystics hide

traipsing ‘round in moments with cloudy closed eyes

cumulus, cirrus, altostratus, nimbostratus vaporize


Read on>>>>



Lawrence Klepp Reviews

Sully

in

SCREENplay





Clint Eastwood’s Sully tells the story of Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, the pilot who became a national hero in January 2009 when, a few minutes after taking off from La Guardia Airport, his plane ran into a flock of birds, both engines failed, and, with great sangfroid and skill, he managed to bring it precariously down on the icy waters of the Hudson River just off the West Side of Manhattan, saving the lives of all 155 passengers and the crew.


The movie takes its time getting there, but it finally does a good job of re-creating those tense moments. Its problem is that the tense moments take ten minutes. So to fill the rest of its running time, it relies on flashbacks and aftermaths and tries hard to extract drama out of the grilling that Sully (Tom Hanks) and his co-pilot (Aaron Eckhart) are subjected to afterward by officials of the National Transportation Safety Board. The premise behind their relentless questions is that he should have followed proper procedures and tried to return to La Guardia, or divert to Newark, instead of risking a river landing. The imperturbable Sully has little trouble demonstrating that it couldn’t have been done. We now know that the actual NTSB officials weren’t nearly as inquisitorial as they’re portrayed here, and that the inquiry took place months, not days, after the incident. But movies need villains, and the federal functionaries function as one.


It does allow the film to raise some interesting questions about what happens to an authentic (and modest) hero in our legalistic-bureaucratic society.

Read on>>>>



 

Passages

Kirk Douglas

Sponsored by the oldest furniture store in New England 

https://www.facebook.com/finefurniturenaturally

Hours M-F 10-5 Sat 10-4  (802) 257 7166




Kirk Douglas is 100 years old today


When I first came to Hollywood, the blacklist was just starting, and they were having hearings in Washington. What most people don't know is the judge of these hearings himself was later convicted of misappropriation. 'Spartacus' helped break the blacklist, because Spartacus was a real character.


What would my parents think about America if they arrived here today? Would they even want to come? I wonder.


My first job was on Broadway. Then I went into the Navy. When I came out of the Navy, I went back to Broadway and a friend of mine, Lauren Bacall, was in Hollywood filming with Humphrey Bogart. She told one of her producers I was great in my play, and he saw it and cast me in 'The Strange Love of Martha Ivers'.


Virtue is not photogenic. What is it to be a nice guy? To be nothing, that's what. A big fat zero with a smile for everybody.


If you want to know about a man you can find out an awful lot by looking at who he married.


Cancer does give you a new rejuvenation. I know what it's like to be down. I lost a couple of good friends - Larry Hagman and Nick Ashford - who had the same type of cancer that I did, and that makes you think.


My four sons all knew I was a Jew, but they were allowed to be whatever they wanted to be. The only thing important to me was that they be good people who help other people, because all religion should try to make you a better person and a more caring person. Whenever religion does that for you, it's a good religion.


People are composed of many things, and in my work, what influences me is the complexity of people - the chiaroscuro of dark and light. When I play a strong guy, I try to find, where is he weak? And, conversely, when I play a weak guy, where is he strong?


I came from abject poverty. There was nowhere to go but up.




Not Quite Daily

See more MM Kizi at  Story Page & https://mmkizi.org


International Caption It Competition




A 4th Series of Images

If you like MM Kizi consider buying her new book

Lily the Cowboy HERE




Quizzes

Current Quiz #3


What is the collective pronoun for

  



a group of bureaucrats?


More Quizzes>>>


Image Notes — Dec 7

Holly and Ivy




Cultural background


Holly and ivy have been a mainstay of British Christmas decoration for church use since at least the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, when they were mentioned regularly in churchwardens’ accounts (Roud 2004). Holly and ivy also figure in the lyrics of the "Sans Day Carol". The music was first published by Cecil Sharp. Sir Henry Walford Davies wrote a popular choral arrangement that is often performed at the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols and by choirs around the world.


European Holly was sacred to druids who associated it with the winter solstice, and for Romans, holly was considered the plant of Saturn.


European Holly has always traditionally had a strong association with Christmas. Henry VIII wrote a love song Green groweth the holly which alludes to holly and ivy resisting winter blasts and not changing their green hue So I am and ever hath been Unto my lady true.


Hone's 1823 Ancient Mysteries Described, which lists the carol's title as mentioned above, also describes (p 94) a British Museum manuscript: The same volume contains a song on the Holly and the Ivy which I mention because there is an old Carol on the same subject still printed. The MS begins with,


Nay, my nay, hyt shal not be I wys,

Let holy hafe the maystry, as the maner ys:

Holy stond in the hall, faire to behold,

Ivy stond without the dore, she ys ful sore acold,

Nay, my nay etc

Holy and hys mery men, they dawnseyn and they syng,

Ivy and hur maydyns, they wepen and they wryng.

Nay, my nay etc'


The Holly and the Ivy is also related to an older carol described by Sharp as: "The Contest of the Ivy and the Holly", a contest between the traditional emblems of woman and man respectively.


Holly stands in the hall, fair to behold:

Ivy stands without the door, she is full sore a cold.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Holly and his merry men, they dance and they sing,

Ivy and her maidens, they weep and they wring.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Ivy hath chapped fingers, she caught them from the cold,

So might they all have, aye, that with ivy hold.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Holly hath berries red as any rose,

The forester, the hunter, keep them from the does.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Ivy hath berries black as any sloe;

There come the owl and eat him as she go.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Holly hath birds a fair full flock,

The nightingale, the popinjay, the gentle laverock.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.

Good ivy, what birds hast thou?

None but the owlet that cries how, how.

Nay, ivy, nay, it shall not be I wis;

Let holly have the mastery, as the manner is.



Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


The New Subject Matter, A Problem OF Transcendence

  




Christian Renaissance art dealt with transcendent images. The Resurrection, the Ascension, the Baptism — these images were uplifting. Tintoretto, Reubens, Piero, Raphael, and Michelangelo had their imagery clearly cut out. Live and death, heaven and hell, were depicted in subjects like the Virgin Birth, the Crucifixion, the Resurrection, and the Last Judgement. Transcendence was built in; it was often almost literal.

Veronese, Poussin, and Puvis de Chavannes dealt with mythology and allegory, still an attempt to work with heroic and transcendent subject matter.

In surrealism, transcendence occurs when one shifts from the conscious object tot he subconscious.

Impressionism, in dealing with the common man and common objects used in everyday life, is no longer heroic or transcendent in terms of specific objects and ideas. Transcendence is transferred from subject matter (the object) to the actual paint itself.

This leas to modernism — as exemplified by Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko [Illus.]— in which paint and transcendence are merged, and the object has disappeared. The subject matter is now the fusion of transcendence and paint.

This fusion resulted in a distancing from emotion, and encouraged a cool dispassionate art, in which sentiment, romanticism, and passion were dismissed.

The current return to representation art brings with it new subject matter, as strong reaction to the formalist and modernist past, and a reintroduction to emotion, through the artist’s personal statement and mythology. This sets the stage for a new transcendence.




Now, here, this!  Dec 7


Short & Long-term forecasts





There is a useful on-line resource which tracks real-time lightning strikes here

http://www.lightningmaps.org/




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



Taurus 1

The Image: A clear mountain stream

Keynote: The pure uncontaminated and spontaneous expression of one’s own nature

Keyword: Its Own Nature


Taurus 2

The Image: An electrical storm

Keynote: The cosmic power able to transform all the factors of natural existence

Keyword: The Visitation


Taurus 3

The Image: Natural steps lead to a lawn of clover in bloom

Keynote: The gradual expansion of individual consciousness after a fecundating experience

Keyword: Natural fulfillment


Taurus 4

The Image: The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow

Keynote: Riches that come as result of linking the celestial and earthly nature

Keyword: Communion


Taurus 5

The Image: A widow at an open grave [Illus.]

Keynote: The impermanence of all material and social bonds

Keyword: Discard the past




Image groups comprise a 5-fold sequence

(1° to 15° TAURUS in Scene 3 ‘SUBSTANTIATION’

in Act 1 of 4, Differentiation)


FOOD INQ

This Page Is Under Construction


  



A new column about Food is under construction, no peeking!


 

Photos of the Day


Open Land, Dummerston Vermont

&

Black Mountain