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New Features, Articles & Columns


Selected Letters

Marbles

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of observations and poems by Alan Rayner, part 6

Bempton Cliffs


Old Lady Blog

from a forthcoming work...

Toni Ortner


in between

A QUIET RAIN FALLS

Julia Ferarri


STORY PAGE

Rose’s Spring

A graphic novel in slide show format by MM Kizi


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s energy news, July 2016 “Setbacks

George Harvey


Open Mind

The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety

Offie Wortham


An A-musing Life

Frost in the Summer

Nanci Bern


Returning To Place

Emblem

an essay and 5 images

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

Birthday boy


Unlikely Tales

A True Tale of Revolution

Or Why We Struggle


Love In Action

Neptune and Jupiter

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

North York Moods

A series of poems

by Alan Rayner, part 5

Howard’s Castle


Selected Letters

In Memoriam

Dorothy M. Rice, 1919 - 2016


Unlikely Tales

features Merritt Brown on camera and MM Kizi on keyboard


Open Mind

Malcolm and Ali

Offie Wortham


Unlikely Tales

Fidget Honey and Nick Priest

Spoof or Not?


Vermont Diary

SHOCK of the Present


Open Mind

Can we bite the bullet until after November?

Offie Wortham


Returning To Place

Interlude, New Book & Kickstarter

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

SHAVUOT

Nanci Bern


Monkey’s Cloak

five directions, five fingers, five roots

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

US Politics for Forns from Yurp [part deux]


Monkey’s Cloak

UP NORTH

Phil Innes


Write On!

Women of the Mounds

Charles Monette


Open Mind

Colleges where your child can earn a Degree for Free

Offie Wortham


Love In Action

SEND IN THE CLOWNS

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

Ticks and Tourism


Special Feature

Jigsaw Puzzles


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early May

George Harvey


Unlikely Tales

Tale of the Black Torc

Phil Innes


Untitled Work

Hitler’s Secret Diaries, Or, Some Bullshit Happening Somewhere

Mac Gander


Old Lady Blog

Lights out or the weather of the apocalypse

Toni Ortner


Write On!

Daniel Berrigan

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Over the Mountain


Love In Action

The First Lady of the World

Elizabeth Hill


Monkey’s Cloak

May I

Charles Monette


Vermont Diary

Is the experiment with republics now over?


Post Oil Solutions

Tipping Point

Tim Stevenson


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

“How Drumpf wins”

Jeri Rose


The Great Adventure

The Fairer Sex

Terri Kneipp


Vermont Diary

WEIRD WYOMING — A LETTER TO ENGLAND


OVERHEARD

O say can you see...

A test severe of on-line language translators


Returning to Place

Angel

Brian D. Cohen


Vermont Diary

QUINTISH


Love In Action

THE DANCING FOOLS

Elizabeth Hill


REAL FOOD !

Parsnip Soup


Vermont Diary

PC, Euphemisms, including death and toilets


Urban Naturalist

AMPHIBIANS AND OTHER CRITTERS COPE WITH EQUINOCTAL CONFUSION

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Tennessee Tensions

Rob Mitchell


Guest Article

New Morning


Vermont Diary

Couple pointers

for President Trump


Old Lady Blog

Call from a Scientologist friend

Toni Ortner


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Hinge of Perception

Jeri Rose


Returning to Place

Adam and Eve’s Lament. Etching and letterpress,

11” x 15”, 1997

Brian D. Cohen


Monkey’s Cloak

Bird of transcendence

Matti Salminen


Vermont Diary

FLIGHT PATH OPTIONS


Monkey’s Cloak

Tibetan dream song

Charles Monette


in between

One hundred and twenty six years

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

Gull Summit — Prime Minister concerned over Hitchcockian behavior


View From A Bridge

Golgonooza

Brian D. Cohen


Love In Action

SUMMER, 1947

Elizabeth Hill


Weekly Feature

In conversation with

Archer Mayor


Overheard

“REVENANT”

Which turns out to be very old


Returning to Place

Tree Trunk (Douglas fir)

Brian D. Cohen


If You Lived Here

Tour de Heifer


If You Lived Here

Stroll, technology group plan "Tech Salad"


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers

a feline alphabet

MM Kizi


Story Page

Berry’s Story

a  complete 24 frame slide show graphic story

MM Kizi


Overheard

Honkie Dilemma

A quiz


100 Years Ago

Major Literary Events


Monkey’s Cloak

Einstein’s Eyes

Charles Monette


Chess

The Silence of the Pawns

Paul Truong


100 Years Ago

A chronological overview of the year 1916


Returning to Place

The Wood

Brian D. Cohen


Natural Inclusivity

A new understanding of the evolutionary kinship of all life on Earth.

Alan Rayner


Story Page

A new graphic novel

Berry’s Story, now with 12 of 24 frames

MM Kizi


Vermont Diary

Featuring the numbers 7, 40, 911, 12, respectively


Write On!

Faery Stories 6,000 years old


World & US Energy News

Just one day’s news

in early February

George Harvey


Vermont Diary

Paint, peeling; plus more news of White Men


Monkey’s Cloak

Momentarily

Charles Monette


O Citoyen!

Meet the Selectboard candidates

Robert Oeser


Love In Action

HOME

Elizabeth Hill


Urban Naturalist

Season of the Fox [part 3 of 3]

Lloyd Graf


in between

“There comes a moment in life when the dead outnumber the living.”

Julia Ferarri


CURIOUS TOPICS

No screaming — we are the police!


Open Mind

“Who would Dr. King support in 2016?”

Offie Wortham


Monkey’s Cloak

Entering a moonlit forest

Charles Monette


Chess

Saudi’s, Satan and so on


Vermont Diary

The British Aren’t Coming


World & US Energy News

Just one days news in the life of the planet

George Harvey


CURIOUS TOPICS

We shouldn’t laugh


Selected Letters

Robert Oeser with Fire Chief Mike Bucossi


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Attempts at Transport

Jeri Rose


Monkey’s Cloak

What Do We Want?

Jeri Rose


O Citoyen!

Community survey on future fire and police buildings

Robert Oeser


Vermont Diary

Weeding out the truth about “It”


Monkey’s Cloak

Awoke in the starless hour

Charles Monette


CURIOUS TOPICS

All washed up — Global trash


Monkey’s Cloak

Okay, we’ve looked there

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Reflections on Grandpa Ross Turning The House

Elizabeth Hill


Vermont Diary

A strange accounting


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

Inklings of Immortality

Jeri Rose


Curious Topics

Raining Cats and Dogs

& Jack the Psycho Rabbit


Monkey’s Cloak

Broken Promise

Alan Rayner


Vermont Diary

Come to think of it


100 Years Ago

November & December

From nude cinema to Einstein, to sinking of hospital ships in WWI


Vermont Diary

Notes from underground


An A-musing Life

The Hebrew Month of Kislev and Chanukah

Nanci Bern


Old Lady Blog

Omyra Sanchez

Toni Ortner


REAL FOOD !

Secret History of the Pasty


Monkey’s Cloak

Looking back dark

Charles Monette


Love In Action

Dear England, Please Send Me A Redheaded Boy

Elizabeth Hill


Write On!

Castle Freeman, Jr. 

The Devil in the Valley.

A review by Laura C. Stevenson


Studio 4

Now Showing

December Works at

Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts


Vermont Diary

Hunger’s Ground-Zero

in Our Town


Monkey’s Cloak

The Back-up Bird

Charles Monette


Guest Article

The Angels of Reinca

A Compleat Graphic Novel Story

M.M. Kizi


Monkey’s Cloak

Snake

D. H. Lawrence


Chess

Madonna vs. Julia Roberts

and other matches


Post Oil Solutions

Climate Change Café Hosts Carbon Pollution Tax Presentation

Tim Stevenson


ART & SOUL

See article on this page

TIME AND THE RITUAL ACT OF ART


Vermont Diary

On Aggression


Write On!

Singing with Bobby Fischer

Patti Smith


Monkey’s Cloak

CARACOL OF SOULS

Terry Hauptman


World & US Energy News

Just one days news

in mid-November

George Harvey


Urban Naturalist

Introducing...

Lloyd Graf


Selected Letters

Qi Gong on Black Mountain

Ken Masters


Old Lady Blog

Strike out

Toni Ortner


If You Lived Here

Gallery at The Garden

Two new exhibits in November


Love in Action

“All is Very, Very Well.” ~Eileen Caddy

Elizabeth Hill


StudioTWO

Featuring Cai Xi

November Paintings at Vermont Artisan Designs


Monkey’s Cloak

Five Haiku

Andrea Wallens Powell


An A-musing Life

Draped in Time

Nanci Bern


Open Mind

The New Israel

Offie Wortham


If You Lived Here

Brattleboro Winter Farmers’ Market


O Citoyen!

Restorative Justice

Robert Oeser


Monthly Feature

Picasso sculpture at MoMA

Marnie Innes


Love In Action

Boy With Many Hats

Elizabeth Hill


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


OVERHEARD

Have no truck with


An A-musing Life

A Penne for your thoughts

Nanci Bern


Vermont Diary

Something wonderful just happened


Archetypal Hippie Speaks

The Incense of magic

Jeri Rose


100 Years Ago

Edith Louisa Cavell

Pioneering nurse executed October 1915


Weekly Feature

In conversation with Kathy Leo


Chess

Review of The Immortal Game: A history of chess

Lawrence Klepp


in between

Developing trust

Julia Ferarri


REAL FOOD !

Tomatoes galore

Phil Innes


APPRECIATING ART

In the eye of beholder

Terri Kneipp


Love In Action

The Language of Form

Elizabeth Hill


Studio3

Strolling with Bernie

Photographic Essay


Consolation of History

A hundred things to hide

Martha M Moravec


The Great Adventure

What will your daughters see?

Terri Kneipp


StudioOne

The Plains Indians, America’s Early Artists, at the Met

Marnie Innes






Vermont Views Magazine


A unique community supported cultural magazine exploring Quality of Life and Spirit of Place in our bio-region, with extraordinary photographs, 22 regular columnists plus feature articles, galleries & essays, new articles and photos every day. 100s more articles in the Archive.






Contact the magazine HERE


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In Passing

publisher’s notes

on current contributions

with extracts





A contribution by Offie Wortham “Marbles” appears in Selected Letters, July 29th




During the weeks and months ahead we will see many of Trump's major supporters publicly announce that they are no longer with him in his quest to become President of the United States. Most will not publicly say that they are going to support Hillary, but they will let everyone know that they no longer think Donald Trump is qualified to be President of the United States. They may quote the results of famous psychologists and Social and Political Scientists who have objectively examined the words and actions of Trump during the past year. Others will bow to the judgement of hundreds of military and political leaders who have stated that Trump is a dangerous and sick person. Whatever the reasons, watch Trump react violently to those who will no longer support him. Anyone who cannot read a book, and who only gets his news from television, is too ignorant to be a national leader. I'm not saying that all those who are beginning to desert Trump will publicly back Hillary, but they are realizing the mistake they made in endorsing an individual who should just pick up his marbles and get off the playground.



This Month  Monkey’s Cloak features a series of poems by columnist Alan Rayner, an evolutionary biologist who lives near Bath, England, on his vacation this year


NORTH YORK MOODS




Part 6 — Saturday 11th June

We visit Bempton Cliffs, home to around 250,000 sea birds.


Seabird City


They built this City of 250,000 souls

On rock and roll of northernmost chalk

Eroded into edifices, stacks, grooves and tunnels

Where every little ledge and indentation

Provides a nesting place

For an assortment of seabirds

Into size and behaviour classes

Living together with minimal interference

Apart from a few local squabbles

Despite the crowded sea waves

Covered in flotillas

And crowded air waves

Navigated by outstretched wings

With no guidance from traffic control

Other than their own on-board radar

Finding temporary corridors

Through which to circle and drop

With stalling tail feathers spread

Beneath reverse-thrusting beats


Twenty metres away from this fall of rock

Into waiting sea

All is quiet

Unsuspecting

Until, all of a sudden

All is cacophony

Of rattles, mews, purrs and croaks

From gannets and fulmars

Kittiwakes in thousands

Razorbills, guillemots

Occasional puffins

Spreading their orange-red webs

Over rumpled stone


Gathered here together

Are little groups of onlookers

Escapees from another

Very different kind of City

Where the call of the wild goes unheard

Unless you’re a bird


...read on>...



From a forthcoming title “Stories We Tell Ourselves to Survive” Toni Ortner shares poems and prose in Old Lady Blog




Alone we burn


Alone we burn through dark catastrophes of grief

the death of bone and flesh

each moment a new green leaf

where hope holds sway

over deceit.


As Earth Rides


Earth rides waves of light and air.

Pink clouds float behind the dark bark of trees.

We cannot deceiver the whisper of leaves.

Dogs hear sounds we cannot hear.

Fields of ice turn to bright white flocks.

Steps under seas lead nowhere.

Crows question.


We see

poisoned oceans

dolphins burnt to death

whales washed upon the beach

dead birds falling from the sky

refugees who flee 

children tossed like rags on rocks.

Crows question.



What’s left when you are dead?


I used to hold your hand but your flesh is dust and your bones are buried in mud.  My brother and I tossed you into the Bay like you wanted and added a huge rose bouquet. We made sure it was red. 

My fingers gnarled like the roots of trees hold fast to the cliff.  


The antiques you left are and broken and stained. There are a handful of gold coins in the drawer but they won’t buy a loaf of bread. There is no milk left. I am bereft.


Read On Here>>>>



Julia Ferarri writes on A QUIET RAIN FALLS in her column in between




We finally got some cumulative rainfall in New England, a downpour, and the day before, a quiet rain overnight. This is needed here for the crops to grow … that slow penetration of water, to mingle and make available the soil nutrients, then sun to warm and energize. I think about how our lives are no different. The essential self is affected by our environment of growing up, just as the wind or drought will affect seedlings. I think that none of us come through childhood or life without those difficult events that begin to shape us. Whether we are presented with the deeply challenging circumstances of thoughtless or hurtful people, significant loss, or consistently unstable, undesirable events, environments or conditions, all these things take the developing self and place restrictions and encumbered shackles upon it. I have come to believe that since most of us go thru this (to differing degrees) that it is actually our opportunity for growth being laid out for our lifetime. I would even go so far as to say that it is perhaps our map (in a reverse way) to finding our way back to wholeness and happiness.

 

I’m beginning to think we come into this life being given the circumstances we need to be broken, then are given the means or circumstances to grow out of them, albeit sometimes very slowly, as it may take a lifetime. Oftentimes it takes recognizing that we can become set in our beliefs, habits, patterns, pain, or restrictions, which can hold us in unhappiness and limitation. But, this can eventually become our comfort zone, and we are hard pressed to change our minds, hard pressed to turn things around. It takes a conscious choice to stop making excuses… however sometime I glimpse that it’s as simple as letting go—letting go of the absolutes, of the mind cage, of the answer No. Read On >>



STORY PAGE features a wonderful new tale by MM Kizi in slide show format,  “Rose’s Spring”




You can control the rate slides appear by clicking the first image then click again when ready for the next, otherwise press “Play Slideshow” to view the slides automatically. See More of the 44 image tale and yes, the story features real goats.



The power of “Instant” News in producing stress and anxiety. Offie Wortham offers a psychological critique in his column OPEN MIND




About eight decades ago, around 1950, the primary way to find out what was happening in another state, or country, was from the radio or the newspapers. From the time of the event until you heard about it often took from a few hours, to a few days, a radio or newspaper reporter had to physically get to a scene to verify an event. And this often took a considerable amount of time. There was no such thing as reporting a story instantly, or within minutes, as there is now.


The current surge in fear and anxiety can be attributed in part to our revolution in communications technology, and can often lead to a pessimism and world-weariness that leads us to perceive the state of the world in an overly negative light — leading us to ignore and overshadow the many good things that are working.

Our great interest in mass killings and natural disasters may be driven partly by the human tendency toward a natural negativity bias, which leads us to pay more attention to things that are dangerous or threatening. According to some psychologists, continued exposure to negative and violent media may have serious and long-lasting psychological effects beyond simple feelings of pessimism or disapproval. The work of British psychologist Dr. Graham Davey, who specializes in the psychological effects of media violence, suggests that violent media exposure can exacerbate or contribute to the development of stress, anxiety, depression and even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).


Davey told The Huffington Post, “In particular... negative news can affect your own personal worries. Viewing negative news means that you’re likely to see your own personal worries as more threatening and severe, and when you do start worrying about them, you’re more likely to find your worry difficult to control and more distressing than it would normally be.” Read on



Nanci Bern shares her perceptions in her column  An A-musing Life  with a title “Frost in the Summer, or, A Simple Reflection on Groundworks’ Un-grounding at 39 Frost Street”




Simply put: things happen. Funding does not come through, people have opinions and reactions and organizations have their stance that seems intractable. Parties become adversaries instead of partners. The lessons learned from this can spread a wide net, if we let it, if we tend to it.


When I first read about Groundworks opening the winter shelter on Frost Street, just houses down from where I live, I was excited. I was glad that there would continue be a place for those who need shelter. I was proud and looking forward to being a part of it. When the plan became expanded, I thought even better.


I wanted Groundworks to be able to establish their programs here. I saw a tremendous potential for the neighborhood and the wider community to create a model of health, service and inclusiveness, so that the broken hoop of our culture, that negates and disenfranchises so many, and creates class dichotomy, might begin to heal. A new paradigm was waiting to show itself. It would take immense energy and commitment, but it could happen. 


Soon other voices were heard. We are a neighborhood, a community, and as a member of this clan, I needed to listen because this project was not just about Groundworks; it was also about the people in whose midst it would live.


While there was consternation and trepidation surrounding the project for some neighbors (while I can’t say I didn’t share a few of these feelings, I was always clear I wanted this to work) and those in nearby recovery; I was willing, to become part of the solution with others and Groundworks to mitigate these considerations. I never thought it would be easy. It could make for a frosty summer indeed. Read on here.



Brian D. Cohen’s shares 5 images in  Returning To Place including an essay ‘Emblem’. 




The etchings in this series, which I began six or seven years ago, are based on the 17th century emblem book. The Renaissance emblem book presented engravings of familiar elements and scenarios in association with a common saying, intended to invoke meanings with a particular lesson in mind. The emblem created a web of analogies, associations, and implications on different elements of the universe, guiding the mind beyond visual experience and to often to simultaneously different and usually contradictory levels of meaning, triggering different interpretations within a somewhat rigid, schematic spatial setting. The emblem was meant to be seen, read, meditated, understood, judged, sung and listened to in solitary contemplation and immediate sensual experience.

Read On Here



Unlikely Tales features an article

A True Tale of Revolution

Or Why We Struggle




Look chaps, said George Washington, we have to break away at whatever the cost unless we wish to suffer more English…


This was already a longish speech by Our George so he paused to take a breath.


… to suffer more English food, he continued.


I was getting used to tea, piped up John Adams, but this comment was met by general disapproval and even some booing.


We need a National Cuisine continued Washington, and we should form our congress so to dilate upon that Subject, otherwise we’ll be up the creek without a sausage.


Everyone recognized that Jefferson had been saying, I have an Idea, for quite a while, and now he said it for the fifth time and continued to be ignored.


What native foods do we have from which to make the aforesaid National Cuisine, and can anyone here cook? My wife Abby can cook said Adams, but we forgot to include women in the new government. Dang! said Washington, but let us move on, history will prove us right or left.


We do got corn, said Madison. What can be made of this statement? retorted Washington, what can be made of corn? Cornflakes said Madison, howsomever they haven’t been invented yet.


Jefferson had been more or less openly moping in a corner, and announced he was going to retire to his chamber and write an Important Document to be called The Hill Of Beans.

Read More



Neptune and Jupiter is the title of  Elizabeth Hill’s July column in Love In Action




During the 17th and 18th of August 1999, there was a rare astrological event that involved all the major planets except Pluto and two minor asteroids. Each planet would be situated in one of the four fixed signs of the zodiac. It was called a "Grand Cross," where all of the planets were either square or opposite each other. This configuration was one of a series of planetary events that would occur over a number of years as the Earth gradually emerged into a new era. 


I was then living at Findhorn in Scotland, and a community-wide theatrical event was orchestrated around this Grand Cross. Players would represent the various planets, chosen through a group meditation process. The community’s Universal Hall was to be the stage for the play, and many of the participants were given speaking parts and choreographed movements that would playfully described the involved astrological energies.


Eileen Caddy, who was the Heart of the community as well as co-founder, was then 82 years old. It was no surprise she was cast as Neptune, the planet whose highest energy is the transformation of personal love into Universal Love. I was cast as Jupiter, the beneficent and intuitive planet that governs the arts and sciences.


Everyone was excited about making costumes that would be astrologically appropriate for each planet. Eileen asked me to stop by her house, as she had a favor to ask of me. When I arrived at her door, she offered me tea, which was already steeping in a china pot nearby. We sat together, sipping our tea and chatting. She then excused herself, and disappeared for a moment into her bedroom.


Upon return, she handed me a gorgeous few neatly folded yards of turquoise silk shantung. She explained that a guest from Japan had gifted it to her some years ago. She’d held onto it for just such an occasion as the Grand Cross Play, for which it would be perfect. “Would you please make a Neptune costume for me?” she said. Read the full article.



Unlikely Tales features Spoof or Not? And it’s all about Fidget Honey and Nick Priest




A kitten who "saved the life" of a Penryn man has been short-listed for a national award.

Fidget Honey was nursed back to life by Nick Priest, who said she in turn gave him a reason to live.


Mr Priest tried to commit suicide three times and had problems with alcohol when a friend suggested he get a cat.


"I didn't want to be here anymore," he said. "I have had fibromyalgia for 12 years and it is very painful. I used to run ten miles every day, was an Army pole-vault champion and an archery champion. It is so frustrating not being able to do it now. "Fidget gave me a reason to do something other than sit in my flat and die."


Mr Priest was also an illustrator before joining Gerry Cottle's Circus for two years, then driving trucks around the UK and the continent, when he started to struggle with his medical condition and alcohol.


Fidget Honey was the runt of a litter and not breathing when she was born until Mr Priest massaged her and blew up her nose.

Read on>>>>



Charles Monette contributes to Write On! with an article ‘Women of the Mounds’

  



Let me tell you of the “women of the mounds”, the ghost women of Irish mythology

In Old Irish, they were known as ban side… in the Modern bean si


They are the banshees of Irish folklore. Female spirits in Irish mythology, whose shrieking, or keening cry heralded the death of a member of one of the prominent Gaelic families 


The O’Gradys, the O’Neills, the O’Longs, the McCnaimhins, the O’Briens, the O Conchobhairs, the Caomhanachs and the Kavanaughs


Banshees are ‘women of the mounds’ connected to the mythological tumuli,

the hillocks, or ancient burial mounds that dot the Irish countryside

Read On >>



A Special Feature  on Jigsaw Puzzles.





The engraver and cartographer John Spilsbury, of London, is believed to have produced the first jigsaw puzzle around 1760, using a marquetry saw. Early jigsaws, known as dissections, were produced by mounting maps on sheets of hardwood and cutting along national boundaries, creating a puzzle useful for the teaching of geography. Such "dissected maps", were used to teach the children of King George III and Queen Charlotte by royal governess Lady Charlotte Finch. See more



Terri Kneipp titles her recent column in THE GREAT ADVENTURE “The Fairer Sex.”




What’s Fair about Discrimination?


Equality under the law. Justice is blind. An interesting concept, but is this true in any shape or form? Are women treated equally by our legal system, by the laws established or carried out? We are horrified at how women are regarded in “other” countries, but how about right here in the good ole’ U.S. of A.? Surely we are far superior: women can work, vote, own property, get divorced, and even run for President. However, are laws slanted against women? Lately, my blood has boiled seeing some of the glaring examples of inequality play out right before my eyes.


Let’s look at a topic that affects us all, equal pay. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 states that men and women should be given equal pay for equal work in a given establishment. As well, discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability is prohibited in Title VII, the ADEA and the ADA. But, do any of us truly believe pay inequality has been eliminated? When a woman makes 77 cents for every dollar a man makes, the facts speak for themselves. So, what did our dutifully elected officials do? Read on


 

Passages

Bram Stoker

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Count Dracula had directed me to go to the Golden Krone Hotel, which I found, to my great delight, to be thoroughly old-fashioned, for of course I wanted to see all I could of the ways of the country.


How blessed are some people, whose lives have no fears, no dreads; to whom sleep is a blessing that comes nightly, and brings nothing but sweet dreams.


Suddenly, I became conscious of the fact that the driver was in the act of pulling up the horses in the courtyard of a vast ruined castle, from whose tall black windows came no ray of light, and whose broken battlements showed a jagged line against the sky.


A house cannot be made habitable in a day; and, after all, how few days go to make up a century.


Whether it is the old lady's fear, or the many ghostly traditions of this place, or the crucifix itself, I do not know, but I am not feeling nearly as easy in my mind as usual.


It was like a miracle, but before our very eyes, and almost in the drawing of a breath, the whole body crumbled into dust and passed from our sight.


A note on the subject:


Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish author, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.


Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Of this time, Stoker wrote, "I was naturally thoughtful, and the leisure of long illness gave opportunity for many thoughts which were fruitful according to their kind in later years." He was educated in a private school run by the Rev. William Woods.[5]

After his recovery, he grew up without further major health issues, even excelling as an athlete (he was named University Athlete) at Trinity College, Dublin, which he attended from 1864 to 1870. He graduated with honours as a B.A. in Mathematics. He was auditor of the College Historical Society ("the Hist") and president of the University Philosophical Society, where his first paper was on "Sensationalism in Fiction and Society".


Not Quite Daily

See more MM Kizi at Wondering Tales & Story Page & https://mmkizi.org


International Caption It Competition



 


CAPTION IT

CURRENT SCORES

USA [Lon Guyland, Bruque Lun, etc] =2

Yerp and Io [Europe/Off Planet] =3

You K? [UK] =6

Celtic Fringe, Witches, Dolphins =13

Stroins, bats [Australia] =0

Canola [Canada] =0

Alabam+ [Southrons] =11


Following an astoundingly funny entry by Doug “where’s my tricorn?” he wins 3 points for Yurp/OP, and the amazingly wonderful Terri also wins 2 points for doing a French accent, and for Southrons! Other entries scored 1 point, even mine, since otherwise people say this is fixed.


A note from the artist on the images:

First of all these images are in a series comprising 3 groups


TWOTIONS (Tweeted Notions)

"PIFs" (Pictures Inspired by Films)

The CHUWS  (Chronicles of an Unreliable Woanderer- spelling woanderer like this is meant to reference the physical wandering and the mental wondering activities together at the same time)  CHUWs are images made from / inspired by different news items of the day- I select different bits of news and put them together with other bits of news ..thereby making CHUWs (unreliable chronicling)


Scoring System

Reasonable Attempts =1

Clearly Better =2

Rather Advanced Actually =3


You need not make your entry a joke, but can supply prose or poesy to go with the image. And keep it reasonably clean

[ there are people under 50 reading this! ]


Vermont Views Magazine is on Facebook and you can make your entry there also saying which ‘zone’ you belong to by choosing one of these handy categories. If you don’t know your zone one will be supplied for you. All current Scores have been reset to zero w.e.f. July 22nd, ‘Brexitland’ won the previous series:—


Please don’t take things too seriously, and the origin of the ‘competition’ itself was a joke being deliberately grossly unfair — but readers wanted ‘fair’ so here it is.


It could be daily, but not strictly.


If you like MM Kizi

consider buying her new book HERE



Returning to Place

A weekly image and text by Brian D. Cohen


Angel

Etching on handmade paper, 9” x 7” (image), 12” x 9 “ (sheet), 2007

  




In addition to religious and devotional images among the several uses of the earliest prints made in Europe in the 15th C. were as Tarochi cards. The game of Trionfi (Triumphs) played with Tarochi cards was a sort of Renaissance allegorical “The Game of Life” with all its virtues and temptations, the cards each depicting emblems in a succession of “triumph” over the preceding image. The trump (picture) cards evolved into the 22 major arcana, representing archetypes of a path of spiritual ascension and evolution, and over the past 500 years successive artists would create new decks on that set pattern.


The Renaissance notion of cosmography, that pictures can be a simulacrum of the world and not just a representation of it, appeals to me. I am fascinated by the attempt to embrace philosophical themes through visual images and by the historic conflation of physics and metaphysics. It is a naïve or at least anachronistic view.


The Fool’s Journey is a book of twenty-three etchings of the major arcana of the traditional tarot deck (and including a title page). Modeled on Renaissance cosmography, the book is a visual portrayal of a philosophical world-view, each card presenting a universal archetype of human experience and a parallel, symbolic element or quality of the physical world. In my interpretation I took the major arcana more or less as is, inserting the four elements in place of the emperor, empress, priestess, and hierophant, who didn’t really play much role in my life, and using my own image as the Fool. The text for the book is the titles of the cards themselves. Angel is the second to last card and the apogee of spiritual ascent, while the last card, World, returns us to the place we started and discover anew.  Read more or

see more works in this series Returning to Place


Wondering Tales

The Cat’s Whiskers, an Alphabet by MM Kizi


  

Here is a Complete Cat Alphabet — one image a day plus an invitation to rename the cat and also the description.


For example, for “A” I might choose Alice’s Aristocratic Air


You get the picture? To see the entire alphabet visit Wondering Tales, or is it tails?


This should take us all a month to do, and remember, dogs have owners, cats have staff!




To This Degree

An image a day every day of the year



Taurus 1

The Image: A clear mountain stream

Keynote: The pure uncontaminated and spontaneous expression of one’s own nature

Keyword: Its Own Nature


Taurus 2

The Image: An electrical storm

Keynote: The cosmic power able to transform all the factors of natural existence

Keyword: The Visitation


Taurus 3

The Image: Natural steps lead to a lawn of clover in bloom

Keynote: The gradual expansion of individual consciousness after a fecundating experience

Keyword: Natural fulfillment


Taurus 4

The Image: The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow

Keynote: Riches that come as result of linking the celestial and earthly nature

Keyword: Communion


Taurus 5

The Image: A widow at an open grave [Illus.]

Keynote: The impermanence of all material and social bonds

Keyword: Discard the past




Image groups comprise a 5-fold sequence

(1° to 15° TAURUS in Scene 3 ‘SUBSTANTIATION’

in Act 1 of 4, Differentiation)



Art & Soul

Notes on Creating by Audrey Flack


The New Collective

  




Building the pyramids and the great cathedrals of Europe took many thousands of workers and a massive collective3 strategy.


    The rise of modern psychology, which encourages individual expression and self-concern, coincides with the diminution of great collective art. The grand scale ateliers of Rubens, Jerome, Couture, and others gave way to the individual artist alone in his or her studio.


    Epic themes are replaced by personal notation. The striving of tghe individual for self expression has brought about a totally personalized art, graffiti. It allows the printing of one’s name alone to become the artistic statement “I am.”


    The new collective will be the individual painters, architects, and sculptors who chose to work together for a shared philosophical purpose.


The Image: Brüssel, Weltausstellung 1910, Maison de Rubens, intérieur de l'atelier


Image Notes — July 28

American Cinquain





The modern form, known as American Cinquain inspired by Japanese haiku and tanka, akin in spirit to that of the Imagists. In her 1915 collection titled Verse, published one year after her death, Adelaide Crapsey included 28 cinquains. Crapsey's American Cinquain form developed in two stages. The first, fundamental form is a stanza of five lines of accentual verse, in which the lines comprise, in order, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 1 stresses. Then Crapsey decided to make the criterion a stanza of five lines of accentual-syllabic verse, in which the lines comprise, in order, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 1 stresses and 2, 4, 6, 8, and 2 syllables. Iambic feet were meant to be the standard for the cinquain, which made the dual criteria match perfectly. Some resource materials define classic cinquains as solely iambic, but that is not necessarily so.[7] In contrast to the Eastern forms upon which she based them, Crapsey always titled her cinquains, effectively utilizing the title as a sixth line. Crapsey's cinquain depends on strict structure and intense physical imagery to communicate a mood or feeling.


The form is illustrated by Crapsey's "November Night":

Listen...

With faint dry sound,

Like steps of passing ghosts,

The leaves, frost-crisp'd, break from the trees

And fall.


The Scottish poet William Soutar also wrote over one hundred American Cinquains (he labelled them Epigrams) between 1933 and 1940.



Unlikely Tales, Soon Abandoned

Photo Inspiring Tale


  



Here is a contributed photo by Merritt Brown which inspires you to start a story — just to start it, then put it in a drawer since you don’t know how to continue.


Review the current photograph and send in 300-400 words of your Unlikely Tale to

vtviewsinnes@gmail.com


Joke of the weak


  


Say no more!



Now, here, this!  July 27th


Short & Long-term forecasts




  




I think when they say persistent cold they mean winter as usual


There is an interesting on-line resource which tracks real-time lightning strikes here

http://www.lightningmaps.org/

 

Photos of the Day


Wild things in morning light

&

Fall