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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

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New Features, Articles & Columns


Write On!

Grey Tower

Phil Innes


The First Glass

Writing like a Painter

Vincent Panella


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Ice floes slow

Charles Monette


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 2 —

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

Mein Yertle

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Lion

Lawrence Klepp


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 1 —

Lloyd Graf


100 Years Ago

Births Jan-Jun 1917


With Prejudice

With Prejudice — 4 topics

Elizabeth Hill


O Citoyen!

Four Pennies

Robert Oeser


With Prejudice

Flesh of My Flesh:  Reflections on Prejudice & Love

Shanta Lee Gander


With Prejudice

Finding America

Vincent Panella


Story Page

Matinicus The Marvelous Cat

MM Kizi


Meanderings

White as Snow

Charles Monette


Love In Action

People Power in Pink

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

Populism

Offie Wortham


Witness

Teaching Again

Mac Gander


Ponder me

The Unexpected Gift We All Received From President Trump

Shanta Lee


Meanderings

White Buffalo in the Sky

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

Venus Smiled

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

A resolute spirit

Nanci Bern


StudioTWO

The Owens


Ponder me

From Self-Immolation to Hashtag Activism:

Shanta Lee


The First Glass

For the Birds

Vincent Panella


Chess

“The Mating Game”

Phil Innes


Overheard

Literacy

part 1, the USA


Witness

Code-switching

Mac Gander


Ponder me

The Cautionary Tales of

Shiny New Places

Shanta Lee


Love In Action

New Year’s Reflections on

“Charlotte’s Web”

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Spiritual Theft in the

Year of the Monkey


Ponder me

2016:  The Year of

It is What it Is

Shanta Lee


SCREENplay

Manchester by the Sea

Lawrence Klepp


Witness

Street Life, New York City

Mac Gander


Meanderings

White Mountain

Charles Monette


The First Glass

San Diego, Ocean Beach – November 17, 2016

Vincent Panella


SCREENplay

Allied

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

Oh, Holidays

Nanci Bern


Witness

Wake Up Call

Mac Gander


Old Lady Blog

Gone/ All Gone

Toni Ortner


Ponder me

Intangible Things =

Intangible Human Relationships

Shanta Lee


An A-musing Life

Mushroom Soup with John

Nanci Bern


Ponder me

We’ve Come Undone: 

Our Gender Problem

Shanta Lee


in between

FEAR

Julia Ferarri


Post Oil Solutions

Integrity in the time of

climate change

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Last leaves leaving

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Braveheart

Elizabeth Hill


Ponder me

Moonlight or “I, too, Am America” for a New Era?

Shanta Lee


Urban Naturalist

Hogle in Fall:

a Subdued Sanctuary Hunkers Down for Winter

Lloyd Graf


Guest Article

Trimalchio in the White House: The American Dream Comes True

Mac Gander


Vermont Diary

Quality of Life


An A-musing Life

11/12 and Counting

Nanci Bern


World & US Energy News

Nov 15 Just one day in the energy life of the planet

George Harvey


Meanderings

As if

Charles Monette


Open Mind

What Will Become Of The Trump Faithful?

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Clouds

Charles Monette


Write On!

Castle Dor


Vermont Diary

Words or Deeds


SCREENplay

Sully

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Living in the Twilight Zone

Elizabeth Hill


100 Years Ago

Births

in 1916


Chess

Susan Polgar:

Little Known Feminist Icon

Alicia Colon


Natural Inclusivity

What is ‘Natural’ Science?

Alan Rayner


Meanderings

Evil frog monsters

Charles Monette


Special Feature

Halloween

Robert Burns


SCREENplay

The Girl on the Train

Lawrence Klepp


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Who Sleeps Daily in S.C.?

&

S.C. City Council

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Why just now

Charles Monette


Returning To Place

PRIUS

Brian D. Cohen


in between

After a Fire Puja

Julia Ferarri


Vermont Diary

Out of the closet


Old Lady Blog

LESBOS, GREECE

Toni Ortner


The First Glass

Journal Entry –

October 3, 2016

Vincent Panella


Meanderings

Another way up

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

The Light Between Oceans

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Déjà Vu at Asteroid Chasm

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Café Society

Lawrence Klepp


An A-musing Life

A Snow Bunny in Summer

Nanci Bern


Meanderings

The mountain was soft

Charles Monette


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Malaise

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Out of time


The First Glass

Who Art In : Moment : Youth

Vincent Panella


Urban Naturalist

THE HOGLE PANORAMA

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

The Pony Man

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Lots of words to it


Monkey’s Cloak

Beyond the pale

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of observations and poems by Alan Rayner, part 7

‘Bridestones’


Love In Action

“The Missionary of Water”

Dr. Masaru Emoto

Elizabeth Hill


Selected Letters

Marbles

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

from a forthcoming work...

Toni Ortner


in between

A QUIET RAIN FALLS

Julia Ferarri


STORY PAGE

Rose’s Spring

A graphic novel in slide show format by MM Kizi


Open Mind

The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Frost in the Summer

Nanci Bern


Returning To Place

Emblem

an essay and 5 images

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

Birthday boy


Love In Action

Neptune and Jupiter

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of poems

by Alan Rayner, part 5

Howard’s Castle


Selected Letters

In Memoriam

Dorothy M. Rice, 1919 - 2016


Open Mind

Malcolm and Ali

Offie Wortham


Vermont Diary

SHOCK of the Present


Open Mind

Can we bite the bullet until after November?

Offie Wortham


Returning To Place

Interlude, New Book & Kickstarter

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

SHAVUOT

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

five directions, five fingers, five roots

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

US Politics for Forns from Yurp [part deux]


Monkey’s Cloak

UP NORTH

Phil Innes


Write On!

Women of the Mounds

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Colleges where your child can earn a Degree for Free

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Ticks and Tourism


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early May

George Harvey


Old Lady Blog

Lights out or the weather of the apocalypse

Toni Ortner


Write On!

Daniel Berrigan

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Returning to Place

Angel

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Returning to Place

Adam and Eve’s Lament. Etching and letterpress,

11” x 15”, 1997

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Returning to Place

Tree Trunk (Douglas fir)

Brian D. Cohen


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Returning to Place

The Wood

Brian D. Cohen


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay





Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE


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In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





Phil Innes

Grey Tower

Write On!




The same guy was sitting on his plastic chair to the right of the main doors as he had done for 15 years. It cost him 35% to beg there, and all due to the dude in the big tower. It was worth it, since people going in and out didn’t nickel and dime, they dropped fives, sometimes fifties.


He saw some characters going in, Indians, he thought, one older guy in a so-so suit and the other in native dress, blue jeans, sneakers but beaded around the neck with couple tattoos too. He didn’t press the alert button.


Inside the guilt foyer this pair showed their papers and were directed to a guarded elevator where one other person waited — he in a suit, grey-to-white, and wearing a cotton tie also in shades of cream and grey, with prismatic tinges.


It took a moment, since this elevator was the big one, and went straight to the top, and they got in showing their passes to the attendant wearing sun-glasses indoors, and with hardly a jolt hurtled up into the Manhattan skyline.


The older Indian then said to his ‘minder’ in Arapahoe, “remember, we are not subservient, we are independent, same as him — but we admire his greater lands and power. This is the careful attitude you will take with your body — do not speak.”


The minder then regarded the other person in the elevator and moved to challenge grey-suit and his stare. “Stay!” said the older man, “it is he who sees”.

Read on >




Vincent Pinella

Writing like a Painter

The First Glass




Here’s one reaction to David Rohn’s recent show of watercolors at the Mitchell-Giddings Gallery in Brattleboro, For full disclosure, David is a friend. He’s an awfully good painter whose reputation stretches far beyond the rave reviews in the local media. I wish I could write like he paints. How I would love to give readers more pleasure than angst, but angst is part of writing, at least the kind I do. My question is whether writers work from different desires, different assumptions than painters. Does the play of light on objects and the composition of shapes and colors aim for the same effect as the written word, that the reader or observer will not turn away? Will he keep looking, keep reading, even remember a image or idea long after he closes the book or walks away from the painting?


You don’t hang fiction on your wall. Reading is an intimate act, a potential bond with the writer. Stories are often written out of pain, and about pain, based on what the writer has lived or observed, the actions of people who inspire his characters. Obsessions need to be made sense of, put into some attractive form. After that, if luck can place the work before a reader, it might be appreciated.


In David’s case you pause before rich watercolors depicting the objects of every day life, oranges, leafy greens, a bottle of water, a porch after a rain, a glass bowl on a green cloth, sketched so suggestively that you can see clear glass even though it isn’t there. The shapes are alive, they bleed colors never seen before.

Read on >>>>



Jeri Rose

Archetypal Hippie On

the Horns of a Dilemma

Archetypal Hippie Speaks





Conservatives and Liberals deny the truth that each promotes. Considering the meaning of the words, we recognize that conserve means to protect, to save, and to retain. The word liberal is about freedom, opening, and derives from a sense of prosperity. The conservative recognizes the limitations of our reality, that the material we depend on is not infinite but finite and must not be wasted but conserved. The liberal relies on the plenty that nature produces as the basis for how to relate to the economy and the material we use.


One can consider the conservative to be feminine as women bring forth one egg and the liberal to be masculine with the multiple sperm that are required to fertilize it. Indeed, women tend to be more conservative, more protective, and more focused on maintaining the family unit. Males will go to war, take risks to get more in that quest for gain that frees them from the confines of the conserving status quo. Yet we do not think of liberals as the ones who go to war.


Read on >>>>




Charles Monette

Ice floes slow

Monkey’s Cloak




Ice floes slow, a meditative pace

snow fringed, white edged circled upon the river

some big as all outdoors… shaped like continents adrift

melting atop… daystar’s penetrating rays also deeply felt

currently moving down river

till finally vanishing, becoming one with the waterway


smaller chunks, little snowbergs slip by… side by side

slandering in the sun

seemingly moving to end faster, to add to the deep

begun perhaps as ice shockles way up north

or frozen on a neighborhood bank

southwardly… slowly flowing southwardly, a push pull to the sea


look… an ice raft rafting, broke loose from the shore

reminders of  Arctic collapsing firns,

neve no longer, never more to be

earth’s frozen waters flowing precipitously

I watch sipping coffee, an uneasy tranquil stare

pleased to see them moving, knowing Spring will soon be here

Read On >>




Lloyd Graf

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 2 —

Urban Naturalist




Image of ‘canal’ warpage

 

The visit was more than worth the effort, though, as signs of life had again become abundant against a dramatically altered scenic backdrop. The snow surrounding the upper trail and descending risers was pocked with animal tracks, most of them indistinct due to wear and attrition, but at least some clearly from creatures other than the many family dogs that take their constitutionals at Hogle. When the boardwalk area and the sweep of the water came into view effects of snow melt were eye-popping. Water that had spilled over from the lagoon -like south shore of the West River, created a canal of sorts under the boardwalk. Waters around the narrow connecting channel between what I think of as distinct Retreat pond and predominantly West River waters, were only partially frozen over as opposed to the near-hermetic icing of a few short weeks ago.


The channel itself, normally fairly placid, was flowing north from pond to River at a good walking pace, as illustrated by movement of detached pieces of ice and other flotsam. The water itself was roiled, with standing waves and small shifting whirlpools radiating from rocks, cement and other solid features on the banks and below the surface. The water level was the highest I'd personally seen: standing on the North – facing jetty, I was less than a foot above the water surface, and an a nearby tangle of iron spikes set in sub-surface cement was totally submerged for the first time in my experience.


Major open water expanses in the pond's Southern reaches nearer the Retreat did nothing to deter people from tromping around the remaining ice fishing huts, and even racing around in vehicles, sometimes towing supply sleds or trailors. (Though it's worth noting that even these intrepid (or foolish?) individuals had given up their tenuous ice floes by the next day, when flood waters crested spectacularly as revealed in the next installment).

Read On >>



Elizabeth Hill

Mein Yertle

Love In Action




These past two months, our nation has been embroiled in, what many of us consider to be, a life or death struggle for Soul of our Democracy. It’s become my daily routine to sign petitions and make calls to elected officials regarding so many issues. Being informed and involved has been challenging in terms of staying positive in the face of so much mean-spiritedness.


The other day, as I watched a news clip from The White House, a children’s book by Dr. Seuss called ‘Yertle the Turtle’ came to mind. Ironically, re-reading that story helped to lighten my mood for a much-needed moment of respite and reassurance.


Yertle was king of all the turtles in a pond called Sala-ma-sond. The story begins with Yertle sitting on a rock, looking around the pond. He bragged about being ruler of all he could see, and then groaned and lamented that he wanted to go higher so he could see more of his kingdom! So Yertle commanded nine turtles to swim over to his rock and then told them to climb on top of each other, making a nine turtle stack! Then Yertle ascended to the top of the stack and sat down.


“All mine!” Yertle cried. “Oh the things I now rule! I’m the king of a cow! And I’m the king of a mule! I’m the king of a house! And, what’s more beyond that. I’m the king of a blueberry bush and a cat! I’m Yertle the Turtle! Oh, marvelous me! For I am the ruler of all that I see!”


And all morning long, he sat way up high, bragging over and over, “A great king am I.”


Around noon, Yertle heard a small groan from down below, and he shouted, “What’s that!”


Read the full article.



Lawrence Klepp

Lion

SCREENplay




The first 45 minutes of Lion are riveting. If you ever got lost as a small child—and who didn’t?—you know how utterly terrifying it can be, even if it’s only half an hour in your own neighborhood. Imagine then being a 5-year-old kid from a dirt-poor Indian family who wanders into an empty train that takes him a thousand miles from his home to a vast city where a different dialect is spoken and no one understands him. It means living for months in the teeming streets, foraging for food, and dodging dangers around every corner, including kidnappers who sell homeless children into the sex trade.


Not many 5-year-olds would have the cool-headed resourcefulness and heroic resilience to survive all this. If the rest of the movie loses some of that suspense and fairy-tale enchantment, it does finally take up another archetypal theme, the quest for origins. The result is a tearily joyful film that’s full of the beguiling improbability that only reality can have (it’s all based on a true story).


When we first see Saroo (Sunny Pewar), he’s with his older brother Guddu on top of a moving train, stealing coal to be later exchanged for milk, thus helping out their single mother. One night, Guddu takes Saroo along to search empty trains for dropped coins or luggage left behind. Saroo gets sleepy, and Guddu leaves him on a bench, telling him to stay there until he gets back. But Saroo wakes up early in the morning and searches for his brother, eventually getting on one of the empty trains and falling asleep again. Read on>>>>




Elizabeth Hill

With Prejudice — 4 topics

With Prejudice





With Prejudice

Project One

investigates the sometimes darker side of our feelings about each other

personally and in our society


<extracts>


a) your experience of prejudice against others


My Mother was born in 1908, and until fairly late in her long life, had some out-dated attitudes toward racial and religious diversity. One day in the early fifties at age seven or eight, I was waiting with other kids in a supervised hospital lobby while Mom visited my brother in a ward upstairs. There, I played with girl about my age, and we both enjoyed our time together. When Mom returned, I asked her if the girl could come home with me to play. I was told ‘no’, and then quickly ushered out of the lobby. I asked why that wouldn’t be allowed. Her reply was ‘she is a Negro’ and ‘people are much happier when they stay among their own kind’. I argued and was really upset because this felt very wrong to me.


c) prejudice exhibited against yourself


As a high school student in the mid sixties, I wanted to sign up for Wood Shop as an elective. However, only the boys were allowed in that class. The only choice on offer for females was sewing. Even though I’d been sewing for years under my mother’s tutelage, I was required to take the class. Later in life I became a sculptor, where finally I was able to create in a wood shop.


Read on >>>>



MM Kizi

Matinicus — The Marvelous Cat

Story Page




A full graphic novel

in slide show format


   Read On >>>



On the trail with Charles Monette

White as Snow

Meanderings




Halfway up the mountain, I stopped and stared at a lone white birch tree set back in a grove of pines.  It had a distinct lower branch jutting out horizontally, perpendicular to the tree for about 7 feet.  Then it rose vertically at a right angle.  I watched and thought I detected something moving on the branch near the trunk…  movement ever so slight.


Then it moved again.  A white creature nestled its rounded white head slightly down and left into its chest.  His head came up in alert.  An owl, white as snow, perched demurely, concealed in the camouflage of a white birch, returned my gaze.  


My surprise and wonder moved me as I slowly left the trail to approach this snowy bird.   A few steps… a stop… a few more steps.  As I drew closer, I was dumbfounded by his yellow eyed, black-beaked, empty-noddled espial of me.


He was a big bird, standing two foot plus on the branch.  Pure white plumage marked his maleness.  Dressed for winter, his snowiness blended his secrets without a care.


Another step, my boot cracked a dry branch under snow, and he took flight.  He flew straight at and just above me.  A magical, magnificent snowy owl!  I was awestruck by his size and fluid flight as if all motion had slowed.  My carpenter’s eye measured his wingspan to be at least 4’.  Flying overhead, he made a clicking, almost quacking, ‘creak, creak’ sound, derisive in dismissal, as if barking, “so long, sucker.”  I felt honored by his insulting regard of me as he made a right turn at the trailhead and flew up the mountain.  Damn, that was something! 


And then it started to snow…

those big slow gently floating flakes

as if standing in a topsy-turvy snow globe 


Read On Here >>>



Offie Wortham

Populism

Open Mind




Our generation, like every generation, has the opportunity to help this country become a democratic one where our voices are listened to, and our votes actually count in electing officials on a local and national level. Both Sanders and Trump preached a form of populism that appealed to millions. Sanders populist solutions were more liberal and from the left. Trump used a conservative populist approach coming from the right.


Let me define populism for you from Wikipedia: "Populism is a political style of action that mobilizes a large alienated element of a population against a government which is seen as controlled by an out-of-touch closed elite that acts on behalf of its own interests. The underlying ideology of Populists can be left, right, or middle. Its goal is to unite the uncorrupt and the unsophisticated (the 'little man') against the corrupt dominant elites (usually the orthodox politicians) and their camp followers (usually the rich and the intellectuals). It is guided by the belief that political and social goals are best achieved by the direct actions of the masses. Although it comes into being where mainstream political institutions fail to deliver, there is no identifiable economic or social set of conditions that give rise to it, and it is not confined to any particular social class."


The above definition was long, but necessary. Read on >



The Owens

StudioTWO




Every now and again I send people one of these images, and recipients are entranced, or more than that, fascinated.


Here is a selection of the overused word ‘unique’ work, but in this case entirely justified.  What follows are images, contact information with a few notes on the artists.


The Old Chapel is the home and studio of artists F. John  and Fiona Owen.

Each year, for three weeks of the summer, the two painters exhibit their paintings in their  studio. It is an annual Midsummer Celebration - a visual journal of their year, recording their travels and their daily walks.

This year will be the 29th year at the Chapel, and at the exhibition  the  three  year  project   "Weeds in the Heart" -

"A Five Valleys Herbal" will be launched - this is an  illustrated book by Nathaniel Hughes and Fiona Owen. The new book is 176 pages,  an A4 book with full colour throughout , with gilded paintings, illuminations & drawings. 

Their hillside garden is spread over an acre of terraced cliff, with a Gothic tower, pond house and box hedged potager.

Every June, the studio becomes an exhibition space for their paintings. It is twenty-nine years since they moved to the Chapel and they have brought up their two children, Laurence and Meredith there  -  both are now practicing artists .


Read more Here



Spiritual Theft in the

Year of the Monkey

Vermont Diary




It’s been a difficult year to publish this magazine. Many columnists have been angry, enthusiastic and despairing per lunar phase, and writing upon election themes the whole time, and at too considerable a length.


2016 as the Year of the Monkey seems to have fooled even the New York Times who in an article dated as late as October 13th 2016 confidently wrote about what it was going to be like with a female president.


It is as if we as individual citizens had no nous, no power, no other orientation than to give it all up to one pole of the duo — that politicians could do something for us for which our own souls played no part. They stole people’s power, like sly wizards whether of the Bernie, Hillary or The Donald, kind.


Promises made were not only difficult or impossible to achieve, but could sensibly only be achieved by consensus in local communities, and enacted from our very souls — World Affairs have indeed become soul-sized.


Read More

 

Passages

Geena Davis

Sponsored by the oldest furniture store in New England 

https://www.facebook.com/finefurniturenaturally

Hours M-F 10-5 Sat 10-4  (802) 257 7166




We're showing kids a world that is very scantily populated with women and female characters. They should see female characters taking up half the planet, which we do.


We're making this as entertainment. But God willing, if this show stays on and people see a woman in that office for a while, I think it will help people become more used to it. It's certainly about time that we had a few female presidents.


As an Independent, she has no party backing... Her being the first Independent president trumps the fact that she's a woman. It causes even more upheaval in Washington than her being female.


So many other countries have had female leaders, in fact the U.S. ranks 61st in female representation in government and I think it is startling and sign of a change that needs to be made.


When my friends and I would act out movies as kids, we'd play the guys' roles, since they had the most interesting things to do. Decades later, I can hardly believe my sons and daughter are seeing many of the same limited choices in current films.


I just read that 81 percent of Americans are ready to vote for a woman. So it sounds like America is ready.


Not Quite Daily

See more MM Kizi at  Story Page & https://mmkizi.org


International Caption It Competition




Series Eight Images by MM Kizi are sponsored by




If you like MM Kizi consider buying her new books

Lily the Cowboy and L & the Bell Gang HERE





Image Notes — Mar 12

The Clark — part 1




The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, commonly referred to as "the Clark," is an art museum and research institution located in Williamstown, Massachusetts, United States. Its collection consists of European and American paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, and decorative arts from the fourteenth to the early twentieth century. The Clark, along with the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MassMoCA) and the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), forms a trio of art museums in the Berkshires. The institute also serves as a center for research and higher learning. It is home to various research and academic programs, which include the Fellowship Program and the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art.


"The Clark" was created by entrepreneur, soldier, explorer, and prominent art collector Robert Sterling Clark, and his wife, Francine. After numerous adventures in the Far East, Sterling settled in Paris in 1911 and used a considerable fortune inherited from his grandfather (a principal in the Singer Sewing Machine Company) to begin amassing a private art collection. Francine joined him in collecting works of art after their marriage in 1919.


The Clarks kept their collection largely private, rarely lending out any works. With the onset of the Cold War and rapid nuclear armament, they became increasingly worried about the safety of their artworks. They wanted to protect their collection from a possible attack on New York City, where they lived and where the expected heir of their collection, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, was located. As such, the Clarks began looking at sites in rural New York and Massachusetts with the intention of founding a museum for their art.


They visited Williamstown, Massachusetts in 1949 and began having conversations with town leaders and the administrators of Williams College and the Williams College Museum of Art. Sterling had ties to the college through his grandfather and father, both of whom had been trustees. A charter for the Clark was signed on March 14, 1950 and the Institute opened to the public on May 17, 1955 under its first director, former silver dealer Peter Guille. The Clark has since become a destination for tourists, art lovers, and scholars, helping to establish the cultural reputation of the Berkshires.


The original marble gallery building, designed by Daniel Deverell Perry, opened in 1955. The Pietro Belluschi-designed Manton Research Center, housing the library and research programs, was completed in 1973. The Clark embarked on a long-term project in 2001 to improve its campus, enlisting the help of landscape firm Reed Hildebrand and architects Tadao Ando and Annabelle Selldorf.


Reed Hilderbrand redesigned the campus grounds, revamping nearby walking trails, planting 1,000 trees, and creating a reflecting pool fed by recycled water.


Tadao Ando designed two additions: the Lunder Center at Stone Hill and the 42,600-square-foot Clark Center, which opened in 2008 and 2014, respectively. Envisioned as a sanctuary in the woods waiting to be discovered, the Lunder Center features two galleries and a seasonal terrace café. It is also home to the Williamstown Art Conservation Center, the largest regional conservation center in the country.


The Clark Center includes more than 11,000 square feet of gallery space for special exhibitions; new dining, retail, and family spaces; and an all-glass Museum Pavilion that creates a new entrance to the original Museum Building. Situated northwest of the Museum Building, the stone, concrete, and glass Clark Center is the centerpiece of the Clark’s campus and serves as its primary visitor entrance.


Annabelle Selldorf was commissioned to renovate the campus’ existing structures. In the 1955 original marble building, galleries for American and decorative art were added and exhibition space was increased by 15%. In the Manton Research Center, which reopened in 2016, the auditorium and central courtyard were renovated and several galleries and a study center were created. Its renovation marked the completion of the Clark’s all-encompassing expansion project.


Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


Little White Doves

  




An artwork by a graduating student at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design: several live white doves in a small white room with white netting on the ceiling. Reproductions of Rembrandt, Picasso, Courbet, the Mona Lisa, the Blue Boy, all in cheap, kitchy gold frames on the walls. There is bird excrement all over the paintings and the plaster statues on which the birds perch. I become more fascinated with the birds than with the art. They coo and fly. A sense of peace prevails. A disregard for the art. The peaceful birds couldn’t care less. A beautiful event.


Now, here, this!  Mar 13


Short & Long-term forecasts




NOAA ADVISES:


The National Weather Service in Albany has issued a Winter Storm

Warning for heavy snow, which is in effect from midnight tonight

to 8 PM EDT Wednesday. The Winter Storm Watch is no longer in

effect.


* LOCATIONS...Western Adirondacks and Lake George Saratoga Region

of New York, and the southern Green Mountains of Vermont.


* HAZARD TYPES...Heavy snow.


* Snow Accumulations...12 to 18 inches, except 8 to 12 inches

across portions of the western Adirondacks.


* Snowfall rates...One to three inches per hour is likely at

times Tuesday.


* TIMING...A coastal storm will bring a period of heavy snowfall

to the region between Monday night and Wednesday. Snow will

develop Tuesday morning, and become heavy at times by midday.

Occasionally heavy snow will continue through Tuesday

afternoon. Snow will gradually taper off in intensity Tuesday

night into Wednesday.


* IMPACTS...Heavy snowfall will cause dangerous travel

conditions.


* Winds...North to northeast at 5 to 15 mph with gusts up to 35

mph, except occasional gusts up to 40 mph possible across higher

elevations of the southern Green Mountains.


There is a useful on-line resource which tracks real-time lightning strikes here

http://www.lightningmaps.org/




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



 

Photos of the Day


Women, in Japan, in Brattleboro

&

Spring elsewhere