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“Quality of Life, Spirit of Place”

 

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New Features, Articles & Columns


Guest Article

Simon’s Trip

Simon Clarke


Vermont Diary

Lots of words to it


Monkey’s Cloak

Beyond the pale

Charles Monette


Chess

World Chess Championship to take place in New York

Phil Innes


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of observations and poems by Alan Rayner, part 7

‘Bridestones’


Love In Action

“The Missionary of Water”

Dr. Masaru Emoto

Elizabeth Hill


Selected Letters

Marbles

Offie Wortham


Old Lady Blog

from a forthcoming work...

Toni Ortner


in between

A QUIET RAIN FALLS

Julia Ferarri


STORY PAGE

Rose’s Spring

A graphic novel in slide show format by MM Kizi


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s energy news, July 2016 “Setbacks

George Harvey


Open Mind

The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Frost in the Summer

Nanci Bern


Returning To Place

Emblem

an essay and 5 images

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

Birthday boy


Unlikely Tales

A True Tale of Revolution

Or Why We Struggle


Love In Action

Neptune and Jupiter

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of poems

by Alan Rayner, part 5

Howard’s Castle


Selected Letters

In Memoriam

Dorothy M. Rice, 1919 - 2016


Open Mind

Malcolm and Ali

Offie Wortham


Vermont Diary

SHOCK of the Present


Open Mind

Can we bite the bullet until after November?

Offie Wortham


Returning To Place

Interlude, New Book & Kickstarter

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

SHAVUOT

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

five directions, five fingers, five roots

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

US Politics for Forns from Yurp [part deux]


Monkey’s Cloak

UP NORTH

Phil Innes


Write On!

Women of the Mounds

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Colleges where your child can earn a Degree for Free

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Ticks and Tourism


Special Feature

Jigsaw Puzzles


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early May

George Harvey


Unlikely Tales

Tale of the Black Torc

Phil Innes


Untitled Work

Hitler’s Secret Diaries, Or, Some Bullshit Happening Somewhere

Mac Gander


Old Lady Blog

Lights out or the weather of the apocalypse

Toni Ortner


Write On!

Daniel Berrigan

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


The Great Adventure

The Fairer Sex

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Returning to Place

Angel

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Returning to Place

Adam and Eve’s Lament. Etching and letterpress,

11” x 15”, 1997

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Returning to Place

Tree Trunk (Douglas fir)

Brian D. Cohen


If You Lived Here

Tour de Heifer


If You Lived Here

Stroll, technology group plan "Tech Salad"


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers

a feline alphabet

MM Kizi


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Returning to Place

The Wood

Brian D. Cohen


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


O Citoyen!

Meet the Selectboard candidates

Robert Oeser


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


O Citoyen!

Community survey on future fire and police buildings

Robert Oeser


Vermont Diary

Weeding out the truth about “It”


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Monkey’s Cloak

Broken Promise

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


100 Years Ago

November & December

From nude cinema to Einstein, to sinking of hospital ships in WWI


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Studio 4

Now Showing

December Works at

Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Monkey’s Cloak

Snake

D. H. Lawrence


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Post Oil Solutions

Climate Change Café Hosts Carbon Pollution Tax Presentation

Tim Stevenson


ART & SOUL

See article on this page

TIME AND THE RITUAL ACT OF ART


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Monkey’s Cloak

CARACOL OF SOULS

Terry Hauptman


World & US Energy News

Just one days news

in mid-November

George Harvey


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


StudioTWO

Featuring Cai Xi

November Paintings at Vermont Artisan Designs


Monkey’s Cloak

Five Haiku

Andrea Wallens Powell


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


If You Lived Here

Brattleboro Winter Farmers’ Market


O Citoyen!

Restorative Justice

Robert Oeser


Monthly Feature

Picasso sculpture at MoMA

Marnie Innes


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


100 Years Ago

Edith Louisa Cavell

Pioneering nurse executed October 1915


Weekly Feature

In conversation with Kathy Leo


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


REAL FOOD !

Tomatoes galore

Phil Innes


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay


Consolation of History

A hundred things to hide

Martha M Moravec


The Great Adventure

What will your daughters see?

Terri Kneipp


StudioOne

The Plains Indians, America’s Early Artists, at the Met

Marnie Innes






Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE


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In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





A Guest Article is a series of report by Simon Clark who is running 5000 miles around the coast of Britain raising money for the charity Ecologia.  




Days 123-124 Tuesday-Wednesday August 16-17

I’m awake at 1am - three local cyclists have gathered nearby for their weekly lakeside parly, only seeing me as they leave, but checking I am alive. At 5 a rombustuous, probably big, barking dog runs over my body and through my intriguing dream, and after 2 more do the same I'm up and out and on the road by 6. I peruse the town for warm, flavoured water, find none, and again inspired by deft, victorian town-craft, wander south and into the plant-rich dunes, skirting the great Royal Birkdale golf course. Tired and a bit-demented, yet secluded and warm under an early, glistening sunbeam, I meditate and snooze for a couple of hours, then cross the long birch and water-reed strips onto the mighty beach-lands that stretch north to Fleetwood and south to North Wales; and out west, over the sea and out of sight, where Dubliners are shaping their days, momentarily stopping to gaze back, rendering a silent hello.

I am just walking, purposefully and well, a shuffle of anything quicker unmanageable, the west coast stonking hot. Louise from the Wildlife Trust is counting - pointing out to me the sandwich terns from the south, Artic terns from the north, and the common who reside here with the black headed gulls. People gather in the accessible stretches of soft sand and gently swirling, waving seas, and hungry, I head inland for food, through the ranger-protected red squirrel pine woods, modern surburbia, and into the small town centre of Formby. While everyone else sits on the café street terrace of the Hop And Horn, I’m inside in the shade, eating and writing. The food is excellent, some of the best of my trip. A guy Chris comes up to me and offers a place to stay, without having spoken to me, having seen my shirt and checked it on line. He’s a cross country walker and understands. Paul, the owner, donates my food - great people.

I manage to run a bit, through the suburban roads, alongside the railway line and into Hightown, stopping for sweets. I’m sweating, feeling heavy, and humming Beatles songs - the great City of Liverpool is not far now. I’m on the coast again, the clear skied horizons adorned with wind turbines, and tumble over rocks onto Crosby Beach. The sands are firm, I find some momentum to run. The first of Anthony Gormleys Iron Men winks at me, then others follow. Ken Durose, Prof of Physics at the University, on his way home walks up and suggests I’m a man with a story to tell. We walk together for half an hour until his wife calls. The bright red cranes of the Port Of Liverpool beckon. Photographers are out en masse, capturing the 100 men of Gormley’s Another Place as the sun sinks out of sight. I settle early as the path strays inland around the Port, on the slither of duneland between the beach and Crosby Lake. Kids think I’m a police officer in the half light. The wind kicks up, the rough hum of port industry murmurs into my sleep, and expectant of the day head, sing Gerry Marsdon’s Ferry Across The Mersey, my favourite ever love song. Read On >>>



“Lots of words to it”

Vermont Diary




A few days ago I joined 199 other people and began discussing Facebook at the invitation of the company. People have all sorts of businesses and differing concerns, but it seems like a wide-open discussion with criticism for and against various features.


Meanwhile the magazine has increased its numbers of readers — and while quantification is not everything in a magazine that has to do with quality, it is nevertheless encouraging.


A few new columns are in the works, and also series of articles by people who want to write more than one essay, but not a continuous regular column.


While page-clicks give you quantities of people reading any article, Facebook offers you a demographic on who is doing the reading, and this is who you are in the aggregate:—


Location: 80% from 50 miles radius of Brattleboro, 20% from NY City and Connecticut


Gender: 54% female


Education: 80% with at least an undergraduate degree


Age: 52


There is a popular Facebook group called ‘Be honest, what books are on your bedside table’ and since my birthday July 8th I have read:—


Read More



A poem Beyond The Pale by Charles Monette is the current contribution to  Monkey’s Cloak





Whitish and light brighten our associations

Herein conjuring a stake, a pointed piece of wood


Spaced inches together to form a fence, a paling fence…

Enclosing an area, setting apart a seemingly safe haven…


Beyond the pale was outside this area accepted as home

Beyond the safe, the law, the calm… the ease sequestered


Be forewarned not to venture out in recklessness

For rarely does it meet a good end


14th Century English rule fenced, or ditched Ireland’s boundary

Twas The Pale of Dublin; travel beyond abandoned society’s rules


In 1346 The Pale of Calais in France followed the battle of Crechy

To cordon England’s final continental territory across The Channel


Pales also enforced the Russian politic of Catherine the Great

A pale of settlement where Jews were allowed to live


In all, concessions to sell allowed some to live beyond the pale

On open ground, the fighting place, treachery took their chances


Decent folk stayed inside the pale, went about their business

Behaviors’ barriers marked outside the bounds of morality


Breaches disdain of civilization, the limits of law, of decency

Stepped out to tempt peril, to be forbidden… to be forsaken


To reach beyond the pale



Chess World Chess Championship to take place in New York City, 11th December




After months of delay and much scepticism in some quarters that it would ever happen, the company that holds the marketing rights to the world chess championship will announce on Tuesday that the next title match – between the Norwegian world champion Magnus Carlsen and the Russian challenger Sergey Karjakin – will take place in New York in November.


The 12-game match will start on 11 November and be played over a three-week period at the newly refurbished Fulton Market building in central New York. “We are thrilled to hold the championship in such a fantastic venue,” said Ilya Merenzon, the chief executive of Agon, which holds the commercial rights to the world championship. “The location befits the status of chess as one of the world’s fastest growing sports both in terms of participation and commercial appeal.”


The New York match will cost an estimated $6m (£4.6m) to stage, with the two players competing for a prize of more than €1m (£850,000). The winner of the match takes 60% of the prize fund, while the loser gets 40%.


Read on>>>>



For August Elizabeth Hill offers us an appreciation of “The Missionary of Water” Dr. Masaru Emoto in her column Love In Action




I’ve heard it said that there are really only two roots of all human emotions. They are Love and Fear. When I first heard this statement, it brought many questions to my mind. Fortunately, at that time, I was a member of the student program at Findhorn, and we were all about to witness evidence of that statement’s truth through a two-part exercise utilizing a dowsing rod.


A dowsing rod is ancient tool used to locate underground water, oil, metals, and other things. In its simplest form it a Y-shaped stick, which the dowser holds with both hands, palms up, thumbs poised on the upper edges of the Y, with the distal end of the Y facing outward. When the dowsing rod comes close to a hidden water source, it spontaneously dips its endpoint down toward the water.


Our dowsing exercise took place in a large space, approximately twenty to twenty-four feet in length. Two volunteers, both women, were instructed to stand at opposite ends of the space. One of them held the dowsing rod.


The woman opposite to the dowser was instructed to close her eyes and visualize an image of something terrifying. She was to stay with this feeling until instructed to re-open her eyes.


After a minute or so, the dowser was told to slowly move forward, gently holding but not controlling the dowsing rod. The rod held steady most of the way across the room. When its distal tip was just a few inches from the person visualizing fear, it dipped in response to her energy, or auric field.


Next, the dowser was instructed to go back to her original place at the opposite wall. The other woman, again, closed her eyes. This time, she was to visualize and hold a thought or memory that made her feel Love.


The dowser then slowly moved forward. After only a few steps, the tip of the dowsing rod dipped in response to the other woman’s energy field. There was no doubt that fear had caused an opposite effect compared to Love. Love had expanded the person’s auric, or energy field while fear had constricted it.


This was life changing for me. I became much more conscious of energy, which led me to the work of Dr. Masaru Emoto, who called himself  “A Missionary of Water.”  Read the full article.



A contribution by Offie Wortham “Marbles” appears in Selected Letters, July 29th




During the weeks and months ahead we will see many of Trump's major supporters publicly announce that they are no longer with him in his quest to become President of the United States. Most will not publicly say that they are going to support Hillary, but they will let everyone know that they no longer think Donald Trump is qualified to be President of the United States. They may quote the results of famous psychologists and Social and Political Scientists who have objectively examined the words and actions of Trump during the past year. Others will bow to the judgement of hundreds of military and political leaders who have stated that Trump is a dangerous and sick person. Whatever the reasons, watch Trump react violently to those who will no longer support him. Anyone who cannot read a book, and who only gets his news from television, is too ignorant to be a national leader. I'm not saying that all those who are beginning to desert Trump will publicly back Hillary, but they are realizing the mistake they made in endorsing an individual who should just pick up his marbles and get off the playground.



From a forthcoming title “Stories We Tell Ourselves to Survive” Toni Ortner shares poems and prose in Old Lady Blog




Alone we burn


Alone we burn through dark catastrophes of grief

the death of bone and flesh

each moment a new green leaf

where hope holds sway

over deceit.


As Earth Rides


Earth rides waves of light and air.

Pink clouds float behind the dark bark of trees.

We cannot deceiver the whisper of leaves.

Dogs hear sounds we cannot hear.

Fields of ice turn to bright white flocks.

Steps under seas lead nowhere.

Crows question.


We see

poisoned oceans

dolphins burnt to death

whales washed upon the beach

dead birds falling from the sky

refugees who flee 

children tossed like rags on rocks.

Crows question.



What’s left when you are dead?


I used to hold your hand but your flesh is dust and your bones are buried in mud.  My brother and I tossed you into the Bay like you wanted and added a huge rose bouquet. We made sure it was red. 

My fingers gnarled like the roots of trees hold fast to the cliff.  


The antiques you left are and broken and stained. There are a handful of gold coins in the drawer but they won’t buy a loaf of bread. There is no milk left. I am bereft.


Read On Here>>>>



Julia Ferarri writes on A QUIET RAIN FALLS in her column in between




We finally got some cumulative rainfall in New England, a downpour, and the day before, a quiet rain overnight. This is needed here for the crops to grow … that slow penetration of water, to mingle and make available the soil nutrients, then sun to warm and energize. I think about how our lives are no different. The essential self is affected by our environment of growing up, just as the wind or drought will affect seedlings. I think that none of us come through childhood or life without those difficult events that begin to shape us. Whether we are presented with the deeply challenging circumstances of thoughtless or hurtful people, significant loss, or consistently unstable, undesirable events, environments or conditions, all these things take the developing self and place restrictions and encumbered shackles upon it. I have come to believe that since most of us go thru this (to differing degrees) that it is actually our opportunity for growth being laid out for our lifetime. I would even go so far as to say that it is perhaps our map (in a reverse way) to finding our way back to wholeness and happiness.

 

I’m beginning to think we come into this life being given the circumstances we need to be broken, then are given the means or circumstances to grow out of them, albeit sometimes very slowly, as it may take a lifetime. Oftentimes it takes recognizing that we can become set in our beliefs, habits, patterns, pain, or restrictions, which can hold us in unhappiness and limitation. But, this can eventually become our comfort zone, and we are hard pressed to change our minds, hard pressed to turn things around. It takes a conscious choice to stop making excuses… however sometime I glimpse that it’s as simple as letting go—letting go of the absolutes, of the mind cage, of the answer No. Read On >>



STORY PAGE features a wonderful new tale by MM Kizi in slide show format,  “Rose’s Spring”




You can control the rate slides appear by clicking the first image then click again when ready for the next, otherwise press “Play Slideshow” to view the slides automatically. See More of the 44 image tale and yes, the story features real goats.



The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety. Offie Wortham offers a psychological critique in his column OPEN MIND




About eight decades ago, around 1950, the primary way to find out what was happening in another state, or country, was from the radio or the newspapers. From the time of the event until you heard about it often took from a few hours, to a few days, a radio or newspaper reporter had to physically get to a scene to verify an event. And this often took a considerable amount of time. There was no such thing as reporting a story instantly, or within minutes, as there is now.


The current surge in fear and anxiety can be attributed in part to our revolution in communications technology, and can often lead to a pessimism and world-weariness that leads us to perceive the state of the world in an overly negative light — leading us to ignore and overshadow the many good things that are working.

Our great interest in mass killings and natural disasters may be driven partly by the human tendency toward a natural negativity bias, which leads us to pay more attention to things that are dangerous or threatening. According to some psychologists, continued exposure to negative and violent media may have serious and long-lasting psychological effects beyond simple feelings of pessimism or disapproval. The work of British psychologist Dr. Graham Davey, who specializes in the psychological effects of media violence, suggests that violent media exposure can exacerbate or contribute to the development of stress, anxiety, depression and even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


Davey told The Huffington Post, “In particular... negative news can affect your own personal worries. Viewing negative news means that you’re likely to see your own personal worries as more threatening and severe, and when you do start worrying about them, you’re more likely to find your worry difficult to control and more distressing than it would normally be.” Read on



Nanci Bern shares her perceptions in her column  An A-musing Life  with a title “Frost in the Summer, or, A Simple Reflection on Groundworks’ Un-grounding at 39 Frost Street”




Simply put: things happen. Funding does not come through, people have opinions and reactions and organizations have their stance that seems intractable. Parties become adversaries instead of partners. The lessons learned from this can spread a wide net, if we let it, if we tend to it.


When I first read about Groundworks opening the winter shelter on Frost Street, just houses down from where I live, I was excited. I was glad that there would continue be a place for those who need shelter. I was proud and looking forward to being a part of it. When the plan became expanded, I thought even better.


I wanted Groundworks to be able to establish their programs here. I saw a tremendous potential for the neighborhood and the wider community to create a model of health, service and inclusiveness, so that the broken hoop of our culture, that negates and disenfranchises so many, and creates class dichotomy, might begin to heal. A new paradigm was waiting to show itself. It would take immense energy and commitment, but it could happen. 


Soon other voices were heard. We are a neighborhood, a community, and as a member of this clan, I needed to listen because this project was not just about Groundworks; it was also about the people in whose midst it would live.


While there was consternation and trepidation surrounding the project for some neighbors (while I can’t say I didn’t share a few of these feelings, I was always clear I wanted this to work) and those in nearby recovery; I was willing, to become part of the solution with others and Groundworks to mitigate these considerations. I never thought it would be easy. It could make for a frosty summer indeed. Read on here.



Terri Kneipp titles her recent column in THE GREAT ADVENTURE “The Fairer Sex.”




What’s Fair about Discrimination?


Equality under the law. Justice is blind. An interesting concept, but is this true in any shape or form? Are women treated equally by our legal system, by the laws established or carried out? We are horrified at how women are regarded in “other” countries, but how about right here in the good ole’ U.S. of A.? Surely we are far superior: women can work, vote, own property, get divorced, and even run for President. However, are laws slanted against women? Lately, my blood has boiled seeing some of the glaring examples of inequality play out right before my eyes.


Let’s look at a topic that affects us all, equal pay. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 states that men and women should be given equal pay for equal work in a given establishment. As well, discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability is prohibited in Title VII, the ADEA and the ADA. But, do any of us truly believe pay inequality has been eliminated? When a woman makes 77 cents for every dollar a man makes, the facts speak for themselves. So, what did our dutifully elected officials do? Read on


 

Passages

J. K. Rowling

Sponsored by the oldest furniture store in New England 

https://www.facebook.com/finefurniturenaturally

Hours M-F 10-5 Sat 10-4  (802) 257 7166




Poverty entails fear and stress and sometimes depression. It meets a thousand petty humiliations and hardships. Climbing out of poverty by your own efforts that is something on which to pride yourself but poverty itself is romanticized by fools.


I was set free because my greatest fear had been realized, and I still had a daughter who I adored, and I had an old typewriter and a big idea. And so rock bottom became a solid foundation on which I rebuilt my life.


If you want to see the true measure of a man, watch how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.


With all of their benefits, and there are many, one of the things I regret about e-books is that they have taken away the necessity of trawling foreign bookshops or the shelves of holiday houses to find something to read. I've come across gems and stinkers that way, and both can be fun.


Humans have a knack for choosing precisely the things that are worst for them.


Whether you come back by page or by the big screen, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home.


When people are very damaged, they can often meet the world with a kind of defiance.


People ask me if there are going to be stories of Harry Potter as an adult. Frankly, if I wanted to, I could keep writing stories until Harry is a senior citizen, but I don't know how many people would actually want to read about a 65 year old Harry still at Hogwarts playing bingo with Ron and Hermione.


I would like to be remembered as someone who did the best she could with the talent she had.


Not Quite Daily

See more MM Kizi at  Story Page & https://mmkizi.org


International Caption It Competition



 

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consider buying her new book HERE


Guest Article

Simon’s Trip

A series of reports on where and how it’s going


Simon is making charity run in England, all of it

Running 5000 miles Round the Coast of Britain to raise £10,000

for Ecologia - www.ecologia.org.uk

  




Days 123-124 Tuesday-Wednesday August 16-17

I’m awake at 1am - three local cyclists have gathered nearby for their weekly lakeside parly, only seeing me as they leave, but checking I am alive. At 5 a rombustuous, probably big, barking dog runs over my body and through my intriguing dream, and after 2 more do the same I'm up and out and on the road by 6. I peruse the town for warm, flavoured water, find none, and again inspired by deft, victorian town-craft, wander south and into the plant-rich dunes, skirting the great Royal Birkdale golf course. Tired and a bit-demented, yet secluded and warm under an early, glistening sunbeam, I meditate and snooze for a couple of hours, then cross the long birch and water-reed strips onto the mighty beach-lands that stretch north to Fleetwood and south to North Wales; and out west, over the sea and out of sight, where Dubliners are shaping their days, momentarily stopping to gaze back, rendering a silent hello.

I am just walking, purposefully and well, a shuffle of anything quicker unmanageable, the west coast stonking hot. Louise from the Wildlife Trust is counting - pointing out to me the sandwich terns from the south, Artic terns from the north, and the common who reside here with the black headed gulls. People gather in the accessible stretches of soft sand and gently swirling, waving seas, and hungry, I head inland for food, through the ranger-protected red squirrel pine woods, modern surburbia, and into the small town centre of Formby. While everyone else sits on the café street terrace of the Hop And Horn, I’m inside in the shade, eating and writing. The food is excellent, some of the best of my trip. A guy Chris comes up to me and offers a place to stay, without having spoken to me, having seen my shirt and checked it on line. He’s a cross country walker and understands. Paul, the owner, donates my food - great people.

I manage to run a bit, through the suburban roads, alongside the railway line and into Hightown, stopping for sweets. I’m sweating, feeling heavy, and humming Beatles songs - the great City of Liverpool is not far now. I’m on the coast again, the clear skied horizons adorned with wind turbines, and tumble over rocks onto Crosby Beach. The sands are firm, I find some momentum to run. The first of Anthony Gormleys Iron Men winks at me, then others follow. Ken Durose, Prof of Physics at the University, on his way home walks up and suggests I’m a man with a story to tell. We walk together for half an hour until his wife calls. The bright red cranes of the Port Of Liverpool beckon. Photographers are out en masse, capturing the 100 men of Gormley’s Another Place as the sun sinks out of sight. I settle early as the path strays inland around the Port, on the slither of duneland between the beach and Crosby Lake. Kids think I’m a police officer in the half light. The wind kicks up, the rough hum of port industry murmurs into my sleep, and expectant of the day head, sing Gerry Marsdon’s Ferry Across The Mersey, my favourite ever love song. Read On >>>



Image Notes — Aug 15

Smith College





Thanks to a recent restoration, the Lanning Fountain, which has graced the Smith campus for 88 years, is looking better than it has in decades.

The fountain commemorates the life of Mary Tomlinson Lanning. A member of the Smith class of 1912, she went home to Hastings, Nebraska, for her sophomore-year Christmas break, took ill on New Year's Day in 1910 and died 15 days later of complications from typhoid fever.

When it was dedicated, in 1911, the fountain commanded a broad, unbroken view of Paradise Pond and the botanic garden and faced a long expanse that ended at the Students' Building, the campus social center then standing on the current site of McConnell Hall. For many years thereafter the only nearby building was Burton Hall, built in 1914.

The fountain quickly became a popular meeting spot and just as quickly began falling prey to time and nature, losing its original patina and becoming discolored by corrosion. By the mid-1960s it had also become hemmed in by Wright and Sabin-Reed halls, and surrounding trees kept the site dark much of the time and blocked the view of the botanic garden and the pond.

Things took a turn for the better in the early 1990s, when the college commissioned a landscape master plan for the campus. One of the plan's primary goals is to preserve the campus's "sacred spaces," two of which--the botanic garden's special collections and Burton lawn--the fountain links. This suits it for another of the plan's key objectives: to restore something of the open, bucolic, irregular, artfully modulated vision of the campus landscape drawn up in 1893 by the legendary Frederick Law Olmsted.

The master plan proposed reestablishing the fountain as a connection between Burton lawn and the botanic garden, opening the views to the pond and rerouting paths to make the fountain a more central nexus. This work was chosen as "a demonstration project for the whole plan, showing its underlying principles and goals," according to Shavaun Towers '71, a partner in Rolland/Towers, the site-planning and landscape-architecture firm that joined with landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander '44 in creating the plan.

Landscaping and masonry work began in the fall of 1997 under the direction of Charles Conant, project manager at Physical Plant. The fountain was removed while a new basin was set off-center in encircling bands of pavement. (They introduced materials to be used throughout the campus--including, in homage to Olmsted, the very type of paving stones he selected for New York's Central Park.) New paths were laid. Five storm-damaged trees were replaced by four seedling European beeches which, according to Kim Tripp, director of the botanic garden, will eventually form a canopy that will still permit pond and garden views.

Meanwhile, David Dempsey, building project manager at the Museum of Art, joined with the museum's acting preparator, Adam Jenkins, in restoring the surface of the fountain itself. Finding that full-fledged repatination was necessary, they did research that revealed, among other things, that the original patina had been reddish-brown. They then set to work, washing the fountain with anionic detergent, removing surface corrosion by peening it with microscopic glass beads under low pressure, and repatinating the surface by heating it with a torch and blotting the hot metal with a solution of ferric nitrate and sodium thiosulfate. After four more anionic detergent cleanings, they sealed the surface with bowling-alley wax. Having finally achieved a patina much like the original, Dempsey and Jenkins are determined to see it preserved through regular maintenance.

Recent research has also done much to restore the Smith community's sense of who Mary Lanning was. She was born September 18, 1888, the only child of William Lanning and Alice Tomlinson Lanning. Though she grew up in a Nebraska scarcely beyond its frontier days, her father was a prosperous mortgage banker and she was able to travel with her parents to Alaska in 1905 and Europe in 1907 and 1909. After public schooling in Hastings she spent two years at Brownell Hall, an Omaha girls' school, preparing for college.

"Though Mary enjoyed all the delightful trips, the advantages of an education and all the merrymaking that came her way, she had no intention of leading a life of pleasure or idleness," Margaret Koehler, Lanning's good friend from Hastings, later recalled. "Even when she was in high school, she planned to make her life one of service to others less fortunate than herself."

Lanning and Koehler both entered Smith in the fall of 1908 and lived at Baldwin House, where Mary was well liked and active in dramatics. In her first year on campus she forged a bond among the house freshmen (as they were then called) by organizing the better students among them, of whom she was one, to cajole the others into preparing for examinations. She "took her pleasures with much eagerness and enthusiasm and was always ready for a lark," Koehler said.

"Never a startlingly brilliant girl," the Northampton Gazette reported after Lanning's death, "she kept up a steady grade of good, intelligent work, which caused a member of the faculty to say, when questioned about her: 'Miss Lanning was indeed a charming girl and a most satisfactory pupil.'"

Beyond bringing such biographical gleanings to light, the restoration research showed the fountain to have been the object of confusion almost from the start. For one thing, it was wrongly tied to the events of an awful day in Smith history-April 29, 1909, when senior Helen Ayer Marden was fatally shot outside the Students' Building by a rejected suitor who then killed himself. Mary Lanning, completing her first year at Smith, was presumably at chapel the next morning to hear Helen Marden eulogized.

In 1922 William Francis Ganong, professor of botany and director of the botanic garden, appalled to find how universally Mary Lanning was thought to be the victim of this murder, wrote to the Smith College Weekly to set the record straight. "If a myth of this kind can grow up within ten years, in a community devoted to the cultivation of reason," he asked, "how much trust can be placed in reported events of old times, handed down through generations of unlettered people before being recorded in writing?" Not much, apparently, for the myth has never quite subsided.

Another persistent error has it that the fountain is based on one in the Palazzo Pitti e Giardino di Boboli in Florence. It is in fact a full-sized copy by Chicago sculptor Nellie Verne Walker of a smaller piece that stood in the front hallway of the Lanning home: Marguerite, by the French sculptor Jean Gautherin. Work by Gautherin is known to have been exhibited in the Musee du Petit Palais in Paris--hence the Pitti Palace confusion.

The inscriptions on the fountain's base make no mention of Gautherin or of Marguerite. They say only "In memory of a beautiful life" and list Mary Lanning's name, birth and death dates, and school and class affiliations-making it easy to misassume, as many have over the years, that she is portrayed in the sculpture. (She is, however, the subject of a marble bust done by Nellie Walker using a death mask as a reference. It now stands in the lobby of Mr. and Mrs. Lanning's most ambitious memorial to their daughter, the Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital in Hastings.)

The restoration of the Lanning Fountain was largely completed by Commencement 1998. While minor details, including additional landscaping, remain to be done, the fountain has reemerged as one of the small jewels of the campus and a handsome tribute to the woman it honors.



Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


The New Subject Matter, A Problem OF Transcendence

  




Christian Renaissance art dealt with transcendent images. The Resurrection, the Ascension, the Baptism — these images were uplifting. Tintoretto, Reubens, Piero, Raphael, and Michelangelo had their imagery clearly cut out. Live and death, heaven and hell, were depicted in subjects like the Virgin Birth, the Crucifixion, the Resurrection, and the Last Judgement. Transcendence was built in; it was often almost literal.

Veronese, Poussin, and Puvis de Chavannes dealt with mythology and allegory, still an attempt to work with heroic and transcendent subject matter.

In surrealism, transcendence occurs when one shifts from the conscious object tot he subconscious.

Impressionism, in dealing with the common man and common objects used in everyday life, is no longer heroic or transcendent in terms of specific objects and ideas. Transcendence is transferred from subject matter (the object) to the actual paint itself.

This leas to modernism — as exemplified by Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko [Illus.]— in which paint and transcendence are merged, and the object has disappeared. The subject matter is now the fusion of transcendence and paint.

This fusion resulted in a distancing from emotion, and encouraged a cool dispassionate art, in which sentiment, romanticism, and passion were dismissed.

The current return to representation art brings with it new subject matter, as strong reaction to the formalist and modernist past, and a reintroduction to emotion, through the artist’s personal statement and mythology. This sets the stage for a new transcendence.



FOOD INQ

This Page Is Under Construction


  



A new column about Food is under construction, no peeking!


Joke of the weak


  


Cats just want to have fun



Now, here, this!  Aug 23rd


Short & Long-term forecasts




  


There is an interesting on-line resource which tracks real-time lightning strikes here

http://www.lightningmaps.org/




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



Taurus 1

The Image: A clear mountain stream

Keynote: The pure uncontaminated and spontaneous expression of one’s own nature

Keyword: Its Own Nature


Taurus 2

The Image: An electrical storm

Keynote: The cosmic power able to transform all the factors of natural existence

Keyword: The Visitation


Taurus 3

The Image: Natural steps lead to a lawn of clover in bloom

Keynote: The gradual expansion of individual consciousness after a fecundating experience

Keyword: Natural fulfillment


Taurus 4

The Image: The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow

Keynote: Riches that come as result of linking the celestial and earthly nature

Keyword: Communion


Taurus 5

The Image: A widow at an open grave [Illus.]

Keynote: The impermanence of all material and social bonds

Keyword: Discard the past




Image groups comprise a 5-fold sequence

(1° to 15° TAURUS in Scene 3 ‘SUBSTANTIATION’

in Act 1 of 4, Differentiation)


 

Photos of the Day


Newfane Hill — Chromed Image


Morning, tritone image