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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

Vermont Views Magazine

Home Page

New Features, Articles & Columns


Selected Letters

Immigrants in Vermont

Philip B. Scott, Governor


Old Lady Blog

The language I speak

is a language of grief

Toni Ortner


As I Please

Homage to Milton Avery

Elizabeth Hill


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Tarnished Gold

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Other voices

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

Elle

Lawrence Klepp


An A-musing Life

The Great Exodus-Salamanders and Passover Crossings

Nanci Bern


An A-musing Life

One Sip at a Time

Nanci Bern


Love In Action

This Land

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming — Alas


Open Mind

But The Goalposts Keep Moving!

Offie Wortham


Meanderings

‘Beware the ides of March’

Charles Monette


Write On!

Grey Tower

Phil Innes


The First Glass

Writing like a Painter

Vincent Panella


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Ice floes slow

Charles Monette


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 2 —

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

Mein Yertle

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Lion

Lawrence Klepp


Urban Naturalist

The Sanctuary in Late Winter:

a Long-Deferred Visit to Hogle Offers Rewards and Raises Concerns

— part 1 —

Lloyd Graf


100 Years Ago

Births Jan-Jun 1917


With Prejudice

With Prejudice — 4 topics

Elizabeth Hill


O Citoyen!

Four Pennies

Robert Oeser


With Prejudice

Flesh of My Flesh:  Reflections on Prejudice & Love

Shanta Lee Gander


With Prejudice

Finding America

Vincent Panella


Story Page

Matinicus The Marvelous Cat

MM Kizi


Meanderings

White as Snow

Charles Monette


Love In Action

People Power in Pink

Elizabeth Hill


Open Mind

Populism

Offie Wortham


Meanderings

White Buffalo in the Sky

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

Venus Smiled

Charles Monette


An A-musing Life

A resolute spirit

Nanci Bern


StudioTWO

The Owens


The First Glass

For the Birds

Vincent Panella


Chess

“The Mating Game”

Phil Innes


Overheard

Literacy

part 1, the USA


Love In Action

New Year’s Reflections on

“Charlotte’s Web”

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Spiritual Theft in the

Year of the Monkey


SCREENplay

Manchester by the Sea

Lawrence Klepp


Meanderings

White Mountain

Charles Monette


The First Glass

San Diego, Ocean Beach – November 17, 2016

Vincent Panella


SCREENplay

Allied

Lawrence Klepp


Monkey’s Cloak

Oh, Holidays

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Gone/ All Gone

Toni Ortner


An A-musing Life

Mushroom Soup with John

Nanci Bern


in between

FEAR

Julia Ferarri


Post Oil Solutions

Integrity in the time of

climate change

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Racism vs Sexism

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Last leaves leaving

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Braveheart

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Hogle in Fall:

a Subdued Sanctuary Hunkers Down for Winter

Lloyd Graf


Guest Article

Trimalchio in the White House: The American Dream Comes True

Mac Gander


Vermont Diary

Quality of Life


An A-musing Life

11/12 and Counting

Nanci Bern


World & US Energy News

Nov 15 Just one day in the energy life of the planet

George Harvey


Meanderings

As if

Charles Monette


Open Mind

What Will Become Of The Trump Faithful?

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Clouds

Charles Monette


Write On!

Castle Dor


Vermont Diary

Words or Deeds


SCREENplay

Sully

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Living in the Twilight Zone

Elizabeth Hill


100 Years Ago

Births

in 1916


Chess

Susan Polgar:

Little Known Feminist Icon

Alicia Colon


Natural Inclusivity

What is ‘Natural’ Science?

Alan Rayner


Meanderings

Evil frog monsters

Charles Monette


Special Feature

Halloween

Robert Burns


SCREENplay

The Girl on the Train

Lawrence Klepp


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Who Sleeps Daily in S.C.?

&

S.C. City Council

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Why just now

Charles Monette


in between

After a Fire Puja

Julia Ferarri


Vermont Diary

Out of the closet


Old Lady Blog

LESBOS, GREECE

Toni Ortner


The First Glass

Journal Entry –

October 3, 2016

Vincent Panella


Meanderings

Another way up

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


SCREENplay

The Light Between Oceans

Lawrence Klepp


Love In Action

Déjà Vu at Asteroid Chasm

Elizabeth Hill


SCREENplay

Café Society

Lawrence Klepp


An A-musing Life

A Snow Bunny in Summer

Nanci Bern


Meanderings

The mountain was soft

Charles Monette


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Malaise

Jeri Rose


Meanderings

Black Mountain

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Out of time


The First Glass

Who Art In : Moment : Youth

Vincent Panella


Urban Naturalist

THE HOGLE PANORAMA

Lloyd Graf


Love In Action

The Pony Man

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Lots of words to it


Monkey’s Cloak

Beyond the pale

Charles Monette


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of observations and poems by Alan Rayner, part 7

‘Bridestones’


Love In Action

“The Missionary of Water”

Dr. Masaru Emoto

Elizabeth Hill


Selected Letters

Marbles

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

from a forthcoming work...

Toni Ortner


in between

A QUIET RAIN FALLS

Julia Ferarri


Open Mind

The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Frost in the Summer

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Birthday boy


Love In Action

Neptune and Jupiter

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of poems

by Alan Rayner, part 5

Howard’s Castle


Selected Letters

In Memoriam

Dorothy M. Rice, 1919 - 2016


Open Mind

Malcolm and Ali

Offie Wortham


Vermont Diary

SHOCK of the Present


Open Mind

Can we bite the bullet until after November?

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

SHAVUOT

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

five directions, five fingers, five roots

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

US Politics for Forns from Yurp [part deux]


Monkey’s Cloak

UP NORTH

Phil Innes


Write On!

Women of the Mounds

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Colleges where your child can earn a Degree for Free

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Ticks and Tourism


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early May

George Harvey


Old Lady Blog

Lights out or the weather of the apocalypse

Toni Ortner


Write On!

Daniel Berrigan

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay





Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE


Major Sponsors


Vermont Artisan Designs

Brattleboro Food Coop

Delectable Mountain Cloth

Emerson’s Furniture

Friends of the Sun

Zephyr Designs

Neil Taylor

"The Blind Masseur"

 

In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





Philip B. Scott, Governor

Immigrants in Vermont

Selected Letters





This letter is a response to an inquiry by Robert Oeser, JP, of Brattleboro


Dear Robert,


Thank you for reaching out to me about the recent arrests made by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). I, too, am troubled by recent events. As I’ve said, I will continue to protect our state’s values, and uphold the legal, ethical and moral standards – and Constitutional rights and liberties – that have distinguished America from the rest of the world for generations.


My team and I have reached out to ICE in order to meet and discuss recent arrests and deportation proceedings. We have also been in contact with Vermont’s congressional delegation to collaborate over this issue. One of the interesting facts we have learned is that there are just 10-12 immigration arrests in Vermont each year, and almost all of them are because the individual was convicted of a criminal offense. 


I will do everything in my power to ensure that ICE is only taking actions for which they have authority under federal law. Furthermore, I have signed into law Act 5 which protects Vermont residents from compulsory collection of information regarding religious beliefs, practices, or affiliation, or the disclosure of religious and other personally identifying information for purposes of establishing a federal registry or database based on that information. I believe that all Vermonters should be afforded government benefits and protections without regard to their sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, race, color, religion, national origin, immigration status, age, or disability. 


I assure you that I will remain vigilant concerning this issue as the situation develops. Thank you again for taking the time to write.


Sincerely,

Philip B. Scott

Governor



Read on >>>>



Toni Ortner

The language I speak

is a language of grief

Old Lady Blog



 

When we heard the guns we grabbed what we could. The bullets shattered the windows and splintered the doors. The floors shook. There was no place to run or hide. I grabbed two dish towels because I happened to be standing in the kitchen. We use them as turbans on our heads. Three men dead tossed overboard. The three men left saved shoes and pants and belts. I gave the last bit of bread to my child and for her sake try to smile. I whisper tales of almonds and honey cakes. She is too tired to weep; her head lies listless and she sleeps. Her pants and blouse are rags. I tried to drink salt water but I gagged. Yesterday, the boy cast a string into the sea and fashioned a hook by bending a rusty nail.


Strangers will never believe this tale.

There will be rows of lovely olive trees in Greece where the roofs of the houses are white and sparkle like diamonds in the sun. There are blue doors and a cross on every house so we will surely be welcome there instead of beheaded, crucified and shot.


No one listens. No one cares.  

We do not know if we go North or South or East or West.  We follow the seagulls. We do not understand the reason we had to flee and leave our lives behind.


Read On >>




Elizabeth Hill

Homage to Milton Avery

As I Please




Participants are invited to comment on a painting or other image they like.


“To be able to be oneself and not have to disown one’s values to please another-

that is what intimate love is all about.” ~ Milton Avery


I’ll never forget when, in my early days as a sculptor, I stood in one of galleries at The Whitney Museum, completely immersed in paintings by Milton Avery. For me, it was love at first sight.


Avery’s masterful handling of color made me feel as if I was looking at sculpture rather than painting. Though reproductions of his paintings can look flat at a glance, seeing them in person revealed both visual depth and volume in three-dimensional space. It appeared to me he was using color like patina on sculpture, which had always been an integral part of my own process in sculpture making. 


Looking closely at each painting, often with squinted eyes, I could feel the brush in the artist’s hand sometimes stippling, other times swirling, and also smudging layer upon layer of luscious colors to create visual depth, excitement, and volume, ultimately giving each figure, landscape, or interior a pulse.


Read on >>>>




Jeri Rose

Tarnished Gold

Archetypal Hippie Speaks





The principle seems simple: Do unto others as you would have done unto you. That sounds like an idea to be followed in order to create good relations between people. However, that notion is correct only in one instance.


What we all want is for people to do to us what we want done to us. We do not necessarily want done to us what the other person wants done to them. Taking an extreme example: a person who enjoys being beaten, if they followed the precept would beat others. Obviously, those others probably do not want to be beaten. The person who enjoys beatings can not fulfill the golden rule using themselves as the standard. What they want done to themselves is not desirable by others.


Instead what they need to do is to recognize what the others want done to them. Thus the adage needs to be Do unto others what they want done to them. That requires a further statement. We need to know that doing unto others what they want done to them places on us the charge to learn what the other does want.


Too many people make assumptions about what others want. Ah yes, we know that assuming makes an ass between you and me. The deep problem with assumptions is that we do not know we are making them. They are ingrained habits of our probabilities.


Read on >>>>



Charles Monette

Other voices

Monkey’s Cloak




March winds have quieted

Too soggy to blow

They sigh away to churn the sea


Listening for words of beauty

Some never heard before

Looking, hearing for a different way


Forsythia’s early yellow

Bell-shaped flowers, shrubs of an Olive family

Offer easy to appreciate full throttled blooms


Counting on spring to lift the gloom

Renew assurance with each green grass blade

It’s a young loving time of year


Read On >>



Lawrence Klepp

Elle

SCREENplay




It’s not easy to dislike a movie with Isabelle Huppert in it. She’s a great actress, one of a breed—Garbo, Dietrich, Davis—whose usual persona has a note of detachment, disdain, or icy aloofness in it. And it must be easy for critics to like Paul Verhoeven’s Elle, released last year to near universal acclaim, and featuring Huppert in almost every shot. The Dutch-born Verhoeven is best known in America for the movies he made in the Hollywood phase of his career, like Basic Instinct, Showgirls, Robocop, and Total Recall. But they aren’t as good as some of his Dutch-language films, like Turkish Delight (1973) and two about the Dutch Resistance during World War II, Soldier of Orange (1977) and Black Book (2006).


This movie was originally written in English, intended for an American cast, but Verhoeven decided that no American actress would fit (or even accept) the starring role like Huppert, so it became his first film shot in French. The notes of black comedy come through well enough, but it’s basically a suspense film, and for a suspense film to work, there has to be someone with something close to normal psychology at the center of it. Hitchcock usually got his suspense out of ordinary people put in sudden peril. Even Janet Leigh, in Psycho, was just an average office girl gone wrong. Almost everyone in this movie is, openly or secretly, weird.


Huppert plays Michèle Leblanc, the divorced, middle-aged boss of a company that makes violent video games. In the first scene of the movie she is raped and beaten up in her comfortable home by a masked intruder, as her cat, like the movie audience, impassively watches. After the rapist leaves, she calmly cleans up the broken glass and other debris, takes a bath, and orders some takeout Asian food. Later she joins friends at a restaurant and nonchalantly tells them of the rape. She doesn’t call the police.

Read on>>>>



Nanci Bern

The Great Exodus-Salamanders and Passover Crossings

An A-musing Life




It was the first night of Passover; the night of the first Seder. It was also the first night of the annual crossing of the salamanders when they go to the vernal pools to mate. In an effort to save these creatures BEEC, a local environmental group, organizes volunteers to protect the salamanders and their attending frogs as they cross the unpaved roads to their local pools. I was one of those organized. A group of us met with rain gear and flashlights in tow. Our task was to slow the oncoming cars so all make the long journey across their muddy desert safely.


It was not overly cold; it never is on Passover, but the light rain offered an edge that made the importance of this night sharp with focus. We were there to help sustain the ecosystem and, as far as I am concerned, a culture; a lifetime that spanned eons of the same behavior with the same expectations each time. The winter had melted away, the lushness of nature was awakening, and the rains had come. The pools appeared from under the ice and snow that created them. It was now time to emerge and continue life while the land is verdant and moist.


The luminous sheen of the salamander’s skin, the darkness vaguely lit by what the sky could offer, the scent of nature’s abundance deepened my breath.  My heart glimpsed the endlessness of time and its fire spark that night. Archetypal images rendered themselves in my mind’s eye.  I was filled with the presence of this ancient event that was whirling around in every sense I had.


Read on >>>>



Elizabeth Hill

This Land

Love In Action



As I went walking I saw a sign there

And on the sign it said “No Trespassing”

But on the other side it didn’t say nothing

That side was made for you and me

~Woody Guthrie


Recently, my daughter Kate relocated from Brooklyn, and is currently sharing my home in South Jersey. With her came a partially blind three and a half year old cat named Kitten Little. Integrating this feline into the household would have been simple if not for the ten-year old recently adopted Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix named Annie who already lives here.


Annie is the first dog I have ever adopted. After five and a half months, she has become very comfortable as the one and only four-legged being in this house. By nature, she is a predator who lives to chase squirrels, rabbits, and other critters, including cats. Though very loving with people, her soul is that of a hunter. She has lived in at least four different homes during her life, so I have incomplete knowledge of her past experiences and living conditions, in particular whether or not she has ever shared a house with a cat. What I do know about her is that my home is now her palace, which she enjoys and defends with gusto.


Kitten Little was born on the streets of Brooklyn. She was with her mother only briefly before her rescue. Her eyes were badly infected, which left her with cloudy corneas. She has been with Kate since then, and has lived peacefully with several other cats. For a time, there was a rather sedentary schnauzer named Biggie added to the mix. He and Kitten Little generally got along well except occasionally when the kitty got too rambunctious for him. Then Biggie often tried to boss her around, for which Kitten Little once swiped him across the nose. Thankfully truce prevailed, as they would often sleep curled up beside each other.


Read the full article.



The British Aren’t Coming — Alas

Vermont Diary




Following a tongue-in cheek April Fools article about Vermont seceding back to England, there has been such a lot of correspondence that I evolved this Baker’s Dozen of Things Which Would Change. It has changed from jokes or whimsical ideas to real ones which look like they would work — they are not all in place in UK, but they work someplace in Europe.


1.Universal health care, not sickness-insurance, paid for by socialized 15% of personal income, and managed by trustees of the contributors.

2.Education: look, if you can’t read to a functional level, or make change out of a buck, recognize major countries on the map, or know whose sides Patrick Henry was on in the right order, then you shouldn’t get a high school diploma — but the state needs intelligent workers so why continue to pay 10 grand a year for duh?!

3.Establishment of the Bernie Dome somewhere midstate, say Dummerston, which would be an exposition center and educational facility for existing and emerging science and technology projects in Vermont for tourists and those who might relocate businesses here, plus natural science studies — on a much larger scale than the goodish I91 Welcome Center in Guilford, and as show-piece for all of Vermont, plus large scale new stuff [see Zero Energy Housing below]


Read all 13 >>>>



Offie Wortham

But The Goalposts Keep Moving!

Open Mind





The new book, “Lower Ed” by Tressie McMillan Cottom, Ph.D., has increased interest again in the plight of the high school student who is attracted to for-profit Community Colleges in search of The American Dream, and what happens to the 70-90% who do not get their degree. I am also interested in what happens to the “drop-outs” who fail out of a not-for profit public program community college.


At Vermont Community College, of the first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students enrolled in fall 2013, 16% were still enrolled in fall 2015, 16% had graduated, and 37% had transferred on to another institution.

Statistics clearly show that the drop-out rate of non-white students is even higher at all Community Colleges. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, an office of the Department of Education, the 2016 graduation rates for Black and Hispanic youth from Public Community Colleges after three years is: 16.2% for Hispanic and 10.8% for Blacks.  


Many people forget that Community Colleges are primarily open-admission institutions, which means that any student with a high school diploma, or a GED, is admitted. One of the major problems with this “opportunity” is that many of the students admitted are severely undereducated and must spend up to a year or more taking non-credit remedial courses such as arithmetic, math, writing, and reading, all the time taking out expensive loans that are automatically deposited into the colleges bank account.  One math faculty member disclosed to this author that her department chair had explicitly instructed her and her colleagues to lower standards to achieve the student success rates needed at the institution to maintain or increase the current budget under the new performance funding formula.


Read on >



On the trail with Charles Monette

‘Beware the ides of March’

Meanderings




This was truly this year’s ides of March, Sunday March 12th, ides, an ancient marker that referenced dates in relation to lunar phases such as that day’s full moon. Shakespeare’s soothsayer’s “beware” came true with the blow & snow of Tuesday’s blizzard.


The woods below were Sunday quiet as I walked uphill.  It was icy underfoot due to an overnight dusting atop the frozen compacted trail.  A leisurely gait was in order to avoid a calamitous fall.  This allowed for more off trail looking about.


cold in the low teen range

intermittent windy whooshes

never gave it a second thought

dressed for it, the air fresh and clean

drew me up to the why not top


The sun.  Ah the sun… the sun was strong, inviting.  I knew that I’d be engulfed by it on the mountaintop.  So, I happily kept on. [Caption: coin 42BC]


Brown leaves were beginning to materialize on the sides of the trail marking the best places to walk.  Green needles on trees were glistening green, shining vibrant left and right.   Moving through shade, I thought I heard voices, Caurus or Caecias whistling on the northwest wind.  Perhaps it was Favonius from the west.  Excepting occasional bursts, it was a calm wind today and it felt good to be back in the woods again.  The quiet was a refuge from the noise in town.


being at ease

not needing a mantra, nor a beat

I stood easy with the trees around me 


Read On Here >>>



Phil Innes

Grey Tower

Write On!




The same guy was sitting on his plastic chair to the right of the main doors as he had done for 15 years. It cost him 35% to beg there, and all due to the dude in the big tower. It was worth it, since people going in and out didn’t nickel and dime, they dropped fives, sometimes fifties.


He saw some characters going in, Indians, he thought, one older guy in a so-so suit and the other in native dress, blue jeans, sneakers but beaded around the neck with couple tattoos too. He didn’t press the alert button.


Inside the guilt foyer this pair showed their papers and were directed to a guarded elevator where one other person waited — he in a suit, grey-to-white, and wearing a cotton tie also in shades of cream and grey, with prismatic tinges.


It took a moment, since this elevator was the big one, and went straight to the top, and they got in showing their passes to the attendant wearing sun-glasses indoors, and with hardly a jolt hurtled up into the Manhattan skyline.


The older Indian then said to his ‘minder’ in Arapahoe, “remember, we are not subservient, we are independent, same as him — but we admire his greater lands and power. This is the careful attitude you will take with your body — do not speak.”


The minder then regarded the other person in the elevator and moved to challenge grey-suit and his stare. “Stay!” said the older man, “it is he who sees”.

Read on >



Vincent Pinella

Writing like a Painter

The First Glass




Here’s one reaction to David Rohn’s recent show of watercolors at the Mitchell-Giddings Gallery in Brattleboro, For full disclosure, David is a friend. He’s an awfully good painter whose reputation stretches far beyond the rave reviews in the local media. I wish I could write like he paints. How I would love to give readers more pleasure than angst, but angst is part of writing, at least the kind I do. My question is whether writers work from different desires, different assumptions than painters. Does the play of light on objects and the composition of shapes and colors aim for the same effect as the written word, that the reader or observer will not turn away? Will he keep looking, keep reading, even remember a image or idea long after he closes the book or walks away from the painting?


You don’t hang fiction on your wall. Reading is an intimate act, a potential bond with the writer. Stories are often written out of pain, and about pain, based on what the writer has lived or observed, the actions of people who inspire his characters. Obsessions need to be made sense of, put into some attractive form. After that, if luck can place the work before a reader, it might be appreciated.


In David’s case you pause before rich watercolors depicting the objects of every day life, oranges, leafy greens, a bottle of water, a porch after a rain, a glass bowl on a green cloth, sketched so suggestively that you can see clear glass even though it isn’t there. The shapes are alive, they bleed colors never seen before.

Read on >>>>



MM Kizi

Matinicus — The Marvelous Cat

Story Page




A full graphic novel

in slide show format


   Read On >>>



The Owens

StudioTWO




Every now and again I send people one of these images, and recipients are entranced, or more than that, fascinated.


Here is a selection of the overused word ‘unique’ work, but in this case entirely justified.  What follows are images, contact information with a few notes on the artists.


The Old Chapel is the home and studio of artists F. John  and Fiona Owen.

Each year, for three weeks of the summer, the two painters exhibit their paintings in their  studio. It is an annual Midsummer Celebration - a visual journal of their year, recording their travels and their daily walks.

This year will be the 29th year at the Chapel, and at the exhibition  the  three  year  project   "Weeds in the Heart" -

"A Five Valleys Herbal" will be launched - this is an  illustrated book by Nathaniel Hughes and Fiona Owen. The new book is 176 pages,  an A4 book with full colour throughout , with gilded paintings, illuminations & drawings. 

Their hillside garden is spread over an acre of terraced cliff, with a Gothic tower, pond house and box hedged potager.

Every June, the studio becomes an exhibition space for their paintings. It is twenty-nine years since they moved to the Chapel and they have brought up their two children, Laurence and Meredith there  -  both are now practicing artists .


Read more Here


 

Passages

Jamie Oliver

Sponsored by the oldest furniture store in New England 

https://www.facebook.com/finefurniturenaturally

Hours M-F 10-5 Sat 10-4  (802) 257 7166




I left school with basically nothing, I was a special needs kid. I did feel as though my school had let me down.


I think there are definitely two types of student: the academic kids and the 50% who fail. It's very clear to see - it's fact. We're not doing enough for those who fail; they need a more physical, tactile approach, involving people skills, team-building, problem-solving, building things.


The public health of five million children should not be left to luck or chance.


I challenge you, to go to any school and open 50 lunchboxes, and I guarantee you there will be one or two cans of Red Bull, there'll be cold McDonald's and jam sandwiches with several cakes.


Many kids can tell you about drugs but do not know what celery or courgettes taste like.


Stop being a vegan and start enjoying what you eat.


It's not the extremes and the treats that are the problem. It's the everyday.


If Obama wanted to make radical changes to America's health long-term, all he has to do is treble the price of sugar and salt.



Not Quite The Thing

See more MM Kizi at  Story Page & https://mmkizi.org


International Caption It Competition




Series Nine Images by MM Kizi are sponsored by




If you like MM Kizi consider buying her new books

Lily the Cowboy and L & the Bell Gang HERE




Anguished English

James Lederer




Defendants speech ends with long sentence


•On a Tennesse highway: Take notice: when this sign is under water, this road is impassable.


•Johann Bach wrote a great many musical compositions and had a large number of children. In between, he practiced on an old spinster which he kept in his attic. Bach died from 1750 to the present.


•A cow wandered into my car. I was later informed that the cow was half-witted.


•The concert held in Fellowship Hall was a great success. Special thanks to the minister’s daughter, who labored the whole evening at the piano, which as usual fell upon her.



Image Notes — April 16

Newfane




NEWFANE.

 

Compiled from " Newfane's First Century,"  and other Sources.

 

By JOHN H. MERRIFIELD.

 

HISTORICAL ADDRESS OF THE HON. CHARLES K. FIELD,

 

DELIVERED AT THE

 

CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY

 

OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE CHURCH AND TOWN

 

OF NEWFANE,

 

JULY 4TH, 1874.



Newfane, the shire town of Windham County, is situated eleven miles west of Connecticut river, and is bounded north by Townshend, east by Dummerston, Putney and Brook­line, west by Wardsboro and Dover, and south by Marlboro. The town­ship contained originally within its chartered limits thirty-six square miles; but, in 1820, that part of the town lying northeast of West river was annexed to Brookline, which materially reduced the chartered area of the town. The original charter of the town was granted in 1753, by Benning Wentworth, governor of New Hampshire, to Abner Sawyer and others, by the name of Fane. There was a current tradition, seventy years ago, that it was called Fane after Thomas Fane, one of the "men of Kent," who was engaged in an insurrectionary movement under Sir Thomas Wyat, in 1554, during the reign of Queen Mary, for the purpose of elevating Lady Jane Grey to the throne, in consequence of the odious Spanish match which Mary had formed with Philip 2d. Abner Sawyer and sixty-five others were the original grantees of Fane.


The 11th day of May, 1772, the governor of New York made a grant of this township, by the name of Newfane, to Walter Franklin and twenty others, most of whom resided in the city of New York. This New York charter is a literal copy of the original charter granted by Governor Wentworth. The 12th of May, 1772, Walter Franklin and his associates, the grantees named in the New York charter, assigned and conveyed all their right in said township to Luke Knowlton and John Taylor, Esqs., of Worcester County, Mass. The titles to the lands in said township are derived directly from the New York charter. The township was surveyed in 1772, and duly organ­ized May 17, 1774. The town was first settled in 1766, by Jonathan Park, Nathaniel Stedman and Eben­ezer Dyer, who emigrated from Worcester County, Mass. The first clearing was made by Park and Stedman on the Nathan Merrifield farm, north of the Newfane Hill Common, in the spring of 1766. In In 1774, Judge Knowlton, one of the original proprietors under the New York charter, was allowed some 300 or 400 acres in and about the present site of Fayetteville.

Deacon Park's clearing covered the old common on Newfane Hill and the Knowlton farm. Judge Knowlton exchanged his lands in and about Fayetteville with Deacon Park for his clearing of eighty acres and a log cabin thereon. The dea­con went down and cleared up the land in and about Fayetteville. In 1787, the judge succeeded in remov­ing the shire from Westminster to Newfane Hill; but in 1824 — thirty­-seven years thereafter — the shire was removed from the Hill to Fayette­ville. Had Judge Knowlton made his pitch upon the lots originally allotted to him on Smith's Brook, and contributed as liberally towards the growth and prosperity of a vil­lage where Fayetteville now is, it would have changed materially the destiny of Newfane. Starting, a hundred years ago, a settlement where Fayetteville now stands, with no rival villages near, it would have secured such a concentration of wealth and business as would have made it one of the most important villages in the county. For several years the early settlers suffered all the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of a new country. Without roads, or teams, or any of the ordinary means of transporta­tion, they were under the necessity of conveying. by their own personal efforts, all their provisions and farming tools from Hinsdale, N. H. — a distance of twenty miles — through an unbroken forest. At that early day there was no road or pathway up the valley of the West river, from Brattleboro; but they were obliged to cross Wicopee Hill, in Dummerston by marked trees. Elizabeth, a child of Jonathan Park, was the first child born in town, — February 20th, 1768.


The early settlers of Newfane were never molested by the Indians, for the reason that no permanent settlements were made in this town until after the storming and taking of Quebec by Wolf, in 1759, and the capitulation of Montreal in 1760, when the French lost their control over the Indian tribes in the Cana­das. June 27, 1748, before any set­tlement was commenced, a battle was fought in the south part of this town or north part of Marlboro; the precise place of the battle cannot be fixed. Captain Humphrey Hobbs, with forty men, was ordered from Charlestown, No. 4, through the forest to Fort Shirly, in Heath, one of the frontier posts in Massachu­setts. The march was made with­out interruption until Hobbs arrived at a point about twelve miles north­west of Fort Dummer, "on a low piece of ground covered with alders

 

THE WHIPPING POST.

 

At an early day corporal punishments were inflicted at every term of the Court on Newfane Hill. The writer of this sketch, when a mere boy, well remembers witnessing the whipping of old Mother White, of Wardsboro, in August, 1807. She was convicted of passing counterfeit money, and sentenced to receive thirty-nine lashes upon her bare back. A great crowd of men and women collected to witness the whipping. The Post was in the form of a cross, with a transverse strip near the top, to which her bare arms were bound, and her body was stripped to the waist. The High Sheriff applied a certain number of stripes, and the balance were allott­ed to his Deputies, some seven in number, and some of whom applied the blows with great vigor. Near the close of the whipping her back became raw, and she suffered exces­sive pain and she shrieked and scream­ed terribly in her agony. The wri­ter of this sketch, although very young, remembers the scene distinct­ly. The Meeting House and Acad­emy stood a few rods above the site of the Whipping Post, and their windows were filled with women, gazing intently upon the revolting scene. This was probably the last woman publicly whipped in Ver­mont, for the Legislature abolished the Whipping Post that fall and provided for the building of a States Prison at Windsor.

 



Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


Little White Doves

  




An artwork by a graduating student at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design: several live white doves in a small white room with white netting on the ceiling. Reproductions of Rembrandt, Picasso, Courbet, the Mona Lisa, the Blue Boy, all in cheap, kitchy gold frames on the walls. There is bird excrement all over the paintings and the plaster statues on which the birds perch. I become more fascinated with the birds than with the art. They coo and fly. A sense of peace prevails. A disregard for the art. The peaceful birds couldn’t care less. A beautiful event.


Now, here, this!  Mar 30


Short & Long-term forecasts




NOAA ADVISES:


Looks like it is a 4 - 8 with wet snow, lots of it Friday night


There is a useful on-line resource which tracks real-time lightning strikes here

http://www.lightningmaps.org/




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



 
Photos of the Day


Crazy Houses

&

Beans!