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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Contributors To Vermont Views Magazine


Wayne London, M.D.


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Photograph by Vermont Views

This page is sponsored by Neil Taylor "The Blind Masseur"

his page is sponsored by Neil Taylor "The Blind Masseur"


Special Feature

St. Kilda

Island at the edge of Imagination


St Kilda (Scottish Gaelic: Hiort) is an isolated archipelago 64 kilometres (40 mi) west-northwest of North Uist in the North Atlantic Ocean. It contains the westernmost islands of the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The largest island is Hirta, whose sea cliffs are the highest in the United Kingdom, and three other islands (Dùn, Soay and Boreray) were also used for grazing and seabird hunting. The islands are administratively a part of the Comhairle nan Eilean Siar local authority area.


The origin of the name St Kilda is a matter of conjecture. The islands' human heritage includes numerous unique architectural features from the historic and prehistoric periods, although the earliest written records of island life date from the Late Middle Ages. The medieval village on Hirta was rebuilt in the 19th century, but the influences of religious zeal, illnesses brought by increased external contacts through tourism, and the First World War all contributed to the island's evacuation in 1930. The story of St Kilda has attracted artistic interpretations, including Michael Powell's film The Edge of the World and an opera.


St Kilda may have been permanently inhabited for at least two millennia, the population probably never exceeding 180 (and certainly no more than 100 after 1851). The entire remaining population was evacuated from Hirta (the only inhabited island) in 1930. Currently, the only year-round residents are military personnel; a variety of conservation workers, volunteers and scientists spend time there in the summer months.


The oldest structures on St Kilda are the most enigmatic. Large sheepfolds lie inland from the existing village at An Lag Bho'n Tuath (English: the hollow in the north) and contain curious 'boat-shaped' stone rings, or 'settings'. Soil samples suggest a date of 1850 BC, but they are unique to St Kilda, and their purpose is unknown. In Gleann Mòr, (north-west of Village Bay beyond Hirta's central ridge), there are 20 'horned structures', essentially ruined buildings with a main court measuring about 3 by 3 metres (10 by 10 ft), two or more smaller cells and a forecourt formed by two curved or horn-shaped walls. Again, nothing like them exists anywhere else in Britain or Europe, and their original use is unknown. Also in Gleann Mòr is Taigh na Banaghaisgeich, the 'Amazon's House'. As Martin (1703) reported, many St Kilda tales are told about this female warrior.


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Weekly Feature

The Wild Mountain Thyme



O the summer time has come

And the trees are sweetly blooming

And wild mountain thyme

Grows around the purple heather.

Will you go, lassie, go?


Chorus And we'll all go together, To pull wild mountain thyme, All around the purple heather. Will you go, lassie, go?


I will build my love a tower,

By yon clear crystal fountain,

And on it I will pile,

All the flowers of the mountain.

Will you go, lassie, go?


I will range through the wilds

And the deep land so dreary

And return with the spoils

To the bower o' my dearie.

Will ye go lassie go ?


If my true love she'll not come,

Then I'll surely find another,

To pull wild mountain thyme,

All around the purple heather.

Will you go, lassie, go?



Mountain Thyme", also known as "Purple Heather" and "Will You Go Lassie, Go", is a folk song, written by William McPeake, a native of Belfast, Northern Ireland and first recorded by McPeake in 1957. It is often mistakenly believed to be a traditional song, but the copyright is held by English Folk Dance and Song Society Publications, who published it for McPeake. It was first recorded by Francis McPeake in 1957, and has since been covered by numerous artists.


The song is commonly described as a variant of "The Braes of Balquhidder" by Robert Tannahill (1774-1810), which was named after the braes, or hills, of Balquhidder near Loche

arnhead, and has a similar lyric and tune. For example, the first two verses of "The Braes of Balquhidder" are:

Let us go, lassie, go

Tae the braes o' Balquhidder

Where the blaeberries grow

'Mang the bonnie bloomin' heather

Whar the deer and the rae

Lichtly bounding thegither

Sport the lang summer day

On the braes o' Balquhidder

I will twine thee a bower

By the clear silver fountain

And I'll cover it o'er

Wi' the flowers o' the mountain

I will range through the wilds

And the deep glens sae dreary

And return wi' their spoils

To the bower o' my dearie


This original melody is heard in one of the opening scenes of the movie, The Woman in Green (1945). The film's central character, Sherlock Holmes, played by Basil Rathbone, is playing the tune on a violin as Doctr Watson interrupts him.

If somehow, you can’t remember the tune, take your pick of recording artists:-

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Publisher’s Challenge

Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here

Selected responses will appear in this column.

Publisher’s Challenge


Respond to the current challenge by sending your contribution to the publisher here


Selected responses will appear in this column.

Challenge #4

May 28, 2014


Truth or Dare


“Did you ever have a Barbie or a GI Joe*?”



In 250 words or less let’s have an honest memoir.


*Okay, if you had a Ken, tell us about your Ken.



View Contributions to this

and other Challenges


Guest Article


An excerpt from the forthcoming title:

Magnificent Obesity: My Search for Wellness, Voice and Meaning in the Second Half of Life,

published August 26 from Hatherleigh Press/Random House.


Martha M Moravec


When the shock of a heart attack at age 55 accelerates my midlife crisis into a nightmare of phobias and panic attacks, my doctor suggests that I ask my friends to organize themselves into a support team to help me through the trauma. Sadly, it occurs to me that with the exception of one best friend, I have lost touch with all the friends and social groups I had relied upon during my 35 years in Brattleboro.


So you see, there had always been a gang. But not at this time, not now. Entire casts of friends, acquaintances, and extras had disbanded; I had moved on or they had moved on; we had separated as a matter of course or blithely drifted apart. At the time of my heart attack, after a year and a half of unemployment and mostly solitary writing, I was working at another nonprofit, mission-driven organization with a wide array of services and programs but only two staff: the executive director and me.


My solution was to try rounding up one of the old gangs, members of the bar crowd from 30 years before who still lived in the area, people I occasionally ran into on the street and occasionally celebrated birthdays with, all women, some younger than me, some older, some married, some not.


I called the elder, the one we might consider the leader of the pack, whose thriving pub on Main Street had supplied us with employment and a stomping ground as bartenders, waitresses, and cooks. When I asked her to put out the word about my situation and perhaps organize a lineup of gatherings and good times, I should have sensed trouble in her hesitation and slight befuddlement. I did not, however, because I was having a vision of something so natural I assumed that everyone would spontaneously and joyously share it.


I was thinking of community. When the author Dan Buettner set out with a National Geographic team of demographers, anthropologists, and medical researchers to identify where in the world people lived longest, and why, he concluded that even more than the plant-based diets of the numerous centenarians living in what he called the Blue Zones, it was their faith-based communities that kept them vital and engaged past the age of 100.

Longevity in the Blue Zone begins with healthy, moderate eating; regular physical activity; and regular, moderate drinking but it ends with a greater emphasis on values reinforced by prevailing behaviors within the culture: an established means of relieving stress, a sense of purpose in life, a strong sense of belonging, a commitment to putting families first and keeping them close, and the luck or inclination to be living in an environment that makes a healthy lifestyle possible.


Invariably, every city on every list of Best Places to Retire has a manageable, vibrant, or walkable downtown. The proliferation of niche communities, co-housing options, and village models indicates that those in a position to plan for retirement are not planning to retire in splendid isolation. Nor should they be. Studies reveal that the more friends a woman has, the less likely she is to develop physical ailments or depression as she ages, and indeed, another trend in retirement living options appears to be the readiness of divorced, widowed, or never married women to pool resources and move in with each other.


For me, Dr. Sczesny’s suggestion conjured images of housewives in ancient Greece gathering for gossip at the well, medieval maidens singing chansons while weaving at the loom, American frontierswomen congregating under the pretext of a quilting bee, contemporary women “doing” lunch or seeking aid and comfort in online health and wellness communities. They are images of women telling their stories, their very own, private stories, finding the words, speaking the words and experiencing those words as received, witnessed, and understood.

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Non Profit of the Month

Farming Connections, Inc


Farming Connections, Inc., is a non- profit located in Guilford, Vermont.


Our small farm has been involved for over a decade in developing structured, safe activities for our farm animals to spend time with clients to teach kids the ins and outs of getting along with others.


Our therapy animals provide honest, non-judgmental feedback to our clients. These animal teachers help our clients develop skills in a host of critical areas. 


Our farm animals emphasize the value of honest communication and the need for gentleness and respect towards others.  A keen desire to be close to an animal provides powerful motivation to learn new ways of interacting with others.


Our Animal Mediated Therapy © program has already helped many children. We would like to be able to provide services to more children.  We need your help to make this possible.


You can make a tax deductible donation on-line at www.farmingconnections.org   


Thank you in advance for your well wishes and your generous support.


Gail E. Lilly, RN, M.Ed.

President/Founder

Farming Connections, Inc.

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Vermont Diary


Performance anxiety, god

Friday I went down to the soup kitchen early since I was leading the cooking, our ace cook Ruth being elsewhere, and I had done it half dozen times before but there was the awkward report of 60lbs of pork, however well defrosted. So I got in at 7 and lit the ovens.


My friend Bob came in at nine, having already attended another function, and carved from 9 thru 11 non stop. Later he reported: Numbers were something like 66 sit down / 30+ take out with 70+ families; add in day care you're closing in on 200.


And we had fun with the pork producing it 6 ways:


Ribs

w. the new black beans [a hit]

sweet & sour

pork with barbecue sauce

pork with pork


and the unnamed wonder of the day: pork with applesauce with beaucoup reduced rhubarb [also a hit]


Our CSA had given us two generous bags of rhubarb, and this reduced and added to a dozen cans of applesauce, plus pork, was a daring dish. It’s not even vaguely like cooking in pans on a stove top, but it is slow cooking with what quality ingredients we have, and served to people who we treat like citizens, not second class people.


I like walking home after since I am tired, but it is like a meditation — perceptions come which are otherwise crowded out, and they are often rich things, and as often like jewels I discarded at another time.


Arriving home, a joke! My wife said she had bought us something on this 88 degree day, and it was a turkey!


God is great! Or if you like a fraternal God, what a brother!

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Monthly Feature


William Hays, print maker


A visit with William Hays in his studio in Brattleboro. To accompany this article the current print he is working on now appears in a 7 stage slide show at Studio 3, click the link and press ‘play slideshow’.


I had previously interviewed the subject for an hour on January 21, 2011 almost exactly 3 years ago. Readers might like to read the transcript here. Then we progressed from art to the universe and all that.


This time we conspired to be more disciplined and attempt to illustrate a print in progress and something of the nature of the art.


Where better to start than with the inks themselves? An immediate question I had was if the materials the artist used were generally the same as had Gutenberg (c. 1395 – February 3, 1468)? And they were. Stand oil, I discovered, is a base for the ink made from linseed oil thickened by heating in an oxygen deprived chamber, and linseed comes from flax and is a good drying oil for a process known as polymerizing.

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Selected Letters


Mac Gander

Jun 29, 2014


In response to your Diary piece on dress code, first Phil your piece was great, with just the right kind of humor this sort of thing requires. I don't know that the issue will go away--in fact, Woody said that the school board would look at it, and I know at least five very smart young women who plan to follow up. What Olga didn't get in her story, which I'm sure was hard to report, was that the initial design of the protest, which actually came from a very politically savvy circle of friends, got hijacked along the way by some kids who wanted to have more fun than that, and did not necessarily understand the principle of ironic non-violent protest.


Now my sense is that these smart girls will keep the issue alive--if only because fashion mores have changed more quickly than the code, and they're actually just wearing the clothes you can buy at the mall--there are not alternatives, it's like you'd have to have your tops and shorts special-ordered if you wanted to fit the code. (My own daughter carries a sweater with her, just in case she gets caught by the border police.)


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Monkey’s Cloak


Globe Skimmer

Laura Momaney



Walk with me a bit, lend me the comfort of your companionship

Cover me with soft kisses and make me dance 

Teach me a lesson, show me grace

Fold me in your arms against fate's locked embrace 


My heart's a weeping widow, I wouldn't change it much

 It bends beautiful, like gossamer weeping willow

Branches dance in the wind, dispersing dancing dust 

 

Untether my soul and lead me astray

Take it to the street, let me play. I beg of you

Take me down with you

Teach me to swim or let me drown with you 

  

Drowning men chant two words, 'Save me!' 

Beggar men, they know three, 'Blessed are we!' 


 The Gods up there rolling dice, laugh at me and my latest plight  

One roll brings you in on dirty angel wings, next roll takes you out again 

Both rolls scare me


The first one made me sing, the second brought me poetry

Both caught my heart off guard, both rolls hit me hard

 Knocked me around

 Two rolls dropped my knees to the ground. 


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Column Untitled Work


Snake Skins 

Mac Gander

Jul 22, 2014


My wife has been confined from her usual athleticism by a broken foot, and we’re on a college break, too, so she has directed an orgy of housecleaning, years of accumulated boxes and so on coming down from the attic and up from the basement in this home we have made together for so many years now. Our older daughter, just graduated from college, has been helping sometimes, and last night as we were all going through boxes and watching Croatia play Brazil, she found a ream of old photographs in a box I have probably not noticed for two decades. She handed them to me, and I could see that they were what are left of the photos I took in Manila during the People’s Revolution in 1986.


It was impossible for a mediocre photographer like me to take any good shot of the thing, in that pre-digital era when film and developing cost real money, so you only could take a few shots, no selfies. The crowd was huge, four million strong hanging out like a block party on the broad avenue called EDSA, and my focus was poor. It was a cheap camera, a Pentax 1000 I had picked up at a discount place in Kowloon along with a small manual typewriter, and while I had a zoom lens, it was not a very good lens. As I looked at the photographs it felt impossible than any of it had ever mattered. It did, of course, but the time is so distant now that meaning has been threshed from it in my repeated revisitings over the years. I think “hypostatized” is the technical term.


Still, in the mix of photos I also found two snake skins—collected at a different point but somehow mixed in with the photos—and also the one photo I ever had of Ghani, the Marcos hit-man I met at an Ihaw-Ihaw the day after the revolution. And it was wonderful, on this misty Vermont evening, how quickly the photograph of Ghani leapt to my memory and accorded with it, the thin pencil mustache, the smirk that substituted for a smile, the red bandana worn pirate-style, the dark aviator sunglasses like a third-string CIA operative in the Vietnam era.


I once had a pair of those glasses, too, smoky gray, and I used to wear them at night when I wandered barefoot on the Manhattan streets when I was 18. I would walk from Riverside Drive up to Broadway and then down along the avenue watching the whores and pimps and dealers, and then I would walk back home again on West End. I don’t know what I was trying to prove, or what any of this means now.  I was just young and I felt edgy sometimes. But the two snake skins with the photos seemed salutary. How many skins have I shed, over these many years, and which still cling to me? What more do I have to shed?

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Column 4our writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Art of independent study

Matti Salminen

Jul 26, 2014

Writing for Vermont Views has afforded me something, which does not, necessarily, come to writers easily.  I am, in writing for Phil, building a work history in publication.  4our will be the third column I’ve worked on for Vermont Views.  In this column, I intend to keep a theme of self-education, but I will not stick to it strictly.

Writing has become the focal point in my studies since I first began blogging two years ago.  I’ve managed to turn my life around through writing practice.  It has opened doors for me that for so long I thought would be closed forever.

Learning should serve to broaden one’s horizons.  It should aid a student in leading a more fulfilling life.  Included in life fulfillment are eight dimensions of wellness.  These eight dimensions of wellness are as follows: environmental, physical, occupational, financial, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual. Seeking independent learning seems, on its surface, to be less constructive in occupational and financial wellness than a formal college education.  So let’s hammer this issue out right from the start.

One of the things I recommend first for anyone pursuing self-education is to learn a trade.  In regards to the eight dimensions of wellness, occupational and financial fulfillment will be improved by learning a trade.  However, study skills will also be improved by learning a trade.  Gaining hands-on experience in a trade will help a person to understand how knowledge aids skill—and proficiency.

Also noteworthy, learning a trade can show a person how much learning from books will assist their quest in independent study; and how much learning should come from getting their feet wet…by gaining real life experience.

Bicycle maintenance is possibly the trade I’m most knowledgeable and skilled in.  I went to a trade school in Colorado Springs to learn to do general bicycle repair, and wheel building.  Having this educational background helped me to have work at a non-profit bicycle shop in Burlington.  Working as a bicycle mechanic, daily, cemented the skills I developed at school. Learning a trade will broaden horizons, however, it isn’t sufficient to have the equivalent learning of a college degree.  Other pursuits, regarding my education, have been crucial to my search for independence along my path of self directed learning.

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Column Articulate

Leadership

Kate Anderson

Jul 15, 2014

      

I tend to think leadership asks us to be willing (though it's not prescribed) to also take on the fool's role.  By that I mean Hamlet as fool.   Push, confront, place it out there, demand evidence of some good grappling with the grand what ifs.   Failure?  Yes, and of course, to be expected. 


Let things be muddied and watch the joy and vigor by which they sort themselves.  

An arts district.  A name is a rose,  is a rose.  It is wise to call the question, is it important, useful, good to designate such such, that which is.  Are we to petition the State for formal designation of an Arts District, a Cultural District?  Brattleboro is that already.  And an arts campus, and a de facto arts colony.   Or, it can be that we are no more an arts town than a sports town or a retail haven.


What  does matter is for us to see how we function.  Take  the engine apart.  Look at all the pieces. Tinker.   How do they work with one another.  Oops ?? Did we just innovate to another compound?   Ah yes, and now we have Worpsewede, Bloomsbury.   And we can call on a fertile fertile field.   And we might name it, too. It doesn't matter.  The field yields its own harvest


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This column is sponsored by Friends of the Sun


Column Open Mind

Ex-Felons Automatically Have The Right To Vote in Vermont!

Offie Wortham

Jul 17, 2014

If you ask the average person if they think a convicted felon has the right to vote, most will tell you that they do not believe an ex-felon can vote. This is not true. Anyone who is not in jail, and who is not on parole can vote and hold public office in Vermont. The person does not have to file any kind of a petition or seek a pardon. Released felons are not routinely informed of their right to vote in this state, and often believe—incorrectly—that they can never vote again. In Vermont the person never loses their right.


The laws vary greatly from state to state. A person convicted of theft in New Jersey automatically regains the right to vote after release from prison, even if they are on parole. In New Mexico such an offender is denied the vote for the rest of their life unless they can secure a pardon from the governor.


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Column Nurturing Nature

Air

Tasneem Tawfeek

Jul 31, 2014


...let's take a closer look at the issue of deforestation. This issue is a major concern, not only in the United States, but all over the world. According to livescience.com, "an estimated 18 million acres of forest are lost each year." It is safe to say that deforestation has taken a major toll on the Earth's vast forests, which ultimately results in damage to the quality of the environment, which, of course, has many negative effects. For starters, one of the biggest impacts of deforestation is the loss of habitats for millions of species. A majority of the Earth's animals actually depend on  and live in forests, and unfortunately, do not survive in the wild because of the loss of their habitat due to deforestation. In addition to this, deforestation alters the climate severely. Soil makes up a large amount of a forest, and needs to be protected by the shade of the trees in order to thrive and prosper within the forest. However, because of deforestation, the soil quickly dries out because of too much exposure to the sun's rays. Without the trees in place to protect the soil, forests can eventually become deserts. Also, with the loss of trees, harmful substances, such as the greenhouse gases, cannot be absorbed and are released into the atmosphere, resulting in global warming.  As if these issues are not enough, I simply cannot imagine not being able to, one day, rely on the beauty of endless forests as I seek to reflect upon other issues of our world.


In addition, pollution is not any newcomer to this world. It has been an ongoing environmental issue for years, and continues to grow at a rapid pace. Air, water, and even soil pollution are just a few of the many forms of pollution that affect our surroundings.  Air pollution proves to be the most dangerous for the environment. The harmful smoke released from vehicles, chimneys, factories, or the burning of wood, have played a big role in damaging the environment. The sulfur dioxide emitted from the smoke causes global warming and acid rain to occur, and as a result, has increased temperatures and has caused droughts to take place as well. With these harmful gases in the air health issues such as asthma and lung cancer are becoming more and more evident in people. Not only this, water pollution has greatly affected many species living on Earth. Toxic wastes that are dumped into various bodies of water have caused the water to become contaminated with chemicals, leading to the deaths of many sea creatures. Lastly, soil pollution, which takes place because of human activities, has a great impact on the environment.


The soil on Earth is gradually becoming more unfit for plants to grow in due to the use of pesticides and insecticides. Because the plants do not grow properly, soil erosion takes place. Those blue skies and oceans that we value a great deal for our own pleasure should be better maintained as they certainly contribute to our own well being.

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Column Old Lady Blog

Foraging

Toni Ortner

Jul 13, 2014


According to the American College Dictionary foraging is: the seeking or obtaining of food, act of searching for provisions of any kind, to wander in search of supplies, to hunt or search about. This is not a word that is in common use unless one is taking a course that teaches how to survive in the wilderness by eating lamb’s ear.

Nevertheless, if one believes in the predictions of Porter Stansberry & Associates Investment Research, one has begun to forage to survive. Porter Stansberry and Associates are unknown to the general public but well known to those who have enough money to make financial investments in the stock market or buy precious metals.  Although many regard the predictions of this firm as being radical or un-American, it is interesting to see what this firm says. This firm believes that the United States is about to see a major collapse of our national monetary system due to government debt that we can never pay.


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Column in between

Julia Ferrari

May 27, 2014



Every time I begin to feel lost or overwhelmed, I take a moment to slow down and look outside of myself to see other lives around me and to reflect on how each of our lives comes together, despite problems, to allow us choices— to live this life to reach our potential & meet our challenges. I believe each of us carries with us a direction, with lessons to learn and fires to light within ourselves. Many paths stretch out in front of us as we start our lives, some are painful and others are fulfilling but they each can bring us closer to our interior life. We don’t always take those forays into the unknown, those roads we can’t see the end of, because what we don’t know can scare us, and fear can be a strong entangler … However, through paying attention to our intuition, that inner voice that nudges us in certain directions (if we listen close enough) we can catch a glimpse of a possibility that is not mapped out.


For me, art was one of the first interests I followed as a youth, despite being discouraged by a kindergarten teacher for not measuring up, and it continued to press at me at the edges of my life. I remember being twenty-four and not knowing what I wanted to do as a career, there were so many possibilities and no clear path to my identity, it seemed. Painting, calligraphy, and poetry became threads that started to be woven. Then, while living in Boston, I responded to an ad in the “Real Paper” involving letterpress and the small press movement, and that began, most unexpectedly the direction of my life.

Within the context of the hand printed books I was encountering, printmaking began to interest me, but then one day I saw a title page—as a shape, not just as information, and the world of typographic design opened up in front of me.


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Column Beer & Bangers

On the Road: A Visit to J.D McCliment’s Pub and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Terri Kneipp

Jun 30, 2014


The Beer & Bangers crew has been adventurous venturing far from their usual confines of the Big B into such foreign territory as Putney and Chester, VT.  The crew chooses locations based on the possibilities of either a good selection of brews and grub from past personal experience, word of mouth or sheer luck of stumbling upon an establishment. Not all who participate enjoy beer, so other beverages are explored including wine, cocktails and good ole ice tea being a connoisseur of the latter myself still learning the finer nuances of the heartier brews.


J.D. McCliment’s Pub (http://www.jdmcclimentspub.com/) in Putney is well established with a steady stream of customers, both local and visitors. Along with a casual, indoor dining area with a pool table upstairs, weather permitting there is an inviting outdoor deck. The beer selection was minimal with mostly bottled domestic beers with a Shale being one exception which was excellent. Ice tea was freshly brewed and decent, nothing exciting but fine. Now, the meat of the meal, so to speak, received mixed reviews. The Turkey Burger was thought good with the Ruben being perfectly acceptable. After that there was debate, one member thought the Fish and Chips fine, while one indicated the fish was over cooked. The Bratwurst was passable, but would not be had again with the Corned Beef being too salty. Overall the atmosphere was pleasant with adequate service, albeit slow which seems to be the rule in local pubs rather than the exception. The crew agreed they might to go back to enjoy an evening outside with lively conversation and a beverage of choice where food wasn’t the focus but accessible. It was noted that an authentic Scottish pub it was not; for that, one need only head to Chester.


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Column Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Bathroom Stories

Jeri Rose

Jun 8, 2014


               Excretion is something people have large privacy issues about. Everyone must do it, but a huge majority in US society seems to think crap is disgusting. Now I agree that it is unpleasant to step in dog shit and getting it off one’s shoe to end the misery of being followed by that redolent, unmistakable odor causes one considerable trouble especially if one is in a pair of shoes that will be ruined if simply washed under a faucet. We have such shame about this body function that young people, in the beginning of courtship, will not do number two in a bathroom in a home where the other is present. Homes are now built so that partners do not use the same bathroom due to disgust and shame at having any awareness that the other has a bowel.  A reality TV show “Flipping Out” takes place where in a home-office, the workers are not allowed to use the bathroom to have a bowel movement. Presumably, they have to get into a car and go to the nearest public place that has a bathroom that will flush these offensive solids that are prohibited in that boss’s home.


               I applaud the Jewish religion that has a prayer thanking God for a good defecation. I am of the opinion that our finicky attitude toward natural functions in general retards our growth to maturity. Thus I am telling bathroom stories, memories of memorable occasions around this necessary natural endgame of eating. I am generally of a high minded disposition, thinking about God, the origins of humans, the meaning of life, so I write recognizing this may surprise those who have read other stories or poems that I have written for me to be going so low as to concern myself with this topic. I write with an expectation that some of my experiences will be familiar and part of something funny we all share whether we feel shame or reduced for engaging in this bodily function or not. I know that everyone has some vivid memory of accidents and triumphs around this process.


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Column Chess

Phil Innes

Jun 2, 2014

Guest article by Grandmaster Susan Polgar 


This interview was originally published in my www.chesscafe.com column in August 2003. It was the most emotional interview I have ever conducted. The original title was A Man with a Noble Cause. The Mission: Help Chess (Scholastic and Women's Chess)

Susan Polgar: Why are you so passionate about changing the face of chess in America?


Paul Truong: Well, it is a very good question and one I don’t think I have ever talked about before. It started from circumstances I had to deal with throughout the early part of my life. Growing up in Saigon, Vietnam, I became a chess icon at a very young age. I won the first National Junior (under 21) Championship when I was only 5 years old, unexpectedly. All of a sudden, I became a sensation, a child prodigy. I defended this title for the next three years. At the age of 8½, I stunned the country by winning my first national championship and defended it successfully for four consecutive years. My celebrity status skyrocketed. I was invited by the late President Marcos of the Philippines to attend the Fischer vs. Karpov match in Manila in 1975 (which of course never took place). I also qualified for the World Junior (under 21) Championship in Manila that same year. At that time, I thought I had a chance to showcase my talent on a world stage. Then, my life came crumbling down. The communists from North Vietnam took over my country on April 30, 1975. I was no longer allowed to travel. I was no longer allowed to play chess freely. Since my father was working for the US Embassy prior to the fall of South Vietnam, my family was singled out. They considered us traitors. For the next four years, my father had to constantly be in hiding. Otherwise, he would have been executed. The new government no longer allowed me to train in chess. The only thing they allowed me to do was to defend my National Championship, which I did successfully until April 30, 1979, the fourth anniversary of the fall of Saigon. On that day, my father and I escaped by boat through an underground network, leaving my mother and young brother behind. They would never survive this dangerous escape. Our hope was to be able to get out first and bring them out later through another channel. To make the long story short, we faced death many times. How we survived was a miracle in itself.


SP: So what exactly happened?


<extracts> Read More ➤


Column Energetics  Energy policy & practice for the twenty-first century

George Harvey

US and World Energy News, Jun 13


¶ Another $15billion ready — Buffett


World:

¶   Chinese demand for natural gas is expected to almost double in the next five years as the country aims to use cleaner fuels to clear its cities’ smog-filled skies, according to the International Energy Agency. [Financial Times]


¶   Energia has announced that they have commenced operations at its newest wind farm in County Tipperary, supplying energy to homes and businesses across Ireland. The €19 million Hollyford wind farm has the capacity to produce 9 MW of renewable electricity. [Siliconrepublic.com]


¶   Iberdrola has pledged to invest $5 billion in Mexico’s energy sector through 2018 under an agreement with the Federal Electricity Commission. Iberdrola already has more than 5.2 GW in operating nameplate capacity – wind farms and combined cycle natural gas plants. [Recharge]


¶    Expanding its international and renewable energy footprints, GE Energy Financial Services invested in a 32-MW solar PV project in Japan. GE Energy Financial Services’ plan is to invest over $1 billion annually in renewable energy projects worldwide. [AltEnergyMag]


<extracts>  Read More ➤


Column O Citoyen!

Climate Change: Fear or Hope?

Robert Oeser

Jul 14, 2014

Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast Invitation


In July, the "Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast" will again take place on the fourth Friday of the month,  Friday, July 25,  2014 at the Gibson Aiken Center, downstairs, hosted by Senior Meals. Doors open at 7:30am.


The Topic for this month will be:   Climate Change:  Should we be Fearful? . . . Or Hopeful?  A discussion of some positive trends in energy use..

The presenter will be George Harvey, the General Factotum of the Green Energy Times - http://greenenergytimes.org/


=> Because we need to plan for  the number of people having  breakfast, please  RSVP by no later than Tuesday, July 22, by replying to <Robt.Oeser@gmail.com> -     (or call 518-505-9031 [c])

=> The breakfast, provided by Senior Meals will feature a Frittata,  fruit, yogurt, juice and coffee.  Cost is $6.00 for those under 60 years of age. ($3.50 is the suggested donation for those over 60 years.)

=> Brattleboro Time Traders may use one time credit hour to attend the breakfast, hosted by Brattleboro Senior Meals.


Read More ➤


Column Post Oil Solutions

“Gasland Part II”

Post Oil Solutions will screen the movie, “Gasland II” at its 4th Tuesday of the month Climate Change Café on Tuesday, July 22, 6:00 PM, in the Brooks Memorial Library Community Room

 

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be available.

 

In this explosive follow-up to his Oscar®-nominated film “Gasland”, filmmaker Josh Fox uses his trademark dark humor to take a deeper, broader look at the dangers of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, the controversial method of extracting natural gas and oil, now occurring on a global level (in 32 countries worldwide).


“Gasland Part II” shows how the stakes have been raised on all sides in one of the most important environmental issues facing our nation today. It declares that the gas industry's portrayal of natural gas as a clean and safe alternative to oil is a myth, and that hydrofracked wells inevitably leak over time, contaminating water and air, hurting families, and endangering the earth's climate with the potent greenhouse gas methane. In addition the film looks at how the powerful oil and gas industries are in Fox's words "contaminating our democracy".


For further information: Tim Stevenson, 802.869.2141, info@postoilsolutions.org.


Read More ➤


Column rape


Laurie Green

Jul 5, 2014

This column contains violent and sexual material



I am excruciatingly sad as I write this.  I feel helpless as a voice in what is a REAL 'war against women' in this country.  I have been so overwhelmed by all of the news stories involving rape, child sex rings, legislators attacking the basic rights of women and then the Supreme Court ruling in regard to Hobby Lobby.  I also feel incredible anger but it seems as though all the anger in the world does not help.  I just sobbed my head off this morning.  I was entirely wracked with sobs.  I could only just hold my head in my hands and let my body shake and let the tears and the anguish come roaring out.  What have I done that's made a difference?  My 8-year-old niece was in the other room.  She is a young girl who will grow up in the world that is currently being fashioned by groups of smug, largely white men.  I still sit here with tears in my eyes as I write this.  This is beyond a war, it is a vicious and calculated attempt to hold me down, hold my female friends down, hold down our young girls, hold down the men who actually care.  And one of the parts that just brings me to my knees is the women who are defending these actions as responsible and nothing to feel angry and anguished about.  I finally accept that a broad base of people just don't care about my body and my wish to make decisions that are about my physical and emotional safety.  And what I have to say to all of you screaming about your religious rights, keep your fucking hands off my civil rights.

<extracts> Read More ➤


Column The Great Adventure

The Feminine in the Twenty-first Century

Like A Girl

Terri Kneipp

Jul 1, 2014


Yes! Like A Girl


Wow. I feel remiss. Evidently I was supposed to feel responsible for the inappropriate ways men have ogled me since I was 12 or to think only girls should have to dress conservatively for school. This week has been full of stereotypical negative phrases, images and responsibilities about or toward girls and women being bandied about, discussed in multiple arenas, debated ad nauseam in other words, my mind is spinning. Between school dress codes to a broader discussion on modest dress to limiting phrases, let’s dive into the deep end.


Early in the week on a ladies forum, the talk turned to modest dress: what was appropriate, how to help men behave themselves, should cleavage be shown or not, etc. This in itself is a powder keg ready to start a maelstrom. My first thought was that it’s not my job to “help men” control their impulses; but, also that it was demeaning to men, assuming they couldn’t control themselves. Give the guys some credit: they all aren’t lecherous, leering dolts who are unable to be respectful using common decorum in every day life. Luckily, I found a video for Christian men from a Christian man (http://johnpavlovitz.com/2014/06/20/young-men-sex-and-urge-ownership-and-why-its-not-the-girls-problem/), so if you are not a Christian, you may not see an issue, that isn’t the point. My point is taking the responsibility for any action off of anyone other than the person who is committing the action. If a crime is committed, it should never be the victim’s fault.  If I choose to wear a tank top that shows a little cleavage, heaven forbid, because it is summer, I have an ample chest and it’s freaking hot and some man stares, that’s on him. I am not dressing a certain way to elicit a given response, but I am also not going to over react unless the behavior is obnoxious and intrusive. Being bundled from head to toe in puffy ski gear, I have had men make comments that weren’t appreciated and I dealt with them as any mature woman would, swiftly, clearly and leaving no doubt of my meaning. With that said, dressing fairly modestly is what works for me.


Read More ➤

This column is sponsored by Delectable Mountain Cloth

Column Natural Inclusivity

NATURAL INCLUSION FOR THE YOUNG OF HEART AND MIND

Alan Rayner

Apr 30, 2014


A WORD FROM THE WISE


INTRODUCTION


The imaginary conversation set out below shows how a ‘youngster’, i.e. anyone with a truly open mind and heart, could readily be helped by an experienced mentor to realize that everything in Nature is made of space and energy as distinct but mutually inclusive presences. This simple realization of what has been called ‘natural inclusion’ is denied by abstract logic and materialism, which is rooted in the assumption that space and matter are mutually exclusive or confining. This assumption damagingly and paradoxically discounts the infinite omnipresence and receptive influence of space from the evolution of the natural world and our human place within it.


THE CONVERSATION


YOUNGSTER:  What is the world made of?


MENTOR: It’s like this …most people might try to answer that question by describing some kind of substance or material, like ‘earth’ or ‘air’ or ‘fire’ or ‘water’  or some combination of these. But actually, when you think about it carefully, you will realise that the most basic kind of presence in the world is not really a substance at all, but has to be present for any kind of substance to exist. Can you imagine what this presence is – a presence that makes the existence of substance possible, but isn’t itself a substance? We need to think about this presence first. Where is this presence, and what does it feel like?


Read More ➤



Op Ed

a book about adoption and Moms.

The Op Ed writer is

Linda Whiton

Jun 2, 2014


She was due on November 28th and came on December 13th, St. Lucia’s day, day of light.  I lay in bed watching my clock, a loud click every time a minute passed, counting minutes between contractions for hours,  too scared to wake my brother up to bring me to the hospital.    But once my water broke I went into Mom’s room and she called Paul and off we went into the grey morning snow.


After sixteen hours of labor, after coming in and out of a fog in the delivery room I saw her head crown.  The medical team thought she might not fit through my birth canal so they increased the anesthetic and forced me to sleep at the final push.  She was born and removed from me.  I could hear her cry and I could hear them talking about her and saying how beautiful she was.  Dr. Shapiro leaned over me, congratulated me on a job well done and told me he was going to remove me from the room, not show her to me, not let us bond.  It was thought to be easier for both of us.  Several hours later I was moved into a room with two other women.  One woman‘s baby was born addicted to smack, the other’s was born premature with a damaged heart.  The doctors were trying to move him to Columbia Presbyterian.  Both women were in distress, my automatic, middle child, take care of everyone else, clicked in immediately and I brushed away attention to myself and helped the others.


After visiting hours the night  she was born, my eldest brother flirted his way past the nurses with flowers.  He came in my room and tossed my robe at me. “Come on, let’s go look at her” I got up out of bed, took his arm and we walked slowly down to the nursery where two babies lay in small tanks.  The first was the one pound preemie, tiny and tied with tubes and oxygen under his nose.  And the other was my large baby girl with lots of black hair and the look of a two month old: aware, conscious and alive.  Mike and I stared, she looked like a Whiton baby, the nurses remarked how beautiful she was and slow tears began to run out of both of our eyes.


<extracts> Read More ➤ including the side bar  which suggests ways you can help this project



  Real Food ! 


Nashville Hot Chicken

Mark Lee

Jul 24, 2014


This is my home made version of Nashville Hot Chicken. Brined for 12 hours in special salt/pepper seasoning and then soaked in Tabasco Buttermilk and egg, then dredged again in a spicy flour and pepper mix. I have a new respect for Nashville Hot Chicken. It's easier to just go get you some. Recipe available for those that really want to spend about 3 hours in the kitchen, but worth it if you like to cook. Read On and for More Reader’s Recipes ➤

Graphic Traffic

An orientation to illustration and illustrated books for writers

By Marlene O’Connor on Jan 16, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views

Street Dance – Flight, personal piece


Here are illustrations of Marlene’s work and she has also contributed notes on how to sensibly engage graphic artists, illustrators and publishers as a generous addition to orienting the writer to the subject.  

Read More

This column is sponsored by www.zephyrdesignsvt.com


Dec 28th, 2011

Photo Brooks House Fire


Things started quietly enough with normal amounts of snow but the people in the municipal building could hardly anticipate multiple disasters in 2011  

Read More


Kipling’s Questionnaire

Last Entry Mac Gander

Photo Rudyard Kipling at Naulakha near Brattleboro.


130 years ago in 1880/81 Rudyard Kipling completed the 26 question questionnaire. Kipling subsequently moved to Brattleboro and Dummerston, living here from 1892 to 1896.


At the time it is said that Kipling was known by more people in the world than was any other person. I would like to publish your own responses in Vermont Views Magazine to the very same questions Kipling answered.




Please add your answers below the 26 questions on the questionnaire page, or write in for a set of emailed questions.


Read More


StudioONE

Len Emery



The Project:


Goffstown Slaughterhouse



Here is a small representative sample of a fairly large project at a slaughterhouse in Goffstown.


The Photographer


Len Emery


"I come from an engineering background with all of its inflexibility and predefinition. Conversely, photography is often fleeting and very much undefined. I try to capture the image as it happens, the instant framed from my perspective for all to see my interpretation. I try to use the environment as an element of the image, allowing it to enhance and sometimes be the image. I then try to draw the viewer into the image as I was drawn in when I first saw it.


I am a pilot as well as a photographer and use my flying skills and camera together when doing contract aerial photography. All of my photos are typically of Vermont and in particular the villages and valleys of the Black River basin area.


See More ➤


Studio TWO

Featuring

April at Gallery 2 Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main Street in Brattleboro, is currently showing a range of works.

Featured in this photo exhibit are blue glass by Ed Branson [illustrated]; painting of sugaring by Paul Madalinski; horse by Joseph Fichter; circus photos by Jeffrey Lewis; stained glass canoe by David Wissman; paintings by Dane Tilghman. See More ➤


Studio 3

A seven color print, ‘Migration’, by William Hays


William Hays, printmaker

To view the images sequentially, click the link to Studio 3 and press ‘Play Slideshow.’

To illustrate a companion article on print making by Brattleboro artist William Hays, the subject kindly forwarded me these 7 images of a print in the making. The full article will appear as a Monthly Feature.  See More ➤


Studio 4

Featuring 6 Photographers



Len Emery

Phil Innes

Rich Holshuch

Merritt Brown

Ray Bates

Greg Worden



See More ➤


If You Lived Here

Jul 31, 2014


Vendor applications are now being accepted for the ninth season of the Winter Farmers' Market which will again be held at the River Garden in the heart of Brattleboro, VT.  Space for new vendors is limited but interested parties are encouraged to submit an application prior to the September 1 deadline.

 

The Winter Market opens on November 1 for the 2014/2015 season and will be open every Saturday through March 28, 2015 for a total of 22 markets.  The regular market hours for the Winter Farmers’ Market will be 10 am to 2 pm with hours extended to 3 pm for holiday shopping on the three December markets before Christmas. 

 

Our mission is to support sustainable agriculture by providing a viable winter-season direct market outlet for local community-based farms while building community and promoting regional sustainability.  A wide array of products are typically offered including locally grown and produced fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, baked goods, local wines, handcrafted items such as clothing, jewelry, pottery, soaps, lunch menus and more.  Preference is given to regional agricultural vendors interested in bringing new unduplicated products to our market. 

 

This is a juried market.  New vendors or returning vendors with new craft, prepared food or value-added products will need to present their items for jury at 5:00 pm on Tuesday, September 9 at the Community Room of the Brattleboro Savings & Loan.  Agriculture vendors selling farm produce do not need to be juried.  Any questions regarding the jury process can be directed to Susan Dunning at 802-228-3230.

 

Read More ➤


If You Lived Elsewhere

About 5,000 years ago The Quontock Hills would have looked much the same

  May 31, 2014



Fancy a walking holiday? Here is a selection of photos from across the pond in the Quontock hills, Somerset.


The Quantock Hills is a range of hills west of Bridgwater in Somerset, England. The Quantock Hills were England’s first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty being designated in 1956 and consists of large amounts of heathland, oak woodlands, ancient parklands and agricultural land.


The hills run from the Vale of Taunton Deane in the south, for about 15 miles (24 km) to the north-west, ending at East Quantoxhead and West Quantoxhead on the coast of the Bristol Channel. They form the western border of Sedgemoor and the Somerset Levels. From the top of the hills on a clear day, it is possible to see Glastonbury Tor and the Mendips to the east, Wales as far as the Gower Peninsula to the north, the Brendon Hills and Exmoor to the west, and the Blackdown Hills to the south. The highest point on the Quantocks is Wills Neck, at 1,261 feet (384 m) Soil types and weather combine to support the hills' plants and animals. In 1970 an area of 6,194.5 acres (2,506.8 ha) was designated as a Biological Site of Special Scientific Interest.


They have been occupied since prehistoric times with Bronze Age round barrows and Iron Age hill forts. Evidence from Roman times includes silver coins discovered in West Bagborough. In the later Saxon period, King Alfred led the resistance to Viking invasion, and Watchet was plundered by Danes in 987 and 997. The hills were fought over during the English Civil War and Monmouth Rebellion but are now a peaceful area popular with walkers, mountain bikers, horse riders and tourists. They explore paths such as the Coleridge Way used by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who lived in Nether Stowey from 1797 to 1799, or visit places of interest such as Quantock Lodge.


Evidence of activity in the Quantocks from prehistoric times includes finds of Mesolithic flints at North Petherton and Broomfield and many Bronze Age round barrows (marked on maps as tumulus, plural tumuli), such as Thorncombe Barrow above Bicknoller. Several ancient stones can be seen, such as the Triscombe Stone and the Long Stone above Holford. Many of the tracks along ridges of the Quantocks probably originated as ancient ridgeways. A Bronze Age hill fort, Norton Camp, was built to the south at Norton Fitzwarren, close to the centre of bronze making in Taunton.


Read More


A Word In Your Ear

“like a crab going to Ireland”


A NEW book on Devon dialect has shone the spotlight on some of the Westcountry's most weird and wonderful phrases.


Devon Dialect, written by language enthusiast Ellen Fernau, based in Norfolk, identifies some of the quirkiest words to be used in our neighbouring county.


A statement from the publisher, Bradwell Books, said: “Devon has a unique set of vocal traditions, many developed because of quirks of geography and others from a complex social demography.


“Many efforts have been made to record the language traditions of the area and to identify the sources of some of the words that are, or used to be, in common use.”


WEIRD AND WONDERFUL DEVONSHIRE WORDS

1. An ‘angletwich’ is a fidgety child or quick moving creature;

2. A ‘dummon’ is an affectionate (we hope) term for wife;

3. Devonians refer to holidaymakers as ‘grockles’ (in Cornwall they are known as ‘emmits’)

4. If you have been cheated, you have been ‘folshid’;

5. A ladybird is, rather grandly, a ‘god's cow’;

6. If you are being silly you are ‘maze as a brush’;

7. Or, if you have no sense, you have ‘no nort’;

8. And nonsense is ‘witpot’;

9. While the word for daft is ‘zart’;

Charmingly, ‘snishums’ is the Devon word for sneezing.


The book has prompted a flurry of responses from people in Devon offering words of their own as part of their dialect - but are these really Cornish terms?


More in your ear ➤



Curious Topics


Vermont Zombie Hunting — a true story

Jul 28, 2014

They say true stories are best, so here is one from Zon Estes.


A new Vermont experience.
I'm working in the yard. I hear people talking, yelling. (Occasionally people walking on trails around find their way toward our house.) When they were clearly in the yard, I walked over toward them.


Them is about a dozen guys. What caught my eye was the shirtless fellow wearing a pink tutu, leading a few of his buddies off a slight distance. Then I saw that most were painted--either on the face or all over. Oh, and sunglasses.


When they saw me, they explained that they were looking for Zombies. By now, there must've been two dozen mostly naked, jazzed up guys, ready to roll.
I directed the Zombie hunters toward a commonly missed turn. I can still hear them in the woods, up on the hillside. Blowing whistles and bellowing.
“Where the hell am I?”

Read More  ➤

send any answers or comments to onechess@comcast.net

100 Years Ago

Feature:  May 29, 1914

RMS Empress of Ireland

May 23, 2014



Caption: Sailors unloading the children’s coffins


RMS Empress of Ireland was an ocean liner that sank in the Saint Lawrence River following a collision with the Norwegian collier SS Storstad in the early hours of 29 May 1914. Of the 1,477 persons on board the ship, 1,012 (840 passengers, 172 crew) died. The number of those who were killed is considered largest of any Canadian maritime accident in peacetime.


Empress of Ireland was built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering at Govan on the Clyde in Scotland and was launched in 1906. The liner, along with her sister ship Empress of Britain, was commissioned by Canadian Pacific Steamships (CP) for the North Atlantic route between Quebec and Liverpool in England. The ship had just begun her 96th sailing when she sank.


The wreck lies in 40 metres (130 ft) of water, making it accessible to divers  Many artifacts from the wreckage have been retrieved. Some are on display in the Empress of Ireland Pavilion at the Site historique maritime de la Pointe-au-Père in Rimouski, Quebec. The Canadian government has passed legislation to protect the site.


Numerous books have been written about the sinking of Empress of Ireland and several films have been made. In January 2012, the Norwegian Radio NRK P2 broadcast a radio documentary.


There were only 465 survivors, 4 of whom were children (the other 134 children were lost) and 41 of whom were women (the other 269 women were lost). The fact that most passengers were asleep at the time of the sinking (most not even awakened by the collision) also contributed to the loss of life when they were drowned in their cabins, most of them from the starboard side where the collision happened. <extract>

Read More ➤


Local History

May 5, 2013


A lyrical homage by Charles Monette



With 1878’s best intentions, some sturdy men began

Building Brattleboro’s narrow gauge in the southeast kingdom

Upside verdant country, the West River, to South Londonderry

Financed by bankers’ bonds bought in towns’ river valleys

Read More



Sep 7, 2013

Photo by Vermont Views


A photo essay of 40 images and caption


“Before The Fall”



Read More



Reviews Old & New

By Joanna Trollope

Reviewed by: Alan Rayner


I found this an absorbing, moving and compelling story written in clear, unfussy, undemanding language, which held my interest throughout. Its core theme is both ancient and contemporary – the difference in priorities associated with the quest for hierarchical power and the needfulness of human beings as living, loving creatures. The former arises from and is sustained by the obliteration of the latter, resulting in the paradoxical desensitization and objectification of self- and group-identity that engenders human avarice, xenophobia and enmity. In military organizations this desensitization is deliberate. Here is how John Keegan (2004) describes military training:-

‘…the deliberate injection of emotion…will seriously hinder, if not altogether defeat, the aim of officer-training. That aim…is to reduce the conduct of war to a set of rules and a system of procedures – and thereby make orderly and rational what is essentially chaotic and instinctive. It is an aim analogous to that pursued by medical schools in their fostering among students of a detached attitude to pain and distress… the rote-learning and repetitive form and the categorical, reductive quality …has an important and intended psychological effect. Anti-militarists would call it depersonalizing and even dehumanizing. But given…that battles are going to happen, it is powerfully beneficial…one is helping him to avert the onset of fear, or, worse, of panic… ’


<extracts>  Read More ➤


Brattleboro Skyline

A massive photo essay with captions

Jun 11, 2014


The Slow Living Summit and The Strolling of the Heifers 2014


Read More ➤


Localvore Directory

Click this link for locally grown and manufactured food products and how to find them directly

Mar 24, 2013


To add your business to the free listing of Localvores — contact the publisher at onechess@comcast.net


Phone numbers, websites, e-mails, travel directions and hours of business of a few dozen local farms and businesses making Vermont food products. Support your local food economy!


Just Added — Full Plate Farm

 

Full Plate Farm is a one acre vegetable farm conveniently located one and a half miles from downtown Brattleboro, VT.  We grow over 100 varieties of delectable, nutritious veggies using organic practices. We offer a CSA which includes all of our veggies, as well as berries and sweet corn from a few other local farms. We offer 12 different share options, so that you can choose how much produce you get and when. We also offer options between some of the veggies in your share as well as a “swap box” so that you will always have a choice to trade out a veggie you don’t like for one you do. Every week we include recipes and cooking suggestions. 


Read More ➤


This column is sponsored by the Brattleboro Food Coop http://brattleborofoodcoop.coop


Write On!

hardly chanced upon in books

Phil Innes

Jul 21, 2013



'Even in the penance

Planning sins anew’


Says a verse of St Kilda

And to add a few words


We were silenced

Not subdued.


I gave thee love when thou wast but a child

Love that shall not wane till I go beneath the earth


[from a song; St Kilda lilt]


Ciod e am bas a fhuair t’arthair?

Chaidh e leis


(How did your father die?

Over the cliff, is the reply)


So might we prefer they say of ourselves, we who live yet, and work for other god than we had chanced afore. All this in the clear light hardly chanced upon in books.


<extract> Read More ➤


B.E.S.T

Are you wearing Dhaka?

Photo by Vermont Views Shop Window

This article is an extract from The Guardian, UK


When it comes to fashion, applying even the most modest ethical criteria is ridiculously hard. All the big chains – including Primark, which had a supplier in the destroyed Rana Plaza building on Dhaka's outskirts, and has promised "to provide support where possible" to the families of the 187 workers known to have died – have ethics policies that can be viewed online. None has a clearly labelled and readily availably Fairtrade or equivalent line on the shop floor.


Read More



Archive

Hundreds of previous articles



A collection of contributed work, articles and columns from around the community, including transcripts from 80+ recorded interviews from the ‘In Conversation With’ series.


Go to Archive ➤


Vermont Views Magazine

Unless otherwise stated all content claimed copyright © 2010 and 2014

all rights reserved by Vermont Views Magazine

vermontviews.org 


Write for permissions to reprint or extract,

to the publisher at


onechess@comcast.net


Vermont Views Magazine

Quality of Life, Spirit of Place





 

Vermont Views Magazine


Home Page

 

Articles,  Columns & Galleries

  New Articles

The crowded Connecticut River

near Brattleboro


Photos of the Day sponsored by:

Fine Art

&

Contemporary American Craft

106 Main St.   Brattleboro, VT 05301  

www.vtart.com    (802) 257-7044

  Passages Daily  Luck





“You know, Hobbes, some days even my lucky rocket ship underpants don't help.”

Bill Watterson


“Remember that sometimes not getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck.”

Dalai Lama XIV


“Some luck lies in not getting what you thought you wanted but getting what you have, which once you have it you may be smart enough to see is what you would have wanted had you known. ”

Garrison Keillor


“Most young women do not welcome promiscuous advances. (Either that, or my luck's terrible.)”

Groucho Marx


“Do ya' feel lucky, punk?”

Clint Eastwood


“I'm a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it”

Thomas Jefferson


“Oh, I am fortune's fool!”

William Shakespeare


“People always call it luck when you’ve acted more sensibly than they have. ”

Anne Tyler


“What i'm saying is that the sun always rises. Fortune's a mix of good and bad luck. Like they say/ good luck and bad luck are strands of the same rope.”

Sakura Tsukuba

 

To This Degree


An image a day every day of the year

   

Today: Early morning dew sparkles as sunlight floods the field


The exalted feeling that rises within the soul of the individual who has successfully passed through the long night of faith which has tested strength and faith.


TRANSFIGURATION


Aug 1 2014 Leo 10°  (1° to 15° Leo is COMBUSTION in Act 2; Stabilization)

 

Brattleboro Skyline

Jun 11, 2014


Slow Living Summit


Strolling of the Heifers

2014


See More ➤

 
Column 4our

writers: Charles Monette, Laura Momaney, Matti Salminen, Nanci Bern

Art of independent study

Matti Salminen

Jul 26, 2014

Writing for Vermont Views has afforded me something, which does not, necessarily, come to writers easily.  I am, in writing for Phil, building a work history in publication.  4our will be the third column I’ve worked on for Vermont Views.  In this column, I intend to keep a theme of self-education, but I will not stick to it strictly.

Writing has become the focal point in my studies since I first began blogging two years ago.  I’ve managed to turn my life around through writing practice.  It has opened doors for me that for so long I thought would be closed forever.

Learning should serve to broaden one’s horizons.  It should aid a student in leading a more fulfilling life.  Included in life fulfillment are eight dimensions of wellness.  These eight dimensions of wellness are as follows: environmental, physical, occupational, financial, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual. Seeking independent learning seems, on its surface, to be less constructive in occupational and financial wellness than a formal college education.  So let’s hammer this issue out right from the start.

One of the things I recommend first for anyone pursuing self-education is to learn a trade.  In regards to the eight dimensions of wellness, occupational and financial fulfillment will be improved by learning a trade.  However, study skills will also be improved by learning a trade.  Gaining hands-on experience in a trade will help a person to understand how knowledge aids skill—and proficiency.

Also noteworthy, learning a trade can show a person how much learning from books will assist their quest in independent study; and how much learning should come from getting their feet wet…by gaining real life experience.

Bicycle maintenance is possibly the trade I’m most knowledgeable and skilled in.  I went to a trade school in Colorado Springs to learn to do general bicycle repair, and wheel building.  Having this educational background helped me to have work at a non-profit bicycle shop in Burlington.  Working as a bicycle mechanic, daily, cemented the skills I developed at school. Learning a trade will broaden horizons, however, it isn’t sufficient to have the equivalent learning of a college degree.  Other pursuits, regarding my education, have been crucial to my search for independence along my path of self directed learning.

<extract> Read More ➤

 

Column Untitled Work


Snake Skins 

Mac Gander

My wife has been confined from her usual athleticism by a broken foot, and we’re on a college break, too, so she has directed an orgy of housecleaning, years of accumulated boxes and so on coming down from the attic and up from the basement in this home we have made together for so many years now. Our older daughter, just graduated from college, has been helping sometimes, and last night as we were all going through boxes and watching Croatia play Brazil, she found a ream of old photographs in a box I have probably not noticed for two decades. She handed them to me, and I could see that they were what are left of the photos I took in Manila during the People’s Revolution in 1986.


It was impossible for a mediocre photographer like me to take any good shot of the thing, in that pre-digital era when film and developing cost real money, so you only could take a few shots, no selfies. The crowd was huge, four million strong hanging out like a block party on the broad avenue called EDSA, and my focus was poor. It was a cheap camera, a Pentax 1000 I had picked up at a discount place in Kowloon along with a small manual typewriter, and while I had a zoom lens, it was not a very good lens. As I looked at the photographs it felt impossible than any of it had ever mattered. It did, of course, but the time is so distant now that meaning has been threshed from it in my repeated revisitings over the years. I think “hypostatized” is the technical term.


Still, in the mix of photos I also found two snake skins—collected at a different point but somehow mixed in with the photos—and also the one photo I ever had of Ghani, the Marcos hit-man I met at an Ihaw-Ihaw the day after the revolution. And it was wonderful, on this misty Vermont evening, how quickly the photograph of Ghani leapt to my memory and accorded with it, the thin pencil mustache, the smirk that substituted for a smile, the red bandana worn pirate-style, the dark aviator sunglasses like a third-string CIA operative in the Vietnam era.


I once had a pair of those glasses, too, smoky gray, and I used to wear them at night when I wandered barefoot on the Manhattan streets when I was 18. I would walk from Riverside Drive up to Broadway and then down along the avenue watching the whores and pimps and dealers, and then I would walk back home again on West End. I don’t know what I was trying to prove, or what any of this means now.  I was just young and I felt edgy sometimes. But the two snake skins with the photos seemed salutary. How many skins have I shed, over these many years, and which still cling to me? What more do I have to shed?


Still, seeing Ghani again and holding the image in my hand brought one memory back, hard and keen. We were traveling together, living under cover for a while after the revolution. Ghani was hiding from the new forces of righteousness that had taken over the capitol, forces I had supported with all my being, and I was hiding from my life.


I had been out of touch with home for a while, and then the phones were down during the Revolution, so when I called my father after the show was over, I had a lot to say to him, but he interrupted to tell me that he had decided to leave my mother. It was a strange time in my family. He seemed a great deal more preoccupied with what was going on in his own life than anything happening in mine, so we didn’t talk long.


Then I called the woman I had been living with in Manhattan before I left, my lovely poet friend, but her grandmother had just died and she was very angry with me for having been out of touch for so long. She also had a new lover, though I did not know it at the time. I had a new lover, too, whom she did not know about--a street-girl named Diana whom I fed and sheltered, and later married—a different story, and her name was actually Lorna, not Diana, although I did not learn that for six more months.

<extract> Read More ➤

 

Monkey’s Cloak


Globe Skimmer

Laura Momaney



Walk with me a bit, lend me the comfort of your companionship

Cover me with soft kisses and make me dance 

Teach me a lesson, show me grace

Fold me in your arms against fate's locked embrace 


My heart's a weeping widow, I wouldn't change it much

 It bends beautiful, like gossamer weeping willow

Branches dance in the wind, dispersing dancing dust 

 

Untether my soul and lead me astray

Take it to the street, let me play. I beg of you

Take me down with you

Teach me to swim or let me drown with you 

  

Drowning men chant two words, 'Save me!' 

Beggar men, they know three, 'Blessed are we!' 


 The Gods up there rolling dice, laugh at me and my latest plight  

One roll brings you in on dirty angel wings, next roll takes you out again 

Both rolls scare me


The first one made me sing, the second brought me poetry

Both caught my heart off guard, both rolls hit me hard

 Knocked me around

 Two rolls dropped my knees to the ground. 


<extract>


Read More ➤

 

Weekly Feature

The Wild Mountain Thyme



O the summer time has come

And the trees are sweetly blooming

And wild mountain thyme

Grows around the purple heather.

Will you go, lassie, go?


Chorus And we'll all go together, To pull wild mountain thyme, All around the purple heather. Will you go, lassie, go?


I will build my love a tower,

By yon clear crystal fountain,

And on it I will pile,

All the flowers of the mountain.

Will you go, lassie, go?


I will range through the wilds

And the deep land so dreary

And return with the spoils

To the bower o' my dearie.

Will ye go lassie go ?


If my true love she'll not come,

Then I'll surely find another,

To pull wild mountain thyme,

All around the purple heather.

Will you go, lassie, go?


The song is commonly described as a variant of "The Braes of Balquhidder" by Robert Tannahill (1774-1810), which was named after the braes, or hills, of Balquhidder near Loche

arnhead, and has a similar lyric and tune. For example, the first two verses of "The Braes of Balquhidder" are:


<extracts> Read More ➤

 

Guest Article


An excerpt from the forthcoming title:

Magnificent Obesity: My Search for Wellness, Voice and Meaning in the Second Half of Life,

published August 26 from Hatherleigh Press/Random House.


Martha M Moravec


When the shock of a heart attack at age 55 accelerates my midlife crisis into a nightmare of phobias and panic attacks, my doctor suggests that I ask my friends to organize themselves into a support team to help me through the trauma. Sadly, it occurs to me that with the exception of one best friend, I have lost touch with all the friends and social groups I had relied upon during my 35 years in Brattleboro.


So you see, there had always been a gang. But not at this time, not now. Entire casts of friends, acquaintances, and extras had disbanded; I had moved on or they had moved on; we had separated as a matter of course or blithely drifted apart. At the time of my heart attack, after a year and a half of unemployment and mostly solitary writing, I was working at another nonprofit, mission-driven organization with a wide array of services and programs but only two staff: the executive director and me.


My solution was to try rounding up one of the old gangs, members of the bar crowd from 30 years before who still lived in the area, people I occasionally ran into on the street and occasionally celebrated birthdays with, all women, some younger than me, some older, some married, some not.


I called the elder, the one we might consider the leader of the pack, whose thriving pub on Main Street had supplied us with employment and a stomping ground as bartenders, waitresses, and cooks. When I asked her to put out the word about my situation and perhaps organize a lineup of gatherings and good times, I should have sensed trouble in her hesitation and slight befuddlement. I did not, however, because I was having a vision of something so natural I assumed that everyone would spontaneously and joyously share it.


I was thinking of community. When the author Dan Buettner set out with a National Geographic team of demographers, anthropologists, and medical researchers to identify where in the world people lived longest, and why, he concluded that even more than the plant-based diets of the numerous centenarians living in what he called the Blue Zones, it was their faith-based communities that kept them vital and engaged past the age of 100.

Longevity in the Blue Zone begins with healthy, moderate eating; regular physical activity; and regular, moderate drinking but it ends with a greater emphasis on values reinforced by prevailing behaviors within the culture: an established means of relieving stress, a sense of purpose in life, a strong sense of belonging, a commitment to putting families first and keeping them close, and the luck or inclination to be living in an environment that makes a healthy lifestyle possible.


Invariably, every city on every list of Best Places to Retire has a manageable, vibrant, or walkable downtown. The proliferation of niche communities, co-housing options, and village models indicates that those in a position to plan for retirement are not planning to retire in splendid isolation. Nor should they be. Studies reveal that the more friends a woman has, the less likely she is to develop physical ailments or depression as she ages, and indeed, another trend in retirement living options appears to be the readiness of divorced, widowed, or never married women to pool resources and move in with each other.


For me, Dr. Sczesny’s suggestion conjured images of housewives in ancient Greece gathering for gossip at the well, medieval maidens singing chansons while weaving at the loom, American frontierswomen congregating under the pretext of a quilting bee, contemporary women “doing” lunch or seeking aid and comfort in online health and wellness communities. They are images of women telling their stories, their very own, private stories, finding the words, speaking the words and experiencing those words as received, witnessed, and understood.

<extract> Read More ➤

 
Column Nurturing Nature

Air

Tasneem Tawfeek

Jul 31, 2014


...let's take a closer look at the issue of deforestation. This issue is a major concern, not only in the United States, but all over the world. According to livescience.com, "an estimated 18 million acres of forest are lost each year." It is safe to say that deforestation has taken a major toll on the Earth's vast forests, which ultimately results in damage to the quality of the environment, which, of course, has many negative effects. For starters, one of the biggest impacts of deforestation is the loss of habitats for millions of species. A majority of the Earth's animals actually depend on  and live in forests, and unfortunately, do not survive in the wild because of the loss of their habitat due to deforestation. In addition to this, deforestation alters the climate severely. Soil makes up a large amount of a forest, and needs to be protected by the shade of the trees in order to thrive and prosper within the forest. However, because of deforestation, the soil quickly dries out because of too much exposure to the sun's rays. Without the trees in place to protect the soil, forests can eventually become deserts. Also, with the loss of trees, harmful substances, such as the greenhouse gases, cannot be absorbed and are released into the atmosphere, resulting in global warming.  As if these issues are not enough, I simply cannot imagine not being able to, one day, rely on the beauty of endless forests as I seek to reflect upon other issues of our world.


In addition, pollution is not any newcomer to this world. It has been an ongoing environmental issue for years, and continues to grow at a rapid pace. Air, water, and even soil pollution are just a few of the many forms of pollution that affect our surroundings.  Air pollution proves to be the most dangerous for the environment. The harmful smoke released from vehicles, chimneys, factories, or the burning of wood, have played a big role in damaging the environment. The sulfur dioxide emitted from the smoke causes global warming and acid rain to occur, and as a result, has increased temperatures and has caused droughts to take place as well. With these harmful gases in the air health issues such as asthma and lung cancer are becoming more and more evident in people. Not only this, water pollution has greatly affected many species living on Earth. Toxic wastes that are dumped into various bodies of water have caused the water to become contaminated with chemicals, leading to the deaths of many sea creatures. Lastly, soil pollution, which takes place because of human activities, has a great impact on the environment.


The soil on Earth is gradually becoming more unfit for plants to grow in due to the use of pesticides and insecticides. Because the plants do not grow properly, soil erosion takes place. Those blue skies and oceans that we value a great deal for our own pleasure should be better maintained as they certainly contribute to our own well being.

<extracts> Read More ➤

 

Weather

Aug 1, 2014





from NOAA

The National Weather Service


Brattleboro: Isolated showers and thunderstorms after noon. Partly sunny, with a high near 84. South wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.


Tonight
Isolated showers and thunderstorms before midnight, then a slight chance of showers after 3am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63. South wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 20%.


National: Tropical Storm Bertha moving toward northeastern Caribbean


The National Hurricane Center is currently monitoring Tropical Storm Bertha as it moves toward the northeastern Caribbean, with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, with Bertha expected to pass just south of Puerto Rico on Saturday, before eventually curving to the north and northeast, away from the U.S. mainland.


Vermont Views

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Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack from her title

Art & Soul

Clothes


When I work, I can’t wear intense colors. I become a vehicle, a channel; any strong color,  clothing style, or hairdo stimulates the ego and acts as an interference.


I own two pairs of painting pants. One is an old favorite, patinaed with several years of accumulated paint, and the other is a backup pair that is gradually being broken in as a replacement.


All the clothing must fit comfortably and not be restrictive in any way. Long sleeves can’t be baggy, or they hamper action and freedom.


Shoes are important; they must be comfortable enough that I can endure hours of standing, and have a spring to them so I can sprint around the studio.


For artists, particularly, clothes become a protective skin, providing a freedom to work.

 
Write On!

hardly chanced upon in books

Phil Innes

Jul 21, 2013



'Even in the penance

Planning sins anew’


Says a verse of St Kilda

And to add a few words


We were silenced

Not subdued.


I gave thee love when thou wast but a child

Love that shall not wane till I go beneath the earth


[from a song; St Kilda lilt]


Ciod e am bas a fhuair t’arthair?

Chaidh e leis


(How did your father die?

Over the cliff, is the reply)


So might we prefer they say of ourselves, we who live yet, and work for other god than we had chanced afore. All this in the clear light hardly chanced upon in books.


<extract> Read More ➤

 

StudioONE

Len Emery


The Project:

Goffstown Slaughterhouse


Here is a small representative sample of a fairly large project at a slaughterhouse in Goffstown.


The Photographer

Len Emery


"I come from an engineering background with all of its inflexibility and predefinition. Conversely, photography is often fleeting and very much undefined. I try to capture the image as it happens, the instant framed from my perspective for all to see my interpretation. I try to use the environment as an element of the image, allowing it to enhance and sometimes be the image. I then try to draw the viewer into the image as I was drawn in when I first saw it.


I am a pilot as well as a photographer and use my flying skills and camera together when doing contract aerial photography. All of my photos are typically of Vermont and in particular the villages and valleys of the Black River basin area.

See More ➤

 

Daily Articles

To This Degree

An image a day for every day of the year.


Passages

& Quiz Quote


Weather

Local & National


Pretty Often

Art & Soul

Notes on Creating


New

Feature

Articles

New Column

Nurturing Nature

Tasneem Tawfeek

Air

Jul 31, 2014



Guest Article

Martha M Moravec

IMAGINARY FRIENDS

Jul 28, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Laura Momaney

Globe Skimmer

Jul 29, 2014



Weekly Feature

The Wild Mountain Thyme

Jul 28, 2014



Curious Topics

Vermont Zombie Hunting — a true story

Jul 28 2014




Vermont Diary

Performance anxiety, god

Jul 27 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Mac Gander

Three AM in Green River, Mid-July

Jul 27, 2014



4our

Matti Salminen

Art of independent study

Jul 26, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Taking a wheelchair to the garden

Jul 24, 2014



Untitled work

Mac Gander

Snake Skins

Jul 22, 2014




Write On!

Phil Innes

hardly chanced upon in books

Jul 21, 2014




Special Feature

St. Kilda

Island at the edge of Imagination



4our

Charles Monette

Labyrinth as a Universal Truth

Jul 19, 2014




Open Mind

Offie Wortham

Ex-Felons Automatically Have The Right To Vote in Vermont!

Jul 19, 2014




Vermont Diary

The butler, war, humanity

Jul 16 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Learned ghosts surround me now

Jul16, 2014


Real Food ! 

Blendering & Bolognese

Tara Innes

Jul 15, 2014




New Column

Articulate

Kate Anderson

Leadership

Jul 15, 2014




Weekly Feature

Alan Rayner

FAR NORTH

Jul 14, 2014




StudioONE

Len Emery

Goffstown Slaughterhouse

Jul 11, 2014




Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

Foraging

Jun 13, 2014



Guest Article

Christian McEwen

Teach Slow

Jul 11, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Once, a pond, a time

Jul 10, 2014




4our

Laura Momaney

Darkness and blinding, brilliant light

Jul 12, 2014




O Citoyen!

Robert Oeser

MOLLIE BURKE ON TRANSPORT VERMONT

A Report

Jul 9, 2014





Vermont Diary

Another funeral I won’t attend

Jul 8 2014



4our

Matti Salminen

Learning of my life

Jul 7, 2014



Untitled work

Mac Gander

Doc Humes and the Invisible War

Jul 6, 2014



rape

“That sounds a little biblical to me”

Laurie Green

Jul 5, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

“Gasland Part II”

Jul 5, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Mac Gander

Charles Monette

Terri Kneipp

3 Poems, incidentally

Jul 3, 2014




New Column

Articulate

Kate Anderson

Design and Connections

Jul 3, 2014




Write On!

Murder in the woods

Matti Salminen

Jul 1, 2014



The Great Adventure

Terri Kneipp

Like a girl

Jul 1, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Mac Gander

On Black Mountain View Road

Jun 30, 2014



Beer & Bangers

J.D McCliment’s and MacLaomainn's Scottish Pub

Jun 30 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Matti Salminen

Long necked birds

Jun 29, 2014




Selected Letters

Mac Gander

Dress Code

Jun 29, 2014




Vermont Diary

It’s hot in the kitchen

Jun 28 2014



New Column

4our

Charles Monette

Walking a Sacred Labyrinth Centering to  place

Jun 28, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

What We Know

Jun 25, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

After The Solstice


Loneliness hogging my conversations

2 Poems, Mac Gander and Charles Monette

Jun 23, 2014





Non Profit

of the Month


Farming Connections, Inc

Jun 23, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Terri Kneipp

The Long

Good-bye

Jun 23, 2014



Write On!

The Strange Tale of Sam Whitlock

a short story by dale r. botten

Jun 23, 2014




New Column

4our

Laura Momaney

The Lost and Found

Jun 22, 2014



Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

Dangerous Inclinations

Jun 22, 2014



Vermont Diary

Bra straps in Brattleboro

Jun 21 2014



Selected Letters

Margaret Rogers

Knoxville: Summer of 1915  by James Agee

Jun 20, 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

Inman Square (I)

Jun 19, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Richard A. Dudman

Broken

Jun 18, 2014



Curious Topics

Where no girl has gone before

Jun 17, 2014




New Column

4our

Matti Salminen

What is Clintonia?

Jun 17, 2014




Guest Article

Robert A. Dudman

Flourishing

Jun 15, 2014



If You Lived Here

Proof

Vermont, Smartest State

Jun 14, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Maclean Gander

Sunday Breaks on Deer Park Brook:

Two Sonnets

Jun 13, 2014



Energetics

George Harvey

Another $15billion ready — Buffett

Jun 13, 2014



Weekly Feature

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ROUNDTABLE

BaBB BRAINSTORM/IDEA BOARD

Part 3/4

Jun 12, 2014




New Column

Nurturing Nature

Tasneem Tawfeek

Seeds of Wonder

Jun 12, 2014



Brattleboro Skyline

Massive photo essay with captions

Slow Living Summit & The Strolling of the Heifers 2014

Jun 11, 2014



Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

Memory/ Forgiveness

Jun 10, 2014



Open Mind

Offie Wortham

“Does Our Government Have Any Responsibility to Help Our Children Defend Themselves Against Advertising?”

Jun 9, 2014



Chess

Phil Innes

Real Survivor Part 2 ‘inner strength’

Jun 8, 2014



Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jeri Rose

Bathroom Stories

Jun 8, 2014



Arts & Leisure

Matti Salminen 

Slow Living Summit

Jun 8, 2014



Untitled Work

Mac Gander

Fugue State

Jun 6, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

June Climate Change Café Features Community Conversation with Area Artists

Jun 6, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Wetlands Campaign

Jun 5, 2014



Op Ed

Linda Whiton

Creating the Strength to Speak,

a book about adoption and Moms.

Jun 2, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Jeri Rose

How Alone

June 1, 2014



Real Food ! 

Comb Potato?

Mark Lee

Jun 1, 2014




Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

A Different Sort of Book Review

Jun 1, 2014



If You Lived Elsewhere

About 5,000 years ago The Quontock Hills would have looked much the same

May 31, 2014



Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

Engaging the Unengaged

May 30, 2014




O Citoyen!

Robert Oeser

Citizen’s Breakfast Report

Orly Munzing and The Strolling

May 29, 2014




Publisher’s Challenge #4

“Did you ever have a Barbie or a GI Joe*?”

May 28, 2014




Vermont Diary

Where they all go to die

May 27 2014




in between

Julia Ferrari

Following a Thread 

May 27, 2014




Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jeri Rose

Soul Food

May 26, 2014



Open Mind

Offie Wortham

So, are you an Alien?

May 25, 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

What Remains Of Us

May 24, 2014




100 Years Ago

Feature:  May 29, 1914

RMS Empress of Ireland

May 23, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Kisses anchored in fear 

May 23, 2014





Weekly Feature

Mark Twain

Is Shakespeare Dead? 

May 22, 2014




Open Mind

Offie Wortham

“The Uniqueness of the Trans-Cultural Awareness Institute”

May 22, 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

Transgression and other loves

May 21, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Ian Turnbull

Terri Kneipp

Two Poems on a theme 

May 19, 2014


Vermont Diary

May 18, 2014




Energetics

George Harvey

Tea and Turbines 

May 18, 2014



Chess

Phil Innes

Is it Time to Kill College Sports?

May 18, 2014


Reviews

Old & New

By Joanna Trollope

Reviewed by

Alan Rayner



Real Food ! 

Grandma’s Rhubarb Pie

Tara Innes

May 17, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Derek Innes

Fallen Angel 

May 16, 2014




Publisher’s Challenge #3

“Designer Incarnation 2100 Application”

May 15, 2014




Open Mind

Offie Wortham

“My Next Time Around”

May 15, 2014




Untitled Work

Mac Gander

Burning Leaves

May 14, 2014




Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jeri Rose

A Mother's Day Tail

May 13, 2014




Monkey’s Cloak

Alan Rayner

Wreckage 

May 12, 2014



If You Lived Elsewhere


The Far Side

  May 11, 2014



Selected Letters

Tasneem Tawfeek

Helping Earth: Small Changes

May 10, 2014



Vermont Diary

Adventures in Consciousness

May 9 2014




My Side of Madness

Matti Salminen

Embrace Love

May 9, 2014



Vermont Diary

Burying the body

May 8 2014


If You Lived Here

Hal-an-tow or The Furry Dance

May 8, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

Climate Change Café Screens “The Wisdom to Survive”

May 7, 2014


If You Lived Here

The US Postal Letter Carrier Food Drive is this Saturday, May 10th!

May 7, 2014




O Citoyen!

Brattleboro Citizens' Breakfast Invitation

Robert Oeser

May 7, 2014



Arts & Leisure

Matti Salminen 

Brought to life

May 6, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Here come those 5 o’clock birds 

May 6, 2014



Weekly Feature

Firefighters, the first 60 seconds

May 4, 2014



Guest Article

Christian McEwen

Time to Talk

May 3, 2014




Energetics

George Harvey

Renewables, Carbon & Money

US and World Energy News

May 3, 2014



Open Mind

Offie Wortham

People should determine their own Ethnicity

May 2, 2014



Vermont Diary

Zorba and Frankie

May 1, 2014



Publisher’s Challenge

Lloyd Graf

“Short, short story”

May 1, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

A CALL FOR ENTRIES 

The Art of Climate Change

May 1, 2014



100 Years Ago

Valley of the Kings

May 1, 2014



Reviews

Old & New

Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language: Hereditary Deafness on Martha's Vineyard

By Nora Ellen Groce

Apr 30, 2014



Natural Inclusivity

Alan Rayner

NATURAL INCLUSION FOR THE YOUNG OF HEART AND MIND

Apr 30, 2014




rape

An open letter to President and Michelle Obama

Laurie Green

Apr 29, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

We are All Polar Bears

Apr 29, 2014



If You Lived Here

Library Cuts

Apr 28, 2014



Selected Letters

Robert Oeser

A Modest Proposal?  Letter to the Selectboard

Apr 28, 2014




Studio2

Featuring

Ed Branson, Paul Madalinski, Joseph Fichter, Jeffrey Lewis, David Wissman, Dane Tilghman

Apr 28, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

A fair English complexion 

Apr 27, 2014



Vermont Diary

Criminal inactivity, evident  non representation, cultural cumulation

Apr 26, 2014



Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

Elderly Abuse

Apr 26, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Anon

The Wolf of the Desert 

Apr 24, 2014



My Side of Madness

Matti Salminen

Siege Psychiatry

Apr 24, 2014



Arts & Leisure

Matti Salminen 

Digging Deeper

Apr 23, 2014




New Column

Open Mind

Offie Wortham

Affirmative Action should be based on Need not Race

Apr 23, 2014



Guest Article

Mac Gander

Story in Three Days and Nights, A Fragment

Apr 22, 2014



Reviews

Old & New

From the BBC...

Jamaica Inn

Apr 21, 2014


Weekly Feature

In Conversation with Gemma Champoli, Hospice

Apr 19, 2014



If You Lived Elsewhere

The Minack Theatre

Apr 19, 2014



Vermont Diary

Shootists

Apr 18, 2014



Curious Topics

Zentai suits

Would You Like To Wear These?

Apr 18, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

2 Good Friday Poems

Ian Turnbull

For Grace 

&

Terri Kneipp

All So We Wouldn’t Cry Alone



Real Food !

Tara Innes

Green Sauces, 2 variations

Apr 17, 2014



Studio 4

Group Shoot

6 PHOTOGRAPHERS

3

THEMES

Apr 17, 2014




Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

Life Is a Deck of Cards or Change is the Constant

Apr 16, 2014



Write On!

Offie C. Wortham

Relativity  

Apr 16, 2014


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jeri Rose

Body Politics  

Apr 15, 2014



New Column

Open Mind

Offie Wortham

Digital/Device Detoxing is Common Sense

Apr 14, 2014



New Column

Ars Gratia Artis

Terri Kneipp

A rose is a rose is a rose!

Apr 14, 2014


If You Lived Elsewhere

Beer Special

Apr 13, 2014


Guest Article

Nanci Bern

The Great Exodus—Salamanders and Passover Crossings

Apr 13, 2014



Publisher’s Challenge

“Short, short story”

Apr 13, 2014



Monkey’s Cloak

Charles Monette

Stray details  

Apr 12, 2014



Vermont Diary

A survey

PhDs, ‘pot holes’ and a billion bucks

Mar 11, 2014



My Side of Madness

Matti Salminen

Unjustified aspirations

Apr 11, 2014




100 Years Ago

Feature: April 20, 1914

The Ludlow Massacre

Apr 10, 2014



Energetics

George Harvey

Science and Technology, US and World Energy News

Apr 9, 2014



Old Lady Blog

Toni Ortner

The Woman Who Juggled Glass Balls

Apr 9, 2014



Arts & Leisure

Matti Salminen

What excites imagination?

Apr 8, 2014



Vermont Diary

Sap, columnists, hype, just like you

Apr 6, 2014




Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

Food Security Collaborative Benefit Concert

Apr 6, 2014



Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Jeri Rose

A Modest Proposal

Apr 5, 2014



Non Profit of the Month

Loaves and Fishes

A special invitation from

Bill and Nancy Ames

Apr 5, 2014




New Column

Open Mind

Offie Wortham

Do we really have a caste system in America?!

Apr 5, 2014



rape

Cherries in the Snow

Laurie Green

Apr 4, 2014



Selected Letters

Lloyd Graf

Pot Holes essential to local economy?

Apr 3, 2014



Write On!

Mac Gander

Teaching the Prose Poem at the 100th Anniversary of the Great War

Apr 2, 2014



Post Oil Solutions

Tim Stevenson

Climate Change Cafe: "Dealing with Climate Change in Vermont"

Apr 2, 2014



The Great Adventure

Terri Kneipp

Daddies’ Little Girls

Apr 1, 2014



100 Years Ago

Feature: 31st March, 1914

First Survey of Easter Island

Mar 31, 2014



Beer & Bangers

Terri Kneipp

Spring — Beer, Impartially Considered

Mar 30, 2014



New Column

Ars Gratia Artis

Terri Kneipp

Ray Bates, The British Clockmaker

Mar 29, 2014



Just Added

Full Plate Farm

Localvore Directory

Mar 24, 2014



Selected Letters

Offie Wortham

The Call for a National Conversation to bury

“The One-Drop Rule”

Mar 25, 2014


rape

Howard Dean — Don’t go to Dartmouth

A GUEST ARTICLE by CHARLOTTE ALBRIGHT

Mar 20, 2014



Op Ed

Rebecca Burns

We can’t even  feed ourselves

Food Deserts

Mar 17, 2014


Monthly Feature

Photo Essay

William Hays,

print maker

February, 2014